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Old 05-13-2005, 11:29 PM   #11
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Here is a good place to start.

http://www.knifesearch.com/mysql/mys...rchword=dagger
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Old 05-14-2005, 12:38 AM   #12
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Santoku vs. Chef Knife

The following sub-article is from Cooks Illustrated:

And the Winner Is . . .
While testers liked most of the santokus, only two—the MAC and the Kershaw Shun—were consistently preferred over the Forschner chef’s knife in the tests. But given how much we like the Forschner (and the fact that many chef’s knives are inferior to this brand), the santokus certainly held their own. But you could argue that our tests were rigged in favor of the santokus. In preliminary testing, we tried to halve acorn squashes, and only a couple of the santokus could manage this basic task. The blades were simply too thin and too short. We also avoided cutting up a whole chicken because manufacturers warned that santoku blades were too thin to cut through bone. A chef’s knife can handle both of these chores easily.

Is the era of the chef’s knife at an end? No. The chef’s knife is more versatile than the santoku. If you are going to have only one type of knife in your kitchen, it should be a chef’s knife. That said, our testers felt that the santoku is indeed better at precision slicing: The blade is shorter, thinner, and easier to manage. Stick with the chef’s knife for more substantial tasks.

We heartily recommend the MAC Superior Santoku knife—it performed well and was one of the cheapest models tested. But use this santoku to complement—not to replace—your chef’s knife.
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Old 05-14-2005, 11:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
all of her stuff is advertised on FoodTV.

the knife they sell at food tv is not the one she uses. its the cheaper gourmet series offered at a grand prix price. dont buy it there.


NEVER buy a knife just because of someone eles's review or recommendation. It's VERY important to actually hold the knife in you own hand and try it before you buy it.
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Old 05-14-2005, 12:50 PM   #14
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They have a bunch of them on ebay for about $50 which is about $30 less than william sonoma.
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Old 05-14-2005, 04:16 PM   #15
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My opinion is that german knife makers are fine for traditional knives but asian knives need to be made my asian knife makers with their own steel. That's why i steered away from all the german made Santoku's and bought a Kershaw Shun.




Hattori makes the ones I REALLY want for a bit more than i can pay right now.



and here's a real gem for $1200



If you decide against a Santoku, a Gyuto (like a traditional chef's knife) is the way to go. The $1200 knife is more of a Gyuto rather than a Santoku.
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Old 05-14-2005, 05:25 PM   #16
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This is my favorite knife J.A Henckels Professional S 8", it is big and the handle is good for a mans hand it is riveted and should last a lifetime, the blade is heavy, the heavy blades hold their edge and sharpen well. It is great for meat, if you do alot of trimming and meat work a deboning knife is great, if you don't allready have one that is. Happy shopping
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Old 05-14-2005, 05:40 PM   #17
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A few years ago when I was restocking my kitchen after my divorce... I joined a couple of knife forums to do some research.. one was knifeforums.com as I recall, I forget the other one (I lost my bookmarks)... Anyway

I read their "kitchen" sections.. and did some other research.. bought myself some knives... what I got isn't important to this conversation.

Later, I needed a wedding gift for a friend in my office... and went back to research knives. One specific knife was recommended a few times as the "best buy in the world" type of raves... So I checked out the site and couldn't believe the prices... anyway, I bought four or five of these knives for my friend as a wedding present... when I was wrapping them I couldn't believe how nice they were.. I have a bunch of Japanese knives myself.. all of them costing WAY too much by community standards ... and I was thinking "rats (not really but the word I want to use produces those funny star thingys), I should have got a few of them for myself".. but I don't need any more knives...

At the wedding, my friend & new bride got a really nice set of Henckels 4-star knives (not my favorite but a really nice German knife) in a classy looking oak block and I shook my head 'cause they went all hysterical over the Henckels... then they opened up my present with the Japanese knives.. The/many Japanese knives are strange in that they only have one bevel.. (i.e. only one side is sharpened) so they have "right handed" knives as normal stock... "left handed" knives can be special ordered... My friends said "how quaint", thanked me and tossed them in their box.

Punch line is, a few weeks later I asked them what they did with all the knives they got... they said they took the Henckels back to the store where they were purchased... and are using and LOVING the Japanese knives I got for them.. they bought a wood block for them (horizontal.. cause you never want to store a knife on it's edge) and I couldn't pry any of them out of his wife's hands if I tried....

So.. if anyone is considering a GREAT quality knife at a bargain basement, best "bang for the buck" price.. check out the link I provide below... these knives come so sharp you can just look at a tomato and it almost slices itself. I noticed they have a Santoku that I'll bet performs as well or probably better than the Mac Santoku.. worth a look anyway.
http://www.japanese-knife.com/Mercha...ory_Code=HFU-F
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Old 05-14-2005, 07:32 PM   #18
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My husband bought me a Santoku for about $60, I think, and it has become my favorite big knife. The shape makes it easier to balance the knife on it's point and rock, and it's shorter length makes it easier to control, for me at least.
My daughter always teased that it wasn't a meal until mom sliced her finger, but lately (knock on wood) I haven't left nearly as much skin on the cutting block as before.
Maybe it's because I've learned to tuck my fingers under when I slice, but I think the new knife has made a difference too.
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Old 05-14-2005, 08:26 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janetGood
This is my favorite knife J.A Henckels Professional S 8", it is big and the handle is good for a mans hand it is riveted and should last a lifetime, the blade is heavy, the heavy blades hold their edge and sharpen well. It is great for meat, if you do alot of trimming and meat work a deboning knife is great, if you don't allready have one that is. Happy shopping
I've got that exact knife, a henkels 8". Man that thing is good... I havent sharpened it once since I bought it and it's getting ready for it's first sharpen (after like 2 years).
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Old 05-15-2005, 06:52 PM   #20
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man i LOVE the look of the Kershaw Shun Santoku...

does anyone else have one of these? any reviews or opinions on them???

do you think id have to internet order the kershaw shun or they may have it at a cutlery store here in san antonio?

Cheers
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