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Old 01-16-2009, 06:30 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Babcock View Post
I've had that discussion with Chico; while I agree with you for home cooking I think a serrated is a near-essential for bread in a professional setting. Sure a sharp gyuto will cut a loaf of bread perfectly...but will it cut 300 loaves of crusty batard in a few hours?
I'm with Rob on this one. I've used my Sabatier on slicing crusty ciabata, it's fine for the first couple of slices but the edge noticably blunted after a dozen or so loaves, and honing wasn't bringing the edge back.
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Old 01-16-2009, 06:52 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by jpaulg View Post
I'm with Rob on this one. I've used my Sabatier on slicing crusty ciabata, it's fine for the first couple of slices but the edge noticably blunted after a dozen or so loaves, and honing wasn't bringing the edge back.
Most likely correct, both you and Rob. I only have to do a few slices at a time so am limited in experience.
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Old 01-17-2009, 01:56 PM   #23
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Hey Buzz, about that Lansky system....

..while I can achieve a very sharp edge, it's tedious to say the least. Also, knives past 6" seems best to do half the blade and change the center clamp. If I clamp in the center for an 8" blade, it bends toward the point. Pretty good system, but it wears me out. I might pony up for the EP.
So, that being said, have you tried Stack 'n Tilt ?
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Old 01-17-2009, 02:24 PM   #24
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So, that being said, have you tried Stack 'n Tilt ?
Yuk yuk. Sure, for abut three months last Spring. I've tried everything. Lately I've been setting up with about 2/3 of the weight on the left side. The shift on the back swing becomes readily apparent yet there is no tendency to sway. I don't know why that is but my divot depth is much more consistent.

If you get the EP, you'll love it. Short learning curve, great results.
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Old 01-17-2009, 05:26 PM   #25
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No sway

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Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
The shift on the back swing becomes readily apparent yet there is no tendency to sway.
Must be fewer moving parts. What isn't apparent, at first, is the pressure on your left knee. You know you keep your weight on the left side for wedge shots, it's just a little harder for long irons. However, the fewer parts you move the more consistantly you strike the ball. That business of moving all that weight to your right side isn't translated very well for most. I'm still experimenting. We really should include knife talk, so, do you slice? Do you like forged or cast implements?
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Old 01-17-2009, 07:58 PM   #26
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We really should include knife talk, so, do you slice? Do you like forged or cast implements?
No slicing and few controlled fades. I'm more of a bread hooker. Most of my present implements are forged. Not that it makes any difference. You still have to get the chicken in the pot, no matter what it takes. I try hard to make most of my dishes as close to parboiled as possible. One of my favs is of course Mulligan stew....
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Old 01-18-2009, 12:22 AM   #27
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* Shudders in his chair....

I've got to print those off and take them in to work. Some of the folks there actually do appreciate golf jokes....
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Old 01-21-2009, 01:49 PM   #28
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What's sharp to me? Good question.

I was thinking my 8" utility needed sharpening. Then I boned a roast, don't recall needing to do a whole lot of slicing, or sawing, or anything. Fact is it went through the meat without much effort at all.

So even dull seems sharp enough. I should still take a stone to it ... I'm not as anal as many of you folks, but then I do work at home so thats a different perspective, from where I'm at I will say 'sharp' is where the knife does the work and without using so much force as to make using the knife dangerous. Like I say, different perspective, my Carpel came from using wrenches, not knives.


About taking knives someplace else, many people see bringing your own knife into their kitchen as an insult. Specially people like my Mother. So I'm ove ar Moms for New Years dinner, dig through two or more drawers piled with knives, Suppose to slice the pork but it comes out in shredded slabs, Ma says how she guesses she should get a sharp knife, I mention how I was thinking of bringing the slicer and BANG , Moms off to the races!
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