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Old 01-07-2008, 09:07 PM   #51
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There is a special glove that you can get that you can wear on the hand that's holding the food to be cut.

It's made of a special kind of material that when worn, it can't be penetrated by sharp knives. It's mandatory in the food service business now for protection against cuts.

I think you have to go to a restaurant equipment suppy store for it though, as it is not sold in regular stores.
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Old 01-07-2008, 09:50 PM   #52
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Yeah, sharp knives are definitely worse for cuts than dull knives, but I stand by my assertation that dull knives are more dangerous for getting cut due to the uneven nature of them.

My worst cut required 7 stitches when a ceramic blade turned against me. Well, more accurately, I hit a rubbery part of an onion and the blade slipped. Regardless, it was nasty. And yes, the knife was razor sharp.
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:03 AM   #53
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123 View Post
There is a special glove that you can get that you can wear on the hand that's holding the food to be cut.

It's made of a special kind of material that when worn, it can't be penetrated by sharp knives. It's mandatory in the food service business now for protection against cuts.

I think you have to go to a restaurant equipment suppy store for it though, as it is not sold in regular stores.

I have a few knives I'd like to pit vs the Forshcner Cut Glove!
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:05 AM   #54
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Um...not while my finger is in 'em, though!
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Old 03-08-2008, 09:04 AM   #55
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I use a modified 1x42 belt sander to sharpen my knives. I go in steps up to 1200 grt then finish with a leather honing belt it leaves a polished convexed edge that very sharp and lasts a long time.
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:36 AM   #56
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[quote=justplainbill;527042]Unfortunately DMTís 1200 grit / 9 micron and 2200 grit / 7 micron sharpening rods are not available in lengths greater than 12". Their 14" Ďsteelí only appears to be available in 600 grit / 25 microns. While 600 grit might be ok, if itís your only sharpening tool, itís perhaps a tad too aggressive for regular use.

I thought that the steel used in quality knives these days was so hard that you really do need something this agressive. Does honing really work with all this new bad a** steel? Otherwise, I've been grinding my knife down with a DMT... it's still sharp though.
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Old 03-24-2008, 09:53 AM   #57
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I thought that the steel used in quality knives these days was so hard that you really do need something this agressive. Does honing really work with all this new bad a** steel?
Yup. There's something new on the sharpening market. Borosilicate. I first came out as smooth like on the glass smooth steel steels. Now microgrooving has been added and they work extremely well in maintaining an edge in between sharpenings. My Japanese knives respond much better to the microgrooving than they do to a smooth surface. Available here.
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Old 03-24-2008, 10:16 AM   #58
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Wow, that thing looks awesome. Do you just use it the same way you would a steel?
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Old 03-24-2008, 10:32 AM   #59
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Wow, that thing looks awesome. Do you just use it the same way you would a steel?
Yes, with very light pressure. Three alternate strokes per side is all it takes to bring the edge back.

The particular unit in the picture is smooth glass on two opposing quarters, and microgrooved glass on the other two opposing quarters. I use the smooth on my Germans and old Sabatier knives and the microgrooves on my Japanese.
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