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Old 08-06-2017, 10:38 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I don't think I've seen LP grills at any home improvement store. I think they are all propane, which can't use LP without being converted.
LP is Liquid Propane. They may need conversion to run on natural gas, but every one I ever saw comes designed for propane.

I know that natural gas kitchen ranges need to have a conversion kit installed to use them with LP (both gas ranges I've bought came with the kit, ready for installation if needed), but I've never used a gas grill with natural gas, so I don't really know what the requirement is for that.
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:39 PM   #22
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I don't think I've seen LP grills at any home improvement store. I think they are all propane, which can't use LP without being converted.
Propane was discovered by the French chemist Marcellin Berthelot in 1857

Propane is one of a group of liquefied petroleum gases (LP gases). The others include butane, propylene, butadiene, butylene, isobutylene, and mixtures thereof.

LPG is a mixture of gasses and referred to simply as propane or butane

LPGLiquefied Petroleum Gas – is flammable hydrocarbon gas liquefied through pressurisation. Propane is classified as LPG, along with butane, isobutane and mixtures of these gases.

There are some differences between Propane and LPG within related industries depending on whether referred to and used as a gas or liquid.

Propane is a byproduct of natural gas processing and petroleum refining. Before propane is used, it exists in one of two forms, liquid or gas (or vapor). Both liquid propane and gas are usable but cannot be used interchangeably. In other words, a propane system designed to use gas can’t utilize propane in its liquid form and vice-versa. Additionally, the characteristics of propane liquid and propane gas are so different that the primary properties we are concerned with are as different as night and day. With propane liquid, temperature is the primary factor whereas weight is the main concern regarding propane vapor. Think of it this way, water is liquid and steam is water vapor. The same holds true for propane and is explained in detail below.

Propane Liquid
Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), is a fuel in liquid form at or below its boiling point (-44 degrees F) and when it is stored under pressure, otherwise it turns to gas (or vapor). A propane and butane mixture has been successfully used for over 95 years in more than 270,000 American vehicles and over 13 million worldwide used mainly as a vehicle fuel or to easily identify a leak (due to the smell).


Propane Gas (or Vapor)
Propane becomes a vapor at temperatures above -44 degrees F. Similar to water when it boils and gives off steam, propane gives off vapor when it boils. Propane gas is heavier than air and will settle in the lowest place possible. If there is a leak, the level will continue to rise and may ignite if it finds a source. It is mainly used for engines, barbeques, portable stoves and home heating.
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Old 08-06-2017, 12:43 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
LP is Liquid Propane. They may need conversion to run on natural gas, but every one I ever saw comes designed for propane.

I know that natural gas kitchen ranges need to have a conversion kit installed to use them with LP (both gas ranges I've bought came with the kit, ready for installation if needed), but I've never used a gas grill with natural gas, so I don't really know what the requirement is for that.
Duh, propane in its gaseous form but not LP, its liquid form. The two are not interchangeable.

What Is the Difference Between LP and Propane Gas? - AMERIgreen Energy
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Old 08-06-2017, 01:15 PM   #24
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GF sprays me with soapy water every so often because she suspects I'm leaking gas...
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:27 PM   #25
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Here's a link to some more interesting facts about propane and LPG.

Is There a Difference Between Propane vs LPG?

Propane vs LPG | What’s what? Same or Different? | ELGAS - LPG Gas for Home & Business

I also found this paragraph from a website about the difference of

Vapor Service vs. Liquid Service

Propane vapor service and propane liquid service are completely different from one another. Most all propane applications use vapor for service requirements. The importance in knowing the difference between liquid service and vapor service is strictly for safety and usability. Appliances such as water heaters, furnaces and gas grills are used in vapor service. If these appliances were to have liquid propane flow to their burners, the result could possibly be a fire or similar danger. This is why propane cylinders should be positioned upright when grilling. Turning a cylinder on its side or inverting it while being used on a gas grill or fryer is not a smart thing to do.
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Old 08-07-2017, 11:03 AM   #26
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All of this talk about liquid vs. gas is mostly irrelevant. For virtually all of the uses that we as consumers put it to, we are storing propane or LPG as a liquid, but using it as gas. I thought that the discussion was about the conversion necessary to run on natural gas vs. LPG, both of which are in gaseous form when burned in a kitchen range.

Appliances which are able use either still require the feed system which is appropriate to the particular fuel. This usually is a simple kit, mostly just replacing the burner orifices and changing a part in the regulator.
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Old 08-07-2017, 12:06 PM   #27
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I think the post was originally about testing for gas leaks.

Soapy water is the most common and good for testing for leaks in different areas of a gas line and system.

There are solutions available that are used same as soapy water.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/BrassCraf...FUisZAodvB8BzQ

Another method often used to test for leaks on gas appliances and systems found in homes, RVs, boats, etc. is to use a manometer. These can be purchased or you can make one your self out of some tubing.

A few results searching "manometer homemade"



Using a Homemade Manometer

How to make a water manometer

RV U Tube Manometer

There are also inexpensive dial type manometer usually made and from China on eBay. With the correct fittings can be connected directly to a gas grill.

This is how many people test for leaks is to connect a manometer directly to the stove which is part of a gas system in their home, rv, boat, etc.

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Old 08-07-2017, 12:46 PM   #28
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Wouldn't the liquid at the bottom of the tank be liquid propane and the gas above it in the same container be propane gas?

At least I would have bet on it until I read this thread. Are they not exactly the same gas?
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