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Old 07-07-2010, 04:07 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dexterknifeguy View Post
A scalloped edge is designed to cut items that have a crust or thick skin as well as a soft interior. Good examples are bread and tomatoes. The points of the scallop help navigate through the crust and skin and the sharp bellies of the scallops cut through the soft interior without crushing it.
Tomatoes have a very thin skin. A well maintained, i.e. sharp, knife will cut tomatoes better than a scalloped edge.

Simple test:-
1) Get a well sharpened straight edge knife and cut a tomato into slices as thin as you possibly can.
2) Repeat process with a scalloped edge knife
3) compare the thickness of the slices

I can get close to paper thin slices out of a tomato using my straight edged knives, and much thinner than I can get with a scalloped edge knife.

PS I once shaved with my 10" Sabatier to win a $20 bet.
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:33 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
Tomatoes have a very thin skin. A well maintained, i.e. sharp, knife will cut tomatoes better than a scalloped edge.

Simple test:-
1) Get a well sharpened straight edge knife and cut a tomato into slices as thin as you possibly can.
2) Repeat process with a scalloped edge knife
3) compare the thickness of the slices

I can get close to paper thin slices out of a tomato using my straight edged knives, and much thinner than I can get with a scalloped edge knife.

PS I once shaved with my 10" Sabatier to win a $20 bet.
Basically, serrated, scalloped or straight edged knives will slice tomatoes. After all, the tomatoes end up getting eaten very shortly after they are sliced so the beauty of the slice is not really relevant.

While I agree you can slice more precisely with a straight edged knife, I find that irrelevant for 99.9% of my food prep endeavors.
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Old 07-07-2010, 08:41 AM   #33
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Also, while it is technically true that you can get a better slice from a tomato with a properly sharpened straight edge that with a scalloped edge most kitchens do not have a properly sharpened straight edge. In a perfect world the straight edge would be the best option, but in a realistic world for majority of people out there in their own kitchens they will usually be better off cutting their tomatoes with a scalloped edge.

I keep my knives very sharp. I use a tomato to test my knives after I sharpen them and I also use tomatoes to gauge when I need to sharpen them again.
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Old 07-07-2010, 11:30 AM   #34
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i'm kinda split on this one. if i have to cut tomatoes, onions, oranges, etc., i'll steel my 8" chef's knife and slice away.

but i use a scalloped edge bow knife for bread. it's called a bread knife for a reason. i'm not worried about a tiny fraction of crumbs that shred from the crust, and it helps make uniform slices.



the only specialized knife that i use , lol - if you want to call it that, is a genuine ginsu. it works better than any other knife to saw away at the tough skin of a pineapple.
then i cut through aluminum cans, a brick, and a shoe just because you're supposed to.
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Old 07-07-2010, 12:30 PM   #35
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That's pretty spiffy. How thick a slice can you get with it?
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:04 PM   #36
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I used to have an adjustable bread knife, but alas, BigD, it was not as spiffy as yours and certainly not a Ginsu. Will have to check out EBay!
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:05 PM   #37
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hmm, i never measured. i'd guess upwards of 2 inches. thick enough for texas toast.
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:08 PM   #38
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Sorry BuckyT, I accidentally mistook you for BigDaddy! I don't know how - Mr. Greenjeans and Homer have very little in common. But the two of you are both great guys and good friends to have!
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:12 PM   #39
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right back atcha, lp.

i'm in good company being compared to big d.
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Old 07-07-2010, 01:23 PM   #40
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hmm, i never measured. i'd guess upwards of 2 inches. thick enough for texas toast.
That would be great for cubing bread for bread pudding.
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