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Old 04-20-2010, 06:13 AM   #1
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Single bevel knives?

I'm looking at getting a sashimi knife and figure that if I'm going Japanese I might as well go the whole hog and get a single bevel knife.

Any tips on sharpening, use and care of single bevel knives that would be different from double bevel knives?

On the sharpening front I'm a little worried that a burr might develop on the back edge.

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Old 04-20-2010, 11:37 AM   #2
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The back of the blade is concave; you basically lay it flat on the stone and remove the burr with a couple swipes.
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Old 04-28-2010, 06:39 AM   #3
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Just got the knife delivered. Harima/Kumagaro (aka Ice Bear) knife not sure on the exact designation, but its carbon steel with a layer of mild stainless to prevent the hassle of caring for CS. Honyaki construction if that means anything to the J-knife fans.

Ay ay ay, this thing is sharp straight out of the box, I mean cutting divots out of the cutting board kind of sharp.

A couple of minor gripes. The blade is a little thicker than what I'd consider to be optimum and the tang obviously doesn't extend all that far down the handle. I did get it for a very nice price and overall I am very happy.

It did prompt the following exchange at work today though.

Me: Meet the new member of the family [fondles knife lovingly]
Ben: Woah dude, seriously you're like Dexter with all your knives.
Me: Dexter's an amateur.
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Old 04-28-2010, 05:29 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
Just got the knife delivered. Harima/Kumagaro (aka Ice Bear) knife not sure on the exact designation, but its carbon steel with a layer of mild stainless to prevent the hassle of caring for CS. Honyaki construction if that means anything to the J-knife fans.

Hmmm...the word Honyaki roughly translates to "true forged" and refers to a knife made out of a single type of steel. Clad and honyaki are opposites. Typically you see knives made of different types of steel called Warikomi, San-Mai, etc depending on the type of construction.

That said, I'm sure it's a fine knife. I'm anxious to hear how it works out for you.
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Old 04-29-2010, 04:27 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
Hmmm...the word Honyaki roughly translates to "true forged" and refers to a knife made out of a single type of steel. Clad and honyaki are opposites. Typically you see knives made of different types of steel called Warikomi, San-Mai, etc depending on the type of construction.

That said, I'm sure it's a fine knife. I'm anxious to hear how it works out for you.
We don't do a whole lot of fish, so it may take a few days.

If we were a serious fish restaurant I'd probably get it re-handled, but since I'm not going to be using it that much I won't go to that trouble yet.

Seriously sharp and I've played with it on some tomatoes and onions and the single bevel is taking some getting used to, but I can see how it works and how it is a very serious fish knife. Makes getting very flat slices easy.
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Old 04-29-2010, 07:05 AM   #6
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Glad to hear it's doing a fine job for you, PG!
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:11 AM   #7
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One further question on the SS over CS cladding.

I've noticed that there's some discoloration on the cutting edge so I've swiped some mineral oil on the edge of the blade - I'm assuming that this is something I'll have to keep on doing on a regular basis.
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Old 05-02-2010, 08:23 AM   #8
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Would seem you need to treat the carbon steel edge as you would treat a carbon steel knife. Over time discoloration is normal but rust should be avoided.
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Old 05-02-2010, 05:43 PM   #9
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It's hard to know how reactive the carbon will be without knowing what type it is, but generally a little bit of patina never hurts anything.
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Old 05-08-2010, 04:45 AM   #10
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Got it working on some Barramundi today.

1) The old flexible filleting knife is in serious danger of getting bounced out of the knife roll. The flat bevel sashimi not only skins nearly as well as the flexible knife but is much more useful in portioning the fish.

2) This is a case where bigger is better. If I were working in a fish restaurant I'd go for a 30cm+ blade. A longer blade would make it easier to keep the knife parallel to the cutting board when skinning, and if working with whole fillets there are going to be times when the additional length of blade will make the job a lot easier.
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