"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-05-2009, 07:30 PM   #11
Senior Cook
 
jpaulg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Brisbane, Qld, Australia
Posts: 208
Quote:
Originally Posted by PanchoHambre View Post
Ok I was looking through old threads and this one is the most applicable to my situation.

I have quite a few knives, a few good ones and quite a few not so good. Mostly the cheap ones are still allegedly "forged" they all REALLY need a sharpening.

I bought but never used a stone (2 sided) and a steel (cheap ones from the restaurant supply store)

I would like to be able to sharpen my own knives as bringing them all to Fante's will break the bank. and the cheap ones are certainly not worth the cost of sharpening.

Some are SS and Some are Carbon Steel

Some tips on getting started would be appreciated... I really don't need a collection of over sized butter knives.

The cheaper knives I don't really care about keeping pretty or hurting so I would start with them... If I cant get them to be useful I will just chuck them. But if I can get them sharp enough for basic use that would be nice because I dont always like to worry about treating things nicely sometimes it is easier to have things I am not afraid to bang around a but.

The Whustof Santoku and the vintage Sabatier I am more hesitant to touch.... The Whustof has held its edge nicely despite quite a bit of use but it is getting duller. The Sabatier is an old carbon steel knife I picked up.. I have never used it but I would like to.

Thanks
A few pointers that helped me when I was learning the skill
- Your ears are the best guide to tell you if you're using the stone correctly. You want to be grinding metal off the edge, not sliding it over the stone.
- Use the whole length of the stone and sharpen from tip to heel evenly.
- Speed comes with time, be prepared to take it slowly to ensure that you have consistency when you're learning.
- Consistency of angle is the single most important thing.
- The 'countdown' method takes longer but produces better edges.

For me I find it takes about 3 months to get a new knife into the shape that I want it where it takes and holds the edge consistently. I'll grind a new edge onto it then use it for a week, lightly sharpen, use it for a week, lightly sharpen etc. It seems to be a case of repeatedly taking 2 steps forward and one step back gets the best results for me.

Don't be afraid of the santoku, I find that they are very easy knives to sharpen because they have a relatively short blade and no bolster. For some reason I always find Sabatiers the most difficult to sharpen.
__________________

__________________
jpaulg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 09:17 PM   #12
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Philly PA
Posts: 702
thanks for the tips. I would like to be able to do this myself...we'll see
__________________

__________________
PanchoHambre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 10:24 PM   #13
Head Chef
 
Leolady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Kansas
Posts: 1,418
Quote:
Originally Posted by PanchoHambre View Post
The Whustof Santoku and the vintage Sabatier I am more hesitant to touch.... The Sabatier is an old carbon steel knife I picked up.. I have never used it but I would like to.
Thanks
I have a big case of vintage carbon steel Sabatier knives and I love them they sharpen easily and stay sharp. I think you will like them too.

Just dive on in there. The coarse side first, then the fine side. You will be able to see which part you are sharpening because it will be brighter.
__________________
The luster of shiny new appliances can't compete with the virtues of Vintage: namely durability, simplicity, superior cooking and a cool retro look. http://leoladyshousecollectiblesandg....blogspot.com/
http://leoladysw.blogspot.com/
Leolady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2009, 12:33 PM   #14
Senior Cook
 
DrThunder88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 473
Permanent marker is also helpful in showing low areas and maintaining a consistent edge.

There's no easy way to freehand sharpen (though some ways are easier than others), so the only way to become proficient is to practice. That means going slowly in the beginning until the strokes become consistent. I posted a video of a guy using inclined stone in another thread. I find it's much easier for me to obtain a constant bevel that way.
__________________
DrThunder88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2009, 10:02 PM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2
diamond sharpening steels

Hello, I find many average people dont understand the
technique when using a sharpening steel or honing steel. Sounds like you have a honing steel. Have you ever considered a diamond sharpening steel. I find they are easy to store in a drawer and they work great. For a video on proper use:
see ergo chef's web site under sharpening steels

Any further questions I will be glad to help
__________________
cheftoolz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2009, 11:15 PM   #16
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheftoolz View Post

Any further questions I will be glad to help
Cheftoolsz - I posted and then deleted because I thought it would be prudent to first explore your kind offer to check out the Ergo site so I did. The video is about the line of Ergo knives with a short piece on the steel at the end. Are you connected with them in any way? With a moniker like cheftoolz my gut feeling is that your post is the beginning of a Cutco-like come on. Correct?
__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 12:58 PM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 2
Not cutco

I am not like Cutco. If thats your impresion, your quite mistaken.
I was just trying to offer my help.
I am affiliated with Ergo Chef, Just trying to show how simple it is to use a Diamond sharpening steel. It's not rocket science and if you watched the video you should get enouph from it to do it. Just have to practice a few times.
Lets keep the Door to Door Cutco people out of it.
__________________
cheftoolz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 02:02 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheftoolz View Post
I am not like Cutco. If thats your impresion, your quite mistaken.
I was just trying to offer my help.
I am affiliated with Ergo Chef, Just trying to show how simple it is to use a Diamond sharpening steel. It's not rocket science and if you watched the video you should get enouph from it to do it. Just have to practice a few times.
Lets keep the Door to Door Cutco people out of it.
Okay, then I'll address diamond steels directly. They cut too fast. They remove too much metal, especially with soft knives like Ergos with edges that roll and need to be realigned with a glass smooth steel. The diamond steels take away metal that can be used again and again and again before needing to be resharpened. I'll also endorse ceramic steels like the Idahone 10 or 12 inch "fine" (1200 grit). It removes much less metal than diamonds and also works well with harder steels such as found on Japanese knives.
__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 02:29 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
DrThunder88's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Metro Detroit
Posts: 473
I agree with Buzzard. I do use a coarse DMT DiaSharp plate to set the edge angle on new knives, but from there on up it's all ceramic. I have a borosilicate rod from McMaster-Carr that I'll use for steeling as soon as I'm able to make a handle for it.
__________________
DrThunder88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 03:02 PM   #20
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrThunder88 View Post
I agree with Buzzard. I do use a coarse DMT DiaSharp plate to set the edge angle on new knives, but from there on up it's all ceramic. I have a borosilicate rod from McMaster-Carr that I'll use for steeling as soon as I'm able to make a handle for it.
Dr, I have a 15" HandAmerican borosilicate rod but didn't bring boron into the mix as I thought it would confuse things unnecessarily. Now that it's out of the bag though, the boro rod, which is the model divided into opposing quarters, two smooth and two microgrooved, is my steel of choice for soft steel, and my Idahone fine ceramic steel is used for my Japanese blades. They work so well that I haven't used my glass smooth steel in a year. Confusing????
__________________

__________________
Buzz

"There are only two kinds of people that understand Marines: Marines and those who have met them in battle. Everyone else has a second-hand opinion." Unknown
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.