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Old 03-23-2007, 07:18 PM   #11
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Good save.

It would be an interesting fact, to discover how much power one saves by using the frozen earth instead of powering a freezer through the winter.

I'm such a revivalist.
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Old 03-28-2007, 02:30 PM   #12
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Check your local library for the FoxFire books ... I know one of them has a section about using a pit as a makeshift root cellar. Another good resource would be Mother Earth News.

Oh, to answer your question about kim chee, it is a fermented Korean pickled cabbage. In rural areas it was often burried in the ground for storage.
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Old 03-28-2007, 02:40 PM   #13
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I have the most fantastic book on this sort of thing, writen by a guy (died a few years ago) that ran several small holdings, it called Self Sufficiency, and it goes into detail about how to build these clamps, and where and what materials :)

next time I`m at my gardens, I`ll get the book out my shed and give you more details about it, it`s a Fantastic read in it`s own right, and covers Everything! :)
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Old 03-28-2007, 02:50 PM   #14
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i guess it depends on your clime, and what you're trying to preserve.

it wouldn't work in the tropics without a ton of salt or acid, and conversely, you'd have to go below the frost line in colder places or risk everything freezing solid. if you dig that deep, you might as well dig a cellar.

years ago, many appalachian trail thru hikers buried large, well sealed cans of foodstuffs at easily accesible points on the trail before they began their journey.
it made restocking much easier, so the hikers could carry fewer days rations, and often saved a few extra miles into a town to reach a post office.

much of it was dried or canned foods, (and other small items like string, tape, batteries, moleskin, etc.), but it's still the same principal. bury the food to store and protect it, as well as stabilize the temp.
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Old 03-28-2007, 05:24 PM   #15
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YT, is this the book?

Amazon.co.uk: New Complete Self-sufficiency: The Classic Guide for Realists and Dreamers: Books: John Seymour,Will Sutherland,E.F. Schumacher

I've been thinking about getting it.
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Old 03-29-2007, 05:37 AM   #16
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the one I have is by the same author co-authored with his wife Sally Seymour.
but yeah, it`s the same fella and same subject matter :)
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Old 04-04-2007, 10:09 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom
i guess it depends on your clime, and what you're trying to preserve.

it wouldn't work in the tropics without a ton of salt or acid, and conversely, you'd have to go below the frost line in colder places or risk everything freezing solid. if you dig that deep, you might as well dig a cellar.

years ago, many appalachian trail thru hikers buried large, well sealed cans of foodstuffs at easily accesible points on the trail before they began their journey.
it made restocking much easier, so the hikers could carry fewer days rations, and often saved a few extra miles into a town to reach a post office.

much of it was dried or canned foods, (and other small items like string, tape, batteries, moleskin, etc.), but it's still the same principal. bury the food to store and protect it, as well as stabilize the temp.
Morbid thread?! I have heard of of various ways of preserving food before but never burying. My granma had no fridge and she lived in very warm weather, she used the sun to dry meat and then hang it over the cooking place, so it got smoked and it lasted a long time.Has anyone actually tried this?
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Old 04-08-2007, 11:32 AM   #18
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I have a book called Stocking Up, by the Editors of Organic Gardening. It describes how and what you can store underground. They recommend burying the food between thick layers of straw to make digging easier.

I would imagine that field mice could be quite a problem. I don't know if they would eat potatoes, carrots and such, but they nest underground, so be ready for a surprise when you dig up your vegetables!

The book also tells how to dry foods, Jikoni. DH has made dried, smoked venison jerky. The method is probably similar to the one your mother used.
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Old 04-08-2007, 12:42 PM   #19
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I do seem to recall reading a homesteading/preserving/gardening book where - in order to prevent the rodent predation thing - you buried metal garbage cans that had drainage holed punched in them, & layered root vegetables in those, using sand & straw between the layers.
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