"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Cookware and Accessories > Knives
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-09-2008, 06:02 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 49
Wusthof vs Henckels

Which do you prefer and why?

They seem an obvious competition to each other, and im half tempted to buy some at some point.... I love japanese knives, though i feel for day to day use in the kitchens, and sharpening perhaps one of these would suit me better and be easier to use/maintain.

Im stuck between the two, so i need some help!

__________________

__________________
chef_william is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 06:24 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,390
I think comparable grades of either brand are pretty much equal. I have Henckels Professional S knives and really like them. I have not used Japanese knives so cannot compare them. The Henckels are a much better knife than the Chicago Cutlery set I had before.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 06:45 PM   #3
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
I know Wusthof blades are forged, but I was pretty sure that most Henckels knives were stamped.
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2008, 06:53 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Bloomington, IN
Posts: 1,129
Send a message via AIM to college_cook
OK- a little clarification here: Henckels is actually one of two business divisions of the company. The brand generally known as Henckels is the value brand, which produces stamped knives. The brand generally known as Zwilling or Zwilling JA Henckels, produces their premium forged knives, probably more on par with your typical Wusthof knife. I do know that the value brand of Henckels won't hold a candle to Wusthof knives, simply because they are stamped while Wusthof is forged. However, I think as far as stamped knives go, Henckels is among the best if not the best stamped knife you can buy.
__________________
college_cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2008, 01:00 AM   #5
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Quote:
Originally Posted by college_cook View Post
OK- a little clarification here: Henckels is actually one of two business divisions of the company. The brand generally known as Henckels is the value brand, which produces stamped knives. The brand generally known as Zwilling or Zwilling JA Henckels, produces their premium forged knives, probably more on par with your typical Wusthof knife. I do know that the value brand of Henckels won't hold a candle to Wusthof knives, simply because they are stamped while Wusthof is forged. However, I think as far as stamped knives go, Henckels is among the best if not the best stamped knife you can buy.

The premium lines of both company are forged; I think they're pretty comparable. I guess if I had to choose, the Wusthof CIA knives are probably my favorites. But I would almost always choose a Japanese brand over either.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2008, 08:11 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 49
Rob, would you agree that euro knives, such as the wusthofs are noticably easier to maintain, in particular sharpen (hone) on a steel?

I have found japanese knives comparably more effort to keep sharp, responding well to a diamond steel or stone, but nowhere near as easy to get a 'decent' edge by simply honing as i have seen a euro knife do.

Obviously i understand japanese knives are the best and will get a superior edge with a bit of effort and skill, but i need something that will handle a hard work out 4 days a week at work, that will be easy to hone to a decent edge without too much effort..... From what im thinking, a wusthof would probably suit quite well?
__________________
chef_william is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2008, 11:14 PM   #7
Sous Chef
 
buzzard767's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Naples, FL & Wausau, WI
Posts: 608
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef_william View Post
Rob, would you agree that euro knives, such as the wusthofs are noticably easier to maintain, in particular sharpen (hone) on a steel?

I have found japanese knives comparably more effort to keep sharp, responding well to a diamond steel or stone, but nowhere near as easy to get a 'decent' edge by simply honing as i have seen a euro knife do.

Obviously i understand japanese knives are the best and will get a superior edge with a bit of effort and skill, but i need something that will handle a hard work out 4 days a week at work, that will be easy to hone to a decent edge without too much effort..... From what im thinking, a wusthof would probably suit quite well?
Tough call. The Germans are easier to sharpen because the steel is much less hard than their Japanese counterparts. The other side of the coin is that the Japanese edges last longer than the Germans.

A sharp German knife (by comparison) goes through celery like a hot knife through butter where a sharp Japanese knife goes through the same like a knife through air. First of all they (J) can take and hold a shaper edge and more importantly they are much thinner thus much less friction.

Do you need that? Probably not. I do but I am spoiled.

Buzz
__________________
buzzard767 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2008, 12:26 AM   #8
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Not only are Japanese knives generally much harder, they're usually much thinner. They'll continue to outperform thicker Euro-style knives even when they're starting to dull.
__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 08:06 PM   #9
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzard767 View Post
Tough call. The Germans are easier to sharpen because the steel is much less hard than their Japanese counterparts. The other side of the coin is that the Japanese edges last longer than the Germans.

A sharp German knife (by comparison) goes through celery like a hot knife through butter where a sharp Japanese knife goes through the same like a knife through air. First of all they (J) can take and hold a shaper edge and more importantly they are much thinner thus much less friction.

Do you need that? Probably not. I do but I am spoiled.

Buzz
I feel the sturdyness of a euro knife would suit me best - 15 hour shifts in the kitchen takes its toll, so i think i need something 'easier' to maintain for optimum day to day use... Id love the very best jap knives, much like yourself, though i feel i couldnt look after them as well as i should given the amount of use they'd get... based on that and what you've said i think ill have a pop on the euro side (probably wusthof) and see how i get on.

Thanks for the input
__________________
chef_william is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2008, 11:18 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
Rob Babcock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 1,281
Yeah, Euro knives still have plenty of utility in the pro's kitchen. On Mutha's Day I opted to keep my Wusthof on the line instead of my Kanetsune; I figured things would be crazy and I wouldn't have time to keep an eye on it.
__________________

__________________
If we're not supposed to eat animals, then how come they're made out of meat?
Rob Babcock is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.