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Old 04-29-2013, 10:27 PM   #31
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Well by all indications my cleaver is Chinese and probably forged steel.

I have no idea if what that means in terms of strength, holding an edge, best sharpening method etc.

Its not all shiny and pretty but I think it has character and I've enjoyed using it.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:17 PM   #32
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Forging is a process. Picture a blacksmith with a hammer and anvil. It involves shaping steel with pressure. The process can make a stronger product. However, the content of the steel that is being forged will impact the strength/hardness/quality of the forged product. So if you forge the proper steel into a cleaver, it will take a sharp edge and hold it for a long time.

Bottom line, if its performance makes you happy, that's all you need.
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Old 04-30-2013, 01:15 AM   #33
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Thank you Andy,

I watched this PBS documentary on the making of a Samurai sword...

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient...rai-sword.html

and if I'm not mistaken the process for Damascus steel is similar in that it is folded repeatedly during forging.

What any of this has to do with Chinese cleavers is beyond me and it seems I'm off on another tangent.

Just curious about things y'know?

So, back on track...

Sharpening a Chinese cleaver



Martin Yan...





Helen Chen...




Khoan Vong...



A balloon for a cutting board? Now way you say? No ones that good right?...

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Old 05-03-2013, 04:16 AM   #34
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On the side of my screen ads pop up covering whatever subject is on the screen. For this one about cleavers, the ads are all about sharpening knives in my local area. I just noticed an ad for pro chefs to rent knives. Now I know knives are very expensive, but I have always thought that pro chefs treat them like they are made of 24K gold. And rightly so. They fit their hand as an extension of their fingers. They guard them as if they were in Fort Knox. So why in the world would any pro chef want to rent knives?
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Old 05-03-2013, 07:47 AM   #35
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Maybe to provide them to helpers for an event? Chefs that do catering might hire people as needed for private events.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:15 AM   #36
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Maybe to provide them to helpers for an event? Chefs that do catering might hire people as needed for private events.
Oh yeh. I didn't think of that. Not everyone can afford to have a personal array of expensive knives.
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Old 05-03-2013, 10:15 AM   #37
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a friend who owns a pub/restaurant in nyc rents his knives. he explains that it's just much easier to allow someone else keep them clean and sharp, and it keeps someone else in business.

even though they're not the prettiest things, the chefs love them, and the bartenders hate them.

all the bartenders need them for is slicing lemons and limes, but the go through the citrus, and fingers, and the occasional customer who "borrows" one for his steak at the bar like light sabres.
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Old 05-03-2013, 09:26 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie
On the side of my screen ads pop up covering whatever subject is on the screen. For this one about cleavers, the ads are all about sharpening knives in my local area. I just noticed an ad for pro chefs to rent knives. Now I know knives are very expensive, but I have always thought that pro chefs treat them like they are made of 24K gold. And rightly so. They fit their hand as an extension of their fingers. They guard them as if they were in Fort Knox. So why in the world would any pro chef want to rent knives?
I know what you mean Addie.

I lend tools of any kind to very very few people.

They are an extension of ourselves and as such deserve tender treatment and respect.

When I'm cooking away from home I bring along my own knives and anything else I think I might need for the job at hand.

If I get the feeling that my host might be offended by this I find a tactful way to assure them that I just didn't want to make their own tools unavailable to them.
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Old 05-04-2013, 04:57 PM   #39
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I know what you mean Addie.

I lend tools of any kind to very very few people.

They are an extension of ourselves and as such deserve tender treatment and respect.

When I'm cooking away from home I bring along my own knives and anything else I think I might need for the job at hand.

If I get the feeling that my host might be offended by this I find a tactful way to assure them that I just didn't want to make their own tools unavailable to them.
Thoughtful guest.
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