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Old 08-29-2008, 12:52 AM   #11
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Thanks, Buzz. I've been very impressed by most of the JWW laminates. As I have often joked about them, "First, they are actually Japanese..."

As I have played around with this knife (and to be sure, it is attractively priced) I cannot help but admit that I have had Hattori knives that did not cut as smoothly.

As our friend Dwade would point out, knives have to be thin to slice. And therein is most of the problem. When you finally get a knife down to a point where it slices effortlessly, you are treading with some some very delicate edges. Will they hold? Will the edge roll?

My love for laminates is simply their uncanny way to make thin edges perform in day-to-day service. I checked this edge after taking down the rind on that zuccini, and it felt like it came right off of the stone.

It still hasn't degraded.

(The best way to test a knife is simply to tell my wife the blade really performs--but not to oversell the idea. Leave the knife atop the bamboo board, and walk away. When I start to find the knife in the dirty dishes on a regular basis, I know that I have won her over.)
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Old 08-29-2008, 08:03 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Chico Buller View Post
As our friend Dwade would point out, knives have to be thin to slice. And therein is most of the problem. When you finally get a knife down to a point where it slices effortlessly, you are treading with some some very delicate edges. Will they hold? Will the edge roll?
Thin for sure, and polished. I am never happy with my personal knives unless they push cut paper effortlessly and the best way I've found to reach this level is stropping on charged, thin, hard leather. I treat the edge with respect so I don't fret about chipping or rolling. When sharpening for others, I apply a primary bevel far less acute so that they can bang away on them all they want.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Chico Buller View Post
(The best way to test a knife is simply to tell my wife the blade really performs--but not to oversell the idea. Leave the knife atop the bamboo board, and walk away. When I start to find the knife in the dirty dishes on a regular basis, I know that I have won her over.)
I solved the entire problem by having "his and hers" knives. Hers are laid out nicely in a drawer and mine are MagBloked on the wall or in the closet in boxes. She has a fear of using spooky edges (on big knives) anyhow so it works out great. Oddly enough, she uses a Fibrox handled Forschner 5" skinning knife for all sorts of duties and I thinned that one to 10 degrees with a 15 degree primary bevel. Go figure. She handles the short blade just fine but never did learn how to keep her fingers clear of a 240mm Gyuto edge.
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Old 08-29-2008, 11:59 AM   #13
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I've found to reach this level is stropping on charged, thin, hard leather.
While I am coming around to that idea, I like the burr-free edge provided by glaziers' glass. I do have a strop, with a light dab of paste about midway, and I'm using it more.

However, the debate is which strop is better. The convex boys like a firm strop placed down on a solid table. The V-grind and double-bevel cool kids, such as myself, like a free-hanging strop they can control.

But the more I sharpen the more and more I have come to believe that our future is in our past. There are swords in museums that outcut anything or anyone.

My choice has been to incorporate more and more Japanese polishing tools (or modern renditions) into my sharpening regimen.
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