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Old 05-06-2007, 10:40 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mylegsbig
Honing your knives with a sharpening steel to maintain the edge is one thing,

but actually sharpening them yourself is not as cut and dry as this sounds, there is skill involved...i would definitely do far more research before you decide to sharpen your own knives, especially if they are high end
Yes, there is skill involved, but it's not so much an "Art" as it is just shear repetition to train your wrist to maintain the proper angle of the blade on the stone. I received the bulk of my training in knife sharpening when I was just a kid in the Boy Scouts. When I went to college for Culinary Arts, they ran us through a bit of training on knife care, but for me, it was just a refresher.
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Old 05-06-2007, 10:44 AM   #12
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For me personally, i'd rather spend like 30 bucks a year getting all my knives sharpened by a craftsman than risk ruining a 150+ dollar knife. Ive heard conflicting reports of the degree of difficulty involved, also, some people are naturally more skilled with their hands than others. It just seems for the average layman with a nice set of knives, it makes more sense to take them out once a year than to learn the craft.


Ive heard arguments from both sides of the fence however, i think it is not a black and white issue, you have to figure out if it is personally the thing for you.

cheers

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Old 05-07-2007, 12:18 AM   #13
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Different strokes for different folks. Heck, even some cooks I've worked with prefer to have their knives sharpened by a "professional" knife sharpener. I'm kind of quirky about my knives; I don't like other people messing with the bevel and over-all sharpness of my blades.

On the flip side, I can't really repair my vehicles of all ailments. I can change the oil, and the spark plugs on one of them (front-w-d 4 cyl), but the v-6 van will have to be taken in, as I can't get to the back three plugs. Some folks can rebuild cars in their backyard. Not I.
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Old 05-07-2007, 11:14 AM   #14
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sharpening your knives

I see that this can be an issue for some.I have been sharpening knives this way since I first started cooking at home.I was taught by my grandfather who believed that you should be able to keep your tools sharp and ready for use. I was shown again by a very accomplished chef some years later when I was cooking proffesionally. It is one of those things that should at least be tried, very few people find it impossible. I have had knives sharpened proffesionally (not my own) and had to spend more time on them myself as they where not very good.I find trying this with a cheaper softer blade the easiest way to learn as things happen quicker.I have looked for a basic video of this on the net but they are all a bit iffy so far.
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Old 05-07-2007, 11:35 AM   #15
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I was afeard of home sharpening fer sure myself. But I did teach myself without ruining any knives or bleeding to death. And I use a diamond hone and a steel. I have a stone if I need it. (And a pro in the county if I ever mess up but that's not likely now.) read up on it the internet. THe equipment is not expensive. get a protractor and find on your thumb where 20* is! and keep it there! now pull towards you in a banana arc ... then reverse and do it left handed! piece a cake, slice a pie, and only frightening until you do it a few times. But the diamond hone (even easier to use but still remember 20* on your thumb) will be used much more often. Practice on a cheap blade.
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:45 AM   #16
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Anyone know any places to get a good empty knife block? I'm putting together my own set.

Only good one I found was nylon based but very $$$
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Old 05-13-2007, 10:52 AM   #17
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Just keep checking the kitchenware websites.

I prefer a magnetic strip on the wall where I do my prep work. You can hang any size knives and they are out of the way and don't take up counter space.
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Old 05-13-2007, 05:32 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dispute
Anyone know any places to get a good empty knife block? I'm putting together my own set.

Only good one I found was nylon based but very $$$
Search Amazon.com for "knife block" and you will see dozens of different styles by major knife manufacturers and many more. Ebay also has way too many, including exotic blocks of wood for making your own knife holder.
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Old 05-13-2007, 07:29 PM   #19
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Do a search on froogle.com.
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