"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-15-2009, 08:18 AM   #11
Head Chef
 
Adillo303's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Haledon, New Jersey
Posts: 1,072
Send a message via AIM to Adillo303
What sharp means to me is that when I take a knife out to cut something, I run it on the steel (I have a very old smooth steel about 16" long that was in the house when I bought it. I don't use a ribbed steel) and when I cut something I want if to happen with lieelt effort. I do not want to feel like I am forcing the cut.

Just one time, I would like to experience one of those Scary, tosty or whatever else the big guys call them knives. I just do nto think that degree of sharpness is practical for my kitchen. Hey, dosen't everyone want to drive a Prosche Turbo Carrera one time?

I have wanted to take my own knives along many times. I go to someone's house for a nice holliday dinner and offer to help. Someone tells me to cut the meat, I reach in the drawer and pull out, what was the experssion on another thread? Something sharp as a bananna. You are left with no choice, but, t hack away and end up with something that yo are not proud of. At home I can make 1/16" cuts off a piece of meat if I choose to, comfortably. A nice job of cutting the meat is, as fas as I am concerned, part of the presentation.

I hope that I am not hijacking, if I am, tell me to shut up. so often, I hear mention o fthe angles that knives are sharpened at. Buzzard767 has given the most understandable information that I have read to date. Is ther some place to look, or could someone post here, just what angles are appropriate for what uses. If 2 angles are used, what ones.

TIA - AC
__________________

__________________
One difference between a cook and a chef is that the cook mows the lawn, while the bread is rising.
Adillo303 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2009, 10:49 AM   #12
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie E View Post

One of my brothers used a table knife to slice a baguette during the Christmas holidays. Do I need to tell you how the bread looked?
That reminds me of something I forgot to mention Katie. Thanks. A very sharp Gyuto or Western Chef's knife in the 240 to 270mm range will produce a knife that will cut bread and slice meat at a minimum of 95% of the ability of dedicated bread knives and meat slicers. I have a Mac SB-150 bread knife which slices bread with the best of them yet my Gyutos almost do the same quality job. I am convinced that all that is needed in the kitchen is a peeler, a parer, a boneing knife, and a Chef's knife. It really helps if the Chef's knife is very thin. These come from Takeda, Moritaka, Suisin, Tadatsuna, and a few others. They don't come cheap, but because you can save a little by not having to buy more knives plus the fact that the edge retention is several times that of inexpensive knives makes them worthwhile to me.

Buzz
__________________

__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2009, 10:50 AM   #13
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adillo303 View Post
I hope that I am not hijacking, if I am, tell me to shut up. so often, I hear mention o fthe angles that knives are sharpened at. Buzzard767 has given the most understandable information that I have read to date. Is ther some place to look, or could someone post here, just what angles are appropriate for what uses. If 2 angles are used, what ones.

TIA - AC
It depends. What knives do you have and what do you use them for?

Buzz
__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2009, 11:04 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
It's like that line from the Meatloaf song Paradise by the Dashboard light:
"Glowing like the metal on the edge of a knife"

Whoever wrote that line was a knife sharpener.
That would be Jim Steinman. lol

Maybe he would have recieved more recognition as a knife sharpener, rather than a composer.

He also wrote for Bonnie Tyler.

Jim Steinman - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2009, 11:32 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Cicero, IL
Posts: 5,093
Yea, he penned some way wicked songs, and I love how Meatloaf belts em out!
__________________
Maverick2272 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2009, 11:37 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 4,630
I actually have is CD home. Not too bad, but I don't take it out in public. lol
__________________
Jeekinz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2009, 05:48 AM   #17
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
That reminds me of something I forgot to mention Katie. Thanks. A very sharp Gyuto or Western Chef's knife in the 240 to 270mm range will produce a knife that will cut bread and slice meat at a minimum of 95% of the ability of dedicated bread knives and meat slicers. I have a Mac SB-150 bread knife which slices bread with the best of them yet my Gyutos almost do the same quality job. I am convinced that all that is needed in the kitchen is a peeler, a parer, a boneing knife, and a Chef's knife.
I've had that discussion with Chico; while I agree with you for home cooking I think a serrated is a near-essential for bread in a professional setting. Sure a sharp gyuto will cut a loaf of bread perfectly...but will it cut 300 loaves of crusty batard in a few hours?
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2009, 06:39 AM   #18
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
I've had that discussion with Chico; while I agree with you for home cooking I think a serrated is a near-essential for bread in a professional setting. Sure a sharp gyuto will cut a loaf of bread perfectly...but will it cut 300 loaves of crusty batard in a few hours?
Never tried it, Rob, and never will. You?

Buzz
__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2009, 05:44 PM   #19
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
I dunno. I don't do banquet work anymore, at least not right now. Until about two years ago I did a lot of it but I went back to school (I'm in my 3rd semester, studying for my degree in Computer Information Systems). Until I graduate I'll still work as a cook, but probably won't have much occasion to cut that much batard. Still, the company I used to Chef for is opening a new restaurant near me, and I think I'll probably be working there once they open. They serve a lot of batard even though they won't do catering.

A crusty bagette is quite a challenge for a non-serrated knife. Undoubtedly Chico's edges would make short work of them but I wonder if that 300th loaf would cut as easy as the first.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2009, 05:49 PM   #20
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
To clarify and elaborate on what I discussed with Chico, my last Chef gig was as Sous Chef of a hotel & restaurant where we had a banquet facility with a capacity of about 2,000. On a busy weekend we might do 1,000 meals in a day. Sometimes we used petit pains (small bagettes that are dinner roll sized) but just as often we used very crusty batard loaves that we sliced and placed in baskets. When we did the latter it wouldn't be unusual to go thru hundreds of loaves. Fresh French bread has a pretty hard crust and many knives just skate off of them. Serrated knives are universally used in this setting.

That said, I would like to give it a try. Chico was always pretty confident that a sharp edge would do the job, no serrations required.
__________________

__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.