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Old 01-04-2005, 08:58 PM   #1
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Showing off the gear (photo)




My friends Chin (the cleaver) and Tizona (the chef knife).

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Old 01-04-2005, 09:02 PM   #2
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Lugaru, I pity the poor veggie or cut of meat the tries to fool with you. Nice picture.

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Old 01-04-2005, 09:06 PM   #3
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Now THAT'S a cleaver!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 01-04-2005, 09:08 PM   #4
 
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Making any money off a remarkable resemblance to a younger "Emeril"?
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Old 01-05-2005, 07:56 AM   #5
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Chocolate chef will love those blades when she sees them!
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Old 01-05-2005, 08:59 AM   #6
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lugaru, great to see you and your "leetle friends"...

i keep thinking of you sounding like robert deniro from that picture. to the creepy guy in the mirror, "are you talking to me? are YOU talking to me?"

and "i heard tings, i don't know, but i heard tings. lil' bit, lil bit."
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Old 01-05-2005, 09:43 AM   #7
 
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Originally Posted by PA Baker
Chocolate chef will love those blades when she sees them!
They are some nice knives.
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Old 01-05-2005, 11:20 AM   #8
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Lugaru, chop, chop. Great knives. Ya look pretty happy in the pic. too. :D
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Old 01-05-2005, 12:08 PM   #9
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It's nice putting a face with the name. Thanks!
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Old 01-05-2005, 12:40 PM   #10
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Thanks guys... Chin cost me about 7 bucks at super88 which is a chinese supermarket. He sliced through playing cards like butter when I first got him and althought it's dulled a little since then well... like kitchen elf says... it has some heft so it can go through any thing with a little muscle. I especially like using the dull side like a hammer to break up chicken breasts that are frozen to each other.

Tizona is a big step up... usally a $100 to $150 knife, I bought this one at a store that specializes in fixing defective and broken knives for resale. You honestly cant tell the difference, it slices like a dream. My favorite task for it is scraping it along a bolock of cheese back and forth and watching perfectly grated ribons fall.


... and yes, my landlord dosent let me have pets so all my knives are named. Sigh...
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Old 01-05-2005, 12:44 PM   #11
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LOL! Very cool, Lugaru! I name my kitchen utensils too, don't feel so bad! I have a 10" blade that I call Zorro. :roll: 8)
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Old 01-05-2005, 05:12 PM   #12
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Luguaru those things look lethal, I will not argue with you. Do you dress you own beef and pork?????
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Old 01-05-2005, 10:30 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
Luguaru those things look lethal, I will not argue with you. Do you dress you own beef and pork?????
By dress do you mean butcher?

Because yeah, I like to buy big chunks (8 to 15 pounds) with skin and bones included as it lowers the price to a lot and give's me a nice cutting workout in the process.

My most recent "victim" was a pork shoulder which went into the freezer in recycled grocery bags labeled "mirin marinaded", "vindaloo marinade", "plain" and then whatever strikes my fancy at the moment.
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Old 01-06-2005, 02:42 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Lugaru
Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
Luguaru those things look lethal, I will not argue with you. Do you dress you own beef and pork?????
By dress do you mean butcher?

Because yeah, I like to buy big chunks (8 to 15 pounds) with skin and bones included as it lowers the price to a lot and give's me a nice cutting workout in the process.

My most recent "victim" was a pork shoulder which went into the freezer in recycled grocery bags labeled "mirin marinaded", "vindaloo marinade", "plain" and then whatever strikes my fancy at the moment.
yes, lugaru, i meant butcher. What else is in you mirin marinade? I use it whenever I make terryaki, but always looking for other versions.
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Old 01-06-2005, 03:37 PM   #15
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For my Mirin marinade I go pretty simple, it usually contains only CHEAP Mirin produced by "sushi chef" (part of the Barryclef company) which is a highly syrupy mirin that smells not unlike beer when frying. This give's a really nice dark glaze if you allow the sugars to burn a little.

To this I add some chinese cooking wine and some rice vinegar.

Last but not least diced ginger, diced garlic (raw) and that's probably it... I rarely add any soysauce or stuff like that unless I want the color to seap all the way in.


Also if you want a pretty authentic "chinese spare rib" flavor use some sambuka instead, it has that nice alcohol and anis kick that make's it taste like a fancy restaurants ribs. With some powdered rib sauce or ketchup for color your all set.
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Old 01-06-2005, 03:42 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lugaru
For my Mirin marinade I go pretty simple, it usually contains only CHEAP Mirin produced by "sushi chef" (part of the Barryclef company) which is a highly syrupy mirin that smells not unlike beer when frying. This give's a really nice dark glaze if you allow the sugars to burn a little.

To this I add some chinese cooking wine and some rice vinegar.

Last but not least diced ginger, diced garlic (raw) and that's probably it... I rarely add any soysauce or stuff like that unless I want the color to seap all the way in.

Also if you want a pretty authentic "chinese spare rib" flavor use some sambuka instead, it has that nice alcohol and anis kick that make's it taste like a fancy restaurants ribs. With some powdered rib sauce or ketchup for color your all set.
Thanks, lugaru.
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