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Old 10-08-2010, 01:46 AM   #51
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
If you always use an end grain wood cutting board, or carefully use a decent plastic one, then you won't dull it very fast at home. If you were to use the yellow Edgemaker Pro (the honer) maybe once or twice a month you'd never need to do much else. While you can use the steel that it comes with you'd be way better off with the Edgemaker Pro. And it's only $10 with free shipping. Sure, it would be a good idea to get the complete set but if you don't let your knife get super dull you'll never need much more than the yellow honer.

I think you'll really like the Wusthof. It's a good quality knife. And their warranty service is top notch. If you ever have a problem they'll fix or replace the knife, pretty much forever. Plus, they've been around for a couple hundred years so I'd consider them a safe bet.
Isnt the warranty against "defects". So as long as I recieve the knife and its in tact since its not exactly an electronics item, thats it? Or do they cover accidental breakage from regular use and such things like that.

Thanks for the reply though, Thats probably exactly what I will do
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:25 AM   #52
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i cant comment on their specific warranty, but a knife defect might not be readily apparent from just a visual inspection.....a poor temper could lead to breakage down the line, and you would never know about it until the tip snaps off.....if you ever do have a problem, definitely give them a call....they might ask to see the knife (it will most likely be obvious if the knife was abused), but i bet they would just fix or replace it with no real hassle....knives dont break often, so dont lose much sleep over this
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:30 AM   #53
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Their warranty is for manufacturer's defects. Pretty much all warranties are. As noodle said, if it's not from abuse or accident, they will honor the warranty.

For something like a knife, I never gave a thought to a warranty. I wouldn't make warranty a significant factor in knife selection. There are no moving parts and it's not likely to have a manufacturing defect. That's a different approach from how I feel about warranties on electrical appliances, etc.
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Old 10-08-2010, 03:35 PM   #54
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In practical terms I've neve seen Wustof fail to honor a warranty claim, no matter the reason. Perhaps in cases of obvious abuse they would refuse, but I've seen them replace knives that have been broken opening cans! They seem to err on the side of generousity.
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Old 10-24-2010, 07:26 PM   #55
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So I just wanted to update you guys... I love the choice Ive made. The cheap block set is useful with so many knives because for something quick O can quickly use one of them or use the scissors that are right there and handy in the block. Then for most of the things I use the wustoff knife and it is absolutely great. Both me and my GF love it and thinks its comfortable. My GF definitely noticed the difference in sharpness when she was using it to cut potatoes.

The only complaint is how long the initial sharpness lasted. When the knife came it was so sharp that if i put it up against my fingertip and moved it just a cm, it would already start cutting into my skin. Now, it is still sharp by all means(way sharper than the cheap one that came with the woodblock set) but not as sharp to do that. Is this normal? I tried using the steel that came with the block on it, but from my understanding that is just to even out any inconsistencies in the edge and not to actually make it razor sharp anyways. Might be time to buy that sharpener kit you guys recommended.


So in conclusion, for anyone reading this thread and in the same scenario. I definitely recommend buying a cheap block set and one good chef's knife.
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Old 10-24-2010, 09:01 PM   #56
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Yeah, it's normal. Those knives are made of relatively soft steel that won't hold a super keen edge for very long. But they should retain a useful level of sharpness for a good while if you treat them properly.
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Old 11-04-2010, 12:32 PM   #57
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a week or so ago, the knife got to the point of really dull. Obviously still sharper then piece of crap knives, but when cutting harder things like potatoes my GF was having a hard time. So I put it against the steel and it made it ALOT better for now.
Today I ordered the edgemaker pro set of 4. So where should I start off on the set with? From my understanding I definitely will not need to use the blue semi-course. How do I know whether to start off from the medium,fine or ultra fine grit?
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Old 11-04-2010, 05:04 PM   #58
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There are a couple of good tutorials on the Edgemaker site. Worth taking a look.
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Old 11-05-2010, 03:57 AM   #59
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Yeah, there are some good tutorial vids on the site. You might be able to use just the yellow, but if it's too far gone for that then drop down to the next grit. If that doesn't work (when performed with the correct technique) then drop down one more. As a general rule of thumb, always use the finest set that will still do the job- you will waste less metal and extend the life of your blade that way.

Once your knife is acceptably sharp you should rarely, if ever, need to go coarser than the finest set of rods. Just give it a few light passes occasionally just as you would with a steel.
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