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Old 12-28-2016, 02:15 AM   #21
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Oh I sharpen my bread knife, I have it professionally sharpen after Christmas every year.
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:33 AM   #22
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I've been successfully using bread knife that came in the box of bread machine for the last 12-13 years now. It has no name, no markings of any kind. I'm sure it was some cheap knife the company that produced bread machine could find and yet it works just fine. If you really want something fancy, go to cooking store, see which Japanese knife fits your hand the best and buy it. It will less you a life time.


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Old 12-28-2016, 06:35 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
Oh I sharpen my bread knife, I have it professionally sharpen after Christmas every year.

Bread knife?


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Old 12-28-2016, 02:17 PM   #24
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Cooks Illustrated likes the Mercer. Scroll down to view the knife.

https://www.cooksillustrated.com/buy...=cioindexpromo
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Old 12-28-2016, 03:12 PM   #25
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Charlie; yes the guy who does my bread knife has the right type of sharpener. Also mine doesnt have those tiny teethed bladed but the larger teeth.


How to Sharpen a Bread Knife (or any Serrated Knife) with Ease - Sharpen Up
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Old 12-28-2016, 06:19 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
The one that feels most comfortable in your hand is a place to start.
And I can only add the one that works for you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunky View Post
Hi, what I am looking for is a specific knife that people have used and are recommending. I presume this has been previously decided on the forum.

Thanks

I can give you a specific knife but no brand or type of edge.

To me this is the best bread knife ever.

Click image for larger version

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It's ancient but it works like a charm and can slice bread paper thin if that's what you desire.

Been in the family for longer then I know but I'd be heartbroken if I ever had to live without it.
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:29 AM   #27
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Quote:
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And I can only add the one that works for you.




I can give you a specific knife but no brand or type of edge.

To me this is the best bread knife ever.

Attachment 25924

Attachment 25925

It's ancient but it works like a charm and can slice bread paper thin if that's what you desire.

Been in the family for longer then I know but I'd be heartbroken if I ever had to live without it.
You better get a tetanus shot before using that knife
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:37 AM   #28
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Zagut; what about cleaning caring for beloved friend? That is the type of tiny teeth that cant be sharpened, if they ever got dull.

But yes, that is a rusty knife and doesnt looks safe to use.
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Old 12-29-2016, 05:00 AM   #29
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I have this knife: Offset Bread Knife
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Old 12-29-2016, 05:51 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunky View Post
You better get a tetanus shot before using that knife


I'm not a photographer and I don't play one on TV.

I can only say that my friend here has sliced bread for longer then I have been alive and to my knowledge no one has ever been sickened by any bread sliced by it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
Zagut; what about cleaning caring for beloved friend? That is the type of tiny teeth that cant be sharpened, if they ever got dull.

But yes, that is a rusty knife and doesnt looks safe to use.
So far CakePoet care and feeding of said knife has been washing with soap and water after use and making sure it's dry before putting away.

As I said I'm no photographer so the pic might not be the best. But I can assure you there is no rust on this knife. Any rust color is due to my lack of photography skills and the patina it's acquired.
There is some pitting on the blade and yes it's not shiny but I dare any one of you to be as old as this friend, sit in the kitchen 24/7/365 and still be shiny and new.



As far as sharpening goes. That was kinda/sorta my point in posting my friend.

It's been in service longer then I've been alive (And I'll bet longer then any poster here at DC.) and hasn't needed to be sharpened. Yet it can still cut paper thin slices of bread.

I've never been able to find out what the edge is called, who made it, or if anyone still makes this edge. But if I can last as long as it can I'll be a happy person.
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Old 12-30-2016, 01:45 AM   #31
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Oil your knife, it does help too. It was called a serrated blade, sometimes called finely serrated.
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Old 12-30-2016, 01:19 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
And I can only add the one that works for you.




I can give you a specific knife but no brand or type of edge.

To me this is the best bread knife ever.

Attachment 25924

Attachment 25925

It's ancient but it works like a charm and can slice bread paper thin if that's what you desire.

Been in the family for longer then I know but I'd be heartbroken if I ever had to live without it.
That's more like a weird double cut saw blade. I can't believe that it actually cuts like a normal serrated bread knife - it has to work more like a saw cutting wood.

Unlike the video, my bread knife is only used for bread, never for tomatoes or other veggies. My other knives are kept sharp, so even cutting a ripe tomato paper thin is no problem.
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Old 12-31-2016, 05:36 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
Oil your knife, it does help too. It was called a serrated blade, sometimes called finely serrated.
CakePoet, I'm well versed on keeping rust away from steel/iron.
Oil is a good thing and I believe that's a part of it's history that causes some to think it's nasty and will kill any who encounter it.

Please explain the difference between "Finely Serrated" and "Serrated" to a dumbass like me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
That's more like a weird double cut saw blade. I can't believe that it actually cuts like a normal serrated bread knife - it has to work more like a saw cutting wood.
You are correct RP. It does act like a saw blade but it really can cut bread paper thin after all these years.

Can you give me a definition of a "normal" serrated bread knife?

I don't know if this knife was originally intended as a bread knife but it's worked for one for the last at least 70+ years I've known to slice bread.

This thing could have had medical uses as it's development and evolved to the kitchen.

My Great Grandfather was a doctor in the Civil War and it could have been something he used in his practice.





Now to really drift this thread off topic....

I have my Great Grandfathers ledgers from the 1870's.

To visit and medicate a patient was around 25 to 50 cents.
(We're talking on horseback and God knows what voodoo involved.)

And he was paid with all manner of things from boots to cigars to mention a few.

The big ticket item was to deliver a baby.

Anyone want to venture a guess as to how much that cost?
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Old 12-31-2016, 11:40 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Zagut View Post


You are correct RP. It does act like a saw blade but it really can cut bread paper thin after all these years.

Can you give me a definition of a "normal" serrated bread knife?

I don't know if this knife was originally intended as a bread knife but it's worked for one for the last at least 70+ years I've known to slice bread.

This thing could have had medical uses as it's development and evolved to the kitchen.

My Great Grandfather was a doctor in the Civil War and it could have been something he used in his practice.
With those fine teeth, that could have been used for minor amputations. That was the most common form of military surgery during the Civil War. Hard to think of something that could have been employed in that manner being used to slice bread.
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Old 01-01-2017, 12:05 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
CakePoet, I'm well versed on keeping rust away from steel/iron.
Oil is a good thing and I believe that's a part of it's history that causes some to think it's nasty and will kill any who encounter it.

Please explain the difference between "Finely Serrated" and "Serrated" to a dumbass like me.



You are correct RP. It does act like a saw blade but it really can cut bread paper thin after all these years.

Can you give me a definition of a "normal" serrated bread knife?

I don't know if this knife was originally intended as a bread knife but it's worked for one for the last at least 70+ years I've known to slice bread.

This thing could have had medical uses as it's development and evolved to the kitchen.

My Great Grandfather was a doctor in the Civil War and it could have been something he used in his practice.





Now to really drift this thread off topic....

I have my Great Grandfathers ledgers from the 1870's.

To visit and medicate a patient was around 25 to 50 cents.
(We're talking on horseback and God knows what voodoo involved.)

And he was paid with all manner of things from boots to cigars to mention a few.

The big ticket item was to deliver a baby.

Anyone want to venture a guess as to how much that cost?
I would have to guess that the baby cost at least a chicken.
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Old 01-01-2017, 12:06 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
With those fine teeth, that could have been used for minor amputations. That was the most common form of military surgery during the Civil War. Hard to think of something that could have been employed in that manner being used to slice bread.
And now instead of taking life, that knife is giving life. Can't ask anymore than that of it.
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Old 01-01-2017, 02:24 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zagut View Post
CakePoet, I'm well versed on keeping rust away from steel/iron.
Oil is a good thing and I believe that's a part of it's history that causes some to think it's nasty and will kill any who encounter it.

Please explain the difference between "Finely Serrated" and "Serrated" to a dumbass like me.



You are correct RP. It does act like a saw blade but it really can cut bread paper thin after all these years.

Can you give me a definition of a "normal" serrated bread knife?

I don't know if this knife was originally intended as a bread knife but it's worked for one for the last at least 70+ years I've known to slice bread.

This thing could have had medical uses as it's development and evolved to the kitchen.

My Great Grandfather was a doctor in the Civil War and it could have been something he used in his practice.





Now to really drift this thread off topic....

I have my Great Grandfathers ledgers from the 1870's.

To visit and medicate a patient was around 25 to 50 cents.
(We're talking on horseback and God knows what voodoo involved.)

And he was paid with all manner of things from boots to cigars to mention a few.

The big ticket item was to deliver a baby.

Anyone want to venture a guess as to how much that cost?
An arm and a leg?
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Old 01-01-2017, 03:22 PM   #38
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Finely serrated or micro serrations" is a knife with lots lofts of sharp teeth on the blade. Every "wave" in the knife is made up of more sharp teeth. This seldom goes dull but cant be sharpened.
http://kitchenfantasy.com/neverneed.jpg

Serrated knife blade, is a blade, think of a edge like a wave, it doesnt have lots of teeth, just one edge that is "wavy" and this can be sharpened.
Like this:
http://kitchenfantasy.com/goodserrated.jpg


I just had my bread knife sharpened, forgot and now I need to get a new cutting board.
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:27 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
With those fine teeth, that could have been used for minor amputations. That was the most common form of military surgery during the Civil War. Hard to think of something that could have been employed in that manner being used to slice bread.
The use of it being used in surgery is speculation.
But it' been used to slice bread as long as I've been alive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I would have to guess that the baby cost at least a chicken.
It cost more then 1 chicken Addie.
I'd have to dig out the ledgers and see how much a chicken was worth but I'm sure it was less the he charged.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
And now instead of taking life, that knife is giving life. Can't ask anymore than that of it.
As stated above it's being used in surgery is speculation but if it was it wouldn't have been used to take life but to save it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
An arm and a leg?

Could be if it was used to amputate.
I think he had larger implements to do that.



For those who want to know.
It cost $5.00 to have him deliver a baby.
He added 50 cents if he had to use a device. (I think it might have been Ice Tongs.)
I'll leave it up to those interested to convert that to todays dollars.
But one reason I believe it cost so much more then the usual 10 cents to 75 cents is the time involved for the little rascal to make him/her self known.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CakePoet View Post
Finely serrated or micro serrations" is a knife with lots lofts of sharp teeth on the blade. Every "wave" in the knife is made up of more sharp teeth. This seldom goes dull but cant be sharpened.
http://kitchenfantasy.com/neverneed.jpg

Serrated knife blade, is a blade, think of a edge like a wave, it doesnt have lots of teeth, just one edge that is "wavy" and this can be sharpened.
Like this:
http://kitchenfantasy.com/goodserrated.jpg


I just had my bread knife sharpened, forgot and now I need to get a new cutting board.
Thank you for the links Cake Poet. Now I've got some reading to do.

And do you really need a new cutting board or can you refurbish the old one?
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:30 PM   #40
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It is cheap thin plastic one and well the cutting board split. OOps.
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