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Old 03-13-2013, 10:12 AM   #21
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My understanding is that proper use of a steel does not remove any material at all. It just straightens the burr which is always present on a sharp edge. I back hone and just stop there. My knives will cut a tomato paper thin for months without any actual resharpening, just using a steel and back honing.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:09 PM   #22
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My understanding is that proper use of a steel does not remove any material at all. It just straightens the burr which is always present on a sharp edge. I back hone and just stop there. My knives will cut a tomato paper thin for months without any actual resharpening, just using a steel and back honing.
I argued the same point with my FIL, while he was still living. He was a stubborn man and had to prove to me that I was wrong. If enough pressure is applied to the knife, metal is removed. But normally, you are correct. Steeling/honing doesn't remove metal. Back/steeling does, I think, but a very minute amount. I think it pouts micro-serations on the edge, making it slice tough skinned, delicate fruits, like tomatoes, plumbs, etc. My knife also goes through such foods easily, and at the same time, will handle the toughest rutabaga, or winter squash.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 03-13-2013, 11:30 PM   #23
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I argued the same point with my FIL, while he was still living. He was a stubborn man and had to prove to me that I was wrong. If enough pressure is applied to the knife, metal is removed. But normally, you are correct. Steeling/honing doesn't remove metal. Back/steeling does, I think, but a very minute amount. I think it pouts micro-serations on the edge, making it slice tough skinned, delicate fruits, like tomatoes, plumbs, etc. My knife also goes through such foods easily, and at the same time, will handle the toughest rutabaga, or winter squash.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
Yeah. I can go from piecing chicken wings to slicing tomatoes with just a quick soapy wash in between. A sharp knife is truly a wonder.
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Old 03-14-2013, 01:29 AM   #24
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Rob Babcock is a knife sharpening guru around here, and takes his sharpening to, for most of us, a ridiculous degree. I'm sure he could split hairs with his knives. I just want mine to easily slice through food. My point is, he knows what he's talking about.
Teehee...guilty as charged! I do get a little carried away when it comes to sharpening Japanese knives but for Wusthofs and the like I generally either use my Kalamazoo 42" x 1" belt grinder (finishing on a leather belt doped with 0.5 micron CrO paste) or on stones, in which case I usually just go up to a 2k Naniwa "Green Brick" or Aotoshi. That's about as fine an edge as those knives will hold.
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Old 07-04-2013, 08:28 AM   #25
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What is Lansky? Never heard of it. (Well.... ahem Meyer... But that's another Forum,
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Old 07-04-2013, 08:32 AM   #26
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What is "back honing" ? Guess I'd better get Google out if I am to survive this Forum! ROFLMAO.
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Old 07-04-2013, 09:32 AM   #27
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What is "back honing" ? Guess I'd better get Google out if I am to survive this Forum! ROFLMAO.
The Chief explained back honing: it is done with the spine of the knife going first. The knife is dragged along the steel in the direction of the spine. With regular honing, you move the knife as though you were trying to shave off a very thin slice of the steel.
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Old 07-04-2013, 09:35 AM   #28
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What is "back honing" ? Guess I'd better get Google out if I am to survive this Forum! ROFLMAO.
Typically, when you sharpen a knife, you push the knife, edge forward, against the sharpening stone. When you "steel" a knife, you do the same. The stroke pushes the knife edge forward, against the honing steel.

Back-steeling is a technique where the knive edge is dragged across the steel, instead if pushed forward. If you think of the knife blade as an airplane wing, the back (heel) of the blade would be the leading edge, while the sharp edge would be the trailing edge, and the part that contacts the steel. Often, back-stealing is required when the knife edge begins to dull. It is faster than breaking out the sharpening hardware, and can produce a very sharp edge on the blade. It will leave a burr though, and so the knife must be steeled - edge forward _ for a few strokes afterward.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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