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Old 04-19-2008, 06:13 PM   #11
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I am personally very fond of a set of ceramic sticks that I have had for the last 25 years. They were passed on to me from my dad. They are called Tennessee Sticks, though I know there are several other similarly styled sharpening systems out there. I believe Spyderco makes a diamond version. Essentially there are twosticks that sit in a wood base at an angle. Draw the blade down each stick vertically and the edge is honed at the proper angle. Finish with a steel. This is much easier and less risky than using a stone, and doesn't remove nearly as much material from the blade. When I am in front of a normal computer (as opposed to my phone), I will post a link.
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Old 04-19-2008, 07:05 PM   #12
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I got a set of knives about 10 years ago and in the set was sharpener (a long round shaft with a handle on it. Much as I've tried to follow directions, I can't get my knives sharp with that thing! Maybe more coordination would help! LOL I'll have to check out the links posted on this thread. Ok, I guess this didn't really help answer any questions! Sorry! Just rambling...
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Old 04-19-2008, 08:16 PM   #13
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I got a set of knives about 10 years ago and in the set was sharpener (a long round shaft with a handle on it. Much as I've tried to follow directions, I can't get my knives sharp with that thing!...


I'm not surprised. That steel rod with a handle on it is a hone, not a sharpener. Even though it's sometimes called a sharpening steel, all it does is dress the existing edge. It cannot put a new wdge on a blade.

Take your knives to a professional sharpener then help keep them sharp with the steel.
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Old 04-20-2008, 12:50 AM   #14
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I am personally very fond of a set of ceramic sticks that I have had for the last 25 years. They were passed on to me from my dad. They are called Tennessee Sticks, though I know there are several other similarly styled sharpening systems out there.
I have a couple Tennesee Big Sticks, too. I don't use 'em much as they're pretty short.

I am not a big fan of steels, at least not the grooved kind you normally see in knife blocks. IMOHO they're too hard on knives, especially thin, fine edged knives like Japanese ones. The edge they give you is mostly microserration and is essentially edge damage. If you have to use one, then use very very light strokes. I use a fine ceramic, either an 8" that I got from EdgePro Inc. or a 12" DMT CS2. Eventually I'll probably buy a glass one from Dave @ Japanese Knife Sharpening.
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Old 04-20-2008, 12:56 AM   #15
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I'm not surprised. That steel rod with a handle on it is a hone, not a sharpener. Even though it's sometimes called a sharpening steel, all it does is dress the existing edge. It cannot put a new wdge on a blade.

Take your knives to a professional sharpener then help keep them sharp with the steel.
*blush* I thought it was a sharpener. Thanks a bunch for the info!
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Old 04-20-2008, 09:47 AM   #16
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Eventually I'll probably buy a glass one from Dave @ Japanese Knife Sharpening.
Here ya go Rob. I seldom use the EP ceramic rod as I finish with stropping instead.

I have both the Hand American glass smooth steel and borosilicate rod with the micro grooves on opposing quarters. I no longer use any of the smooth surfaces as the micro grooved quarters does excellent touch up work on both soft German and hard Japanese edges.
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Old 04-20-2008, 10:00 AM   #17
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I'm not surprised. That steel rod with a handle on it is a hone, not a sharpener. Even though it's sometimes called a sharpening steel, all it does is dress the existing edge. It cannot put a new wdge on a blade.
Andy, grooved sharpening steels are nothing more than round files and they do sharpen. If nothing else, they remove too much metal. They don't provide an edge that I would consider serviceable in my kitchen. When viewed under magnification the edges produced are rough and jagged compared to sharpening with waterstones and strops, but each to his own. I have seen butchers in meat packing plants who use nothing but steels to keep their edges cutting but it's not for me.

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Old 04-21-2008, 01:23 PM   #18
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If you have a dull knife you need something like a 3 stone sharpening system with a coarse stone, a medium stone, and a fine stone.

And a steel to keep it sharp in between sharpenings.
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Old 04-21-2008, 01:55 PM   #19
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I'm looking at my old Dexter Steel of unknown vintage and already worn very smooth and remove what 'tooth' is left using fine abrasives and jewelers rouge.

The Dexter isn't my only steel, in comparison the Henkels (from both the community (cheap) set and private (good) set) are like a round files.
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Old 04-21-2008, 06:02 PM   #20
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If you have a dull knife you need something like a 3 stone sharpening system with a coarse stone, a medium stone, and a fine stone.

And a steel to keep it sharp in between sharpenings.
Which three stones and which "steel" are you using?
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