"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-03-2005, 03:39 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 3
Question Vintage carbon steel knives

I have a set of vintage carbon steel dinner knives which are badly in need of a cleaning from tarnish and marks. Any suggestions on how to clean and restore them?

__________________

__________________
yellow car is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2005, 10:07 PM   #2
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Don't know what kind of marks you have, or what kind of tarnishing you're talking about. But, this falls into the catagory of a "self evident" truth - if you had the equipment to do it youself you wouldn't be asking. And, I don't mean that in a flippant way.

Check your local phonebook for knife stores ... call and talk to them. If you don't have any knife stores try talking to antique dealers. They will be able to help you find someone that can restore your knives.
__________________

__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2005, 11:33 PM   #3
Cook
 
eric's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Southern California
Posts: 74
Send a message via AIM to eric Send a message via Yahoo to eric
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellow car
I have a set of vintage carbon steel dinner knives which are badly in need of a cleaning from tarnish and marks. Any suggestions on how to clean and restore them?
They are also illegal to use in commerical kitchens in NY. But who checks anyway right? I worked with a French guy with a carbon knife, they were sharp as heck!! He didn't care "deport me" he used to say.

But they stain a lot of food -- artichokes, eggs, stuff like that. Gives it a weird taste too.
__________________
--
Eric

eric is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2005, 09:59 AM   #4
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
I'm with Michael. Don't know where I'd start here, but when I lived in FL I knew of a guy who had a travelling knife sharpening business that must have had some kind of certification (he sharpened instruments used in high-end vet care as well as your kitchen knives). I'd hand them over to him. With a good stone and knowledge he could clean them up and get them sharp. So, if you're really attached to those knives, start some research. I have some vintage forks that I simply clean using CLR occaisionally. Don't use them often, they're more a conversation peice (been in hubby's family for a few generations), but the tarnish never killed anyone (and believe me, many people ate of them for many years, tarnished!).
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2005, 05:32 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kitchenelf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 19,725
Send a message via MSN to kitchenelf
yellow car - don't know what I can add either - if there is any kind of rust on them white vinegar saturated on a paper towel should get the rust off - have you tried a good silver cleaner?

I don't know how else to help you either except to give the same advice - find someone you can ask who is familiar with restoring these.
__________________
kitchenelf

"Count yourself...you ain't so many" - quote from Buck's Daddy
kitchenelf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2005, 11:13 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 3
Thanks. I have recently tried a product called Astonish on them and they don't sparkle and do react to most foods by the end of a meal. They are useable. Thanks again.
yellowcar
__________________
yellow car is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2005, 08:35 PM   #7
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 66
Carbon steel is reactive. Good carbon steel darkens in reaction to acids and oxidizers in food. Rust of course is an oxidation process too, but in the first case you get FeO3, a "black rust" and in the second case you get FeO2, a "red rust."

Black rust is stable and durable. also, if oiled (cooking oil or grease from meats will do fine) black oxide "sets" and stabilizes the surface of the steel -- helping to prevent further rust.

A fine carbon steel knife will and rightly should develop a fine, blue/grey/black patina. You don't want to remove this surface. It's a desirable trait of a fine carbon steel blade.

Nonetheless, carbon steel blades discolor some foods -- eggs for example. I've never had a problem with fish, but I suppose fish might discolor from a reactive carbon blade.

Daphne duLibre is an online name -- It's a pun on a classic European bike race, the Dauphine du Libre. I'm a guy. My knife knowledge comes from a huge collection of hunting, utility, pocket knives, tool steel, and firearms finishes.

I have an old Case 8" French, and a Sabbatier with carbon blades, as well as a sizable collection of carbon blade pocket, hunting, utility knives.
__________________
Daphne duLibre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 12:16 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Oceanside, Ca
Posts: 26
Send a message via ICQ to R Hill


Hi all,

I agree with Daphne:
"A fine carbon steel knife will and rightly should develop a fine, blue/grey/black patina."

I own quite a few (over 15) of carbon steel knifes that I have used over 40 years, the most I have ever used on them is a little barkeepers with a sponge ever couple of years. Most of the time all that is needed is to wipe them clean/dry after use and store them lightly oiled. I have never a problem with rust and I live only few miles from the ocean.

You could shave with my knifes 40 years ago and you can do the same today. Nothing beats a Carbon Steel knife for looks or a fine edge.


Clean/Dry and lightly oiled is the key.
__________________
R Hill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2009, 06:18 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
GrillingFool's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: usa
Posts: 2,223
Go buy yourself a sponge/scrubbie with a green scrubbie pad.. the
"heavy duty" scrubbie.
Use this with good elbow grease and some soap on the blades (carefully),
and it should remove most if not all of the discolorations.

I use a 1957 Case XX-400 Carbon steel knife regularly, and it stays bright and shiny with just a little scrubbie when needed.
__________________
GrillingFool is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:46 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 1
Red face cleaning DINNER KNIVES

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellow car View Post
I have a set of vintage carbon steel dinner knives which are badly in need of a cleaning from tarnish and marks. Any suggestions on how to clean and restore them?

hello, i have the same issue w/ my antique dinner knives which have carbon steel blades. dinner knives are a different thing than hunting or cooking knives since guests who don't know the difference are using them to eat, so they must appear cleaner than knives used in other situations. i use very fine steel wool with a strong metal cleaner on the blades, then polish them w/ stainless steel appliance cleaner and rinse w/ hot water. then, dry them very well. (do not do this on silver handles.) a light grey finish is retained but they are shined up a bit more. they will never be completely shiney like new knives since you want them to build a protective patina. &, you'll just have to explain to your guests that, no, the knives are not dirty, they are clean but an old type of metal which was even used for swords...
__________________

__________________
polosharky is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.