"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-18-2005, 08:29 PM   #11
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
GB, check that link I posted. They recommend you NOT try to can meat sauce. It is just too easy to go icky. It is a better idea to can the tomato base and then just go from there. The acid ratios need to be balanced in that sort of thing which is why canning salsa can sometimes be tricky. Happy canning!
__________________

__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2005, 07:41 AM   #12
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Oh no, that is a big bummer!!! I was hoping to try to start selling one of my meat sauces. I was going to can it and bring it around to small stores. How do the meat sauce companies do it?
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2005, 07:57 AM   #13
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
GB, I believe they use very high temp processes to make sure it's safe.

You might be able to accomplish the same at home with a pressure cooker/canner. You still have to make sure the acids are right though...

YOur local SBA or health department could probably point you towards more info on what would be required if you were looking to sell your sauces to stores.

John
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2005, 09:35 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
marmalady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: USA,SouthCarolina
Posts: 2,642
GB, you definitely need a pressure canner for a meat sauce - particularly if you're going to sell it! i bought a pressure canner a few years ago for about $100, so they're not prohibitive; it's a small one, tho; I think it does about 6 quart jars at a time.


Also, be sure to check your town's laws re home food production; some are very lax, and others won't let you anything from your 'home' kitchen; has to be a separate layout, with sinks, refrigeration, etc.
__________________
marmalady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2005, 11:18 PM   #15
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by GB
Michael (or anyone else) I am new to canning (haven't actually started yet) and have always heard to get the Ball Blue book. Is the Ball Blue book of Preserving the one I want for canning or is preserving and canning different animals? What I really want to learn how to do is can a meat sauce I make (if that is even possible).
Yeah, it's the Ball Blue Book of Preserving ... I just never paid attention to the full title. It's just a very good, inexpensive depending on where you get it, basic book on canning. I guess calling it the book of canning and preserving would be redundant since you are preserving by canning ... there are no recipes for salt cure, cold smoke or drying preservation.

High acid foods canned in 1/2 - 1 pint sizes can be processed in a water bath (things like jams and preserves, etc.). But, when you go to larger things like quarts or a meat sauce you HAVE to use a pressure canner. That's why if someone has never canned before I always recommend they get the Ball book as a starting reference.

If you shop around you should be able to find a new Presto 22-23 qt pressure canner/cooker for about $90-$100.

Sometimes you can find one in good shape at a garage sale. In that case - before you use it ... if it has a pressure guage on the top it needs to be checked to make sure the guage is accurate. Our county aggriculture extension office does it for free down here - we just have to call and make arrangements. It will probably also need a new gasket and overpressure plug - ACE Hardware carries those in a set for
about $10-$15.


Quote:
Originally Posted by IcyMist
How long is it safe to keep something that is canned? Should you put a label on the jar where you know how long to keep?
I think the general rule is one year - as long as the seal is intact and there are no bubbles or funny things growing it the jar. If you pull out a jar that has bubbling, foaming, or mold growing on it DO NOT EVEN OPEN IT - DISCARD IMMEDIATELY! High acid foods that can be canned in a water bath are probably safe for up to a couple of years. Low acid foods canned in a pressure canner, where they are blanched and then canned like green beans, corn, etc. - should be boiled for at least 3 minutes before tasting or eating. I think the same goes for canned meats. This stuff is all in the Ball Blue Book.

To be honest - I've never had anything that didn't get consumed within a year or less.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2005, 07:43 AM   #16
Head Chef
 
ronjohn55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 2,080
Excellent points Michael!

We always follow a pretty simple rule with anything that we have canned - If you open it up and it doesn't look/smell/ or just plain seem quite right - just pitch it. Why take the chance?

John

(I must confess, much to my wife's dismay, our pressure canner gets used more for making yeast feeders -unfermented, unhopped beeer - then it does for canning our preserving foods)
__________________
ronjohn55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-2005, 03:12 PM   #17
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Thanks everyone!!!
__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2005, 11:28 AM   #18
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Well GB - I finally found my canning books ... and pressure canning time for meat sauces (something like a sauce for spaghetti, lasagna, etc.?) is about 1 hour and 15 minutes.

RonJohn brought up a good point ... before you set up shop and start production you need to check the laws in your city/state. Some places have prohabitions against using a home kitchen - you have to use a kitchen certified by the health department, etc. - but depending on the product there is sometimes some allowances made. And then there are those pesky USDA requirements for ingredients, nutritional info, and UPC bar codes, etc. There is a book that covers everything you need to know to start your own food business ... http://www.jazzfoods.com It's about $100 - but if you're serious about it then it would probably be well worth the money. I don't have a copy yet - but it's near the top of my list.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-2005, 12:39 PM   #19
Chief Eating Officer
 
GB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: USA,Massachusetts
Posts: 25,509
Thanks Michael. I will put that book on my wish list. First I will talk to my friend with the board of health and pick his brain.

also, thanks for that link Michael. I used it and bought the Blue book. It is going to take a while to get it (possible 6 to 8 weeks, but I am guessing it won't really take that long), but it was by far the best price around. My local book store wanted $9 for it and they didn't even have it in stock.
__________________

__________________
You know you can't resist clicking
this link. Your eyes will thank you. VISUAL BLISS
GB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.