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Old 01-09-2013, 05:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
you can sail it?

i was wondering what kind of quality could about a lb. of carbon steel be for only $8? you're probably right, s&p, but i am interested in getting a big cleaver so i'm gonna wait for stock pot's review.
My German made butcher's cleaver weighs about 2 lbs, is about 5/32" thick carbon steel with an apple seed / convex shaped edge , and has has a full tang handle with birch scales fastened with 3 pins. The weight provides adequate force by merely letting it drop without having to swing hard. Dexter still sells high carbon, made in USA, butcher tools.
Chinese cleavers typically have stick tangs with thin metal ferrules
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Old 01-10-2013, 01:53 PM   #12
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Stick tang

Yes, it has that and the thin metal ferule, too. Time will tell how it holds up (or not). For now I am using it for edge destroying tasks like cutting up corrugated cardboard boxes for recyling.
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Old 01-10-2013, 04:32 PM   #13
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Good edge taken

OK, the thing arrived just about as I was walking out the door to head up into the White Mountains for an overnight gig. Now that I'm back I have had a chance to get out my sharpening stones and really put an edge on it. Now, this is made of old fashioned carbon steel, not some high carbon stainless steel (entirely different metals). It took a quick and deadly edge (I have the cut on my finger to prove it, lol), like any good carbon steel will do. As I've said, I am using it for edge-destroying duties to see how it holds up. I am giving it the usual attention for this type of steel: frequent touch-ups on the butcher's steel, wash and dry after every use.

The handle, as others have pointed out, is far from high grade. But, remember- this thing cost $7.50. But that is a potential weak point that I will be watching closely. If it loosens up or falls apart or anything, I'll let you know.

I have also recently found similarly priced real carbon steel Chinese cleavers at Abel Kitchens (restaurant supply place).

At this point I would say that if you sharpen your own knives and you are curious about how good old fashioned carbon steel is (it's great), then this is an inexpensive way to find out. Another inexpensive way is to get some Old Hickory knives (Amazon, eBay, ACE Hardware), especially their boning knife. But they come fairly dull. You need to sharpen them before you use them.

I am often amused by how often people rave about new knives based mainly on how keen the factory edge is out of the box. That edge will dull. Then, and only then, when you go to sharpen it, will you find out how good the knife really is.
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Old 01-18-2013, 08:20 PM   #14
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Holding up

Update. It is holding its edge and the handle remains tight. I have been using it as much as possible. A blade like this is not good for everything, imo, but I use it where I can for cooking. I have also sliced up about a dozen corrugated cardboard boxes (well known edge detroyers) with no edge deterioration- it still slides through them like a hot knife through butter, after my initial touch up to the edge.

Again, all I have done is wash and dry after every use and run the edge along the butcher's steel before and after every use. I did the cardboard cutting because it has a lot of silicates in it and it is a well known abrasive, edge destroying thing.

$7.95. Not too shabby, so far.
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:44 PM   #15
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Final word for now

Another couple of weeks of using this cleaver for vegetable mincing, meat cutting and slicing up corrugated cardboard boxes for recycling and it is still holding its edge. It still goes through the corrugated cardboard like butter, for example. All I have done to the edge is to true it up on the butcher's steel.

So, my opinion is that this thing is not junk, by any means, and it is well worth the $7.50 I paid for it.

The handle is holding up, too, btw.
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Old 01-28-2013, 12:16 AM   #16
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thanks very much, stock pot. i think you've sold me on it.
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Old 01-28-2013, 07:57 AM   #17
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Given the employment situation in the US and decline of basic manufacturing capabilities, where I can afford it, I prefer to buy made in America (e.g. Fall River, MA and Titusville, PA).
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Old 01-28-2013, 08:34 AM   #18
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bought one years ago at a martin Yan demo. Probably wasnt the greatest quality, and im sure i paid too much, but it was my ' go to ' knife for a long time, until i decided to use it to crack open a coconut ( blade side first). Lets just say I learned a valuable lesson, and have not purchased another cleaver to replace the damaged on.
Next time heat the coconut up in the oven first.
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Old 01-28-2013, 08:38 AM   #19
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Given the employment situation in the US and decline of basic manufacturing capabilities, where I can afford it, I prefer to buy made in America (e.g. Fall River, MA and Titusville, PA).
i agree, but i've almost given up on looking for stuff that's made in america.

i'll have to look at dexter as you'd mentioned.
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Old 04-06-2013, 02:12 PM   #20
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For me the chinese cleaver is a great knife. Cheap, resistant and very very useful.
I use it for chopping, for picking (like a spatula), for bashing veggies on the chopping board, and for splitting light bones.

Even if I know that carbon steel is easier to sharpen and often more sharp, i always take stainless steel knife so that it is easier to clean

great thread for a great value knife
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