"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2006, 01:49 PM   #11
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
http://www.canningpantry.com/usbowaca.html
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 03:58 PM   #12
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Illinois/USA
Posts: 1,343
As for the gift giving idea, I would not give prepared sauces to anyone. It is customary here to make up the dry spices in a bag, print the recipe and attach it to the bag. Buy a small bottle of whiskey and put it in a cooking mitt. Ribbon the spices to the mitt on the outside.
As you can imagine from using a store shelf sauce, something made fresh makes a difference.
I often receive hot cocoa mix in a minature dairy milk can canister or some other little novelty container. This year, I'll fill it and pass it on to someone else. We do the same with dry soup and mugs.
__________________

__________________
StirBlue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 05:55 PM   #13
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
In our city among friends we give food gifts all the time. The time I gave a "mix" was for a Bisquick knockoff--or a 15 bean soup. Just a difference of custom.
I have often done smoked chickens or Carolina pulled pork as Christmas gifts and if I didn't give my sauce with these, the folks would call me up. I have added bourbon to my sauce recipe also to approximate Jack's.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2006, 08:12 PM   #14
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 3
I actually have a similar question... I have a bbq recipe as follows:

BBQ Dry Rub
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup sweet paprika
3 tablespoons black pepper
3 tablespoons coarse salt
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons celery seeds
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Combine all ingredients and mix.

BBQ Sauce
2 cups ketchup
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 tablespoons molasses
2 tablespoons spicy mustard
1 tablespoon Tabasco sauce
1 tablesoon BBQ Dry Rub
2 teaspoons liquid smoke
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1 tablespoon Heinz 57
1 tablespoon A-1

Combine all ingredients and bring slowly to a boil over medium-high heat.
Reduce heat to medium and simmer the sauce for 10-15 minutes.
Makes 2 1/2 cups.

I want to make this, and give away maybe 1/2 pint jars of it for Christmas along with a little bag of the dry rub. I've been looking into canning because I'd like to give it to them unrefrigerated. I'm trying to keep cost to a minimum so I'd really prefer not to invest in seperate equipment. I'm thinking this is probably going to fall in the high acidity category so I'm hoping the boiling method is adequete. I'd like just to do this in a regular stock pot if possible. But I'm not sure how much boiling time to use and if this is even possible.

Can someone help?
__________________
jcaudill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 03:23 AM   #15
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 42
Okay, here's the issue. SOP in home canning is that one only works from procedures that have been vetted by a certified food scientist. Certifying a procedure involves more than just eyeballing the recipe and estimating acidity. In the test kitchen, they prepare the formula and test the pH. Here, we're winging it and that's generally discouraged.

For example, Gretchen notes that these are tomato-based sauces, so they start out acidic.* Well, yes and no. Commercial ketchup is made from tomato paste, and that's considerably less acidic than whole tomatoes. (The first step in making commercial tomato paste is centrifuging, which removes a lot of water and, with it, a lot of acidity.) Now, it's true that ketchup also has vinegar, so that takes up the acidity, but is it enough? When I made my first post, I was skeptical, in part because it is labeled "refrigerate after opening." Indeed, I have known ketchup to ferment occasionally when left at room temperature. Digging around, I finally found a USDA chart which lists the acidity of ketchup at 3.89 - 3.92, i.e., not quite acidic enough for hot water bath treatment. But, all three BBQ sauce recipes posted so far add even more vinegar. So maybe that's enough. I'd even say probably. I hesitate, though, to say it's beyond question. Which throws me back on that rule that one should only use certified procedures.

* Gretchen also mentions the sugar, and suggests that might have a further preservative effect here. I respectfully disagree. Sugar as such doesn't inhibit bacteria in the way that, say, salt and acidity do. Sugar can only inhibit bacteria if there's enough of it that binds so much water that the bacteria can't find enough to reproduce. Think jam. There's not nearly enough sugar in these recipes, even including that in the ketchup, to get this effect. So, I'm going to concentrate on acidity.

Then, there's another thing. I feel that, when giving folks a present of home canned product, one should be particularly conservative. Plainly, the risk (if any) of hot water processing these sauces would be very, very low. Most people, though, have zero risk tolerance for these things. By way of comparison, I happily use raw and undercooked eggs myself, but when I serve guests a caesar salad, I use a cooked-egg dressing. I consider it respecting that not everyone has my risk tolerance. So, here, I would pressure can.

A final point. Gretchen said pressure canning would be overkill. Maybe. But, it won't hurt the sauce. I've pressure canned a barbecue-style braising sauce that was definitely low acid. It came out just fine. Not surprising, really, given that (like the sauces we're discussing here) it was a puree of fairly sturdy ingredients. And, after all, commercial barbecue sauces are pressure-canned and they come out fine from a texture point of view. (My complaint with them is that they're too salty and too sweet.)

Please let me be clear. I'm not saying using a hot water bath would be reckless. I'm not even saying it would be wrong. I'm saying it's not what I would do and explaining why. I'll agree it's a subject over which reasonable minds could differ. I would recommend, though, that if you decide to pursue hot water bath processing, you at least contact your local extension office and ask their opinion. If they give it an upcheck, that would be good enough for me.
__________________
PBear42 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 06:37 AM   #16
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
I'm thinking this is probably going to fall in the high acidity category so I'm hoping the boiling method is adequete. I'd like just to do this in a regular stock pot if possible. But I'm not sure how much boiling time to use and if this is even possible.

Can someone help?


I think for a gift of this you have two possibilities. I have done both. One is to give the sauce as you want and tell your recipient (ON THE LABEL) to refrigerate it. It 's a small jar. It shouldn't be a burden. And they will undoubtedly be excited to use it quickly.
Otherwise, you can can it in a water bath for 20 minutes. Using a stock pot is possible. Personally, I would give it to be refrigerated.
Since my degrees are in microbiology I do approach food preservation with some caution and knowledge also.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 08:20 AM   #17
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gretchen
I think for a gift of this you have two possibilities. I have done both. One is to give the sauce as you want and tell your recipient (ON THE LABEL) to refrigerate it. It 's a small jar. It shouldn't be a burden. And they will undoubtedly be excited to use it quickly.
Otherwise, you can can it in a water bath for 20 minutes. Using a stock pot is possible. Personally, I would give it to be refrigerated.
Since my degrees are in microbiology I do approach food preservation with some caution and knowledge also.
This is very helpful thanks! For clarification: are you saying I can make it, put it in jars, give it away unrefrigerated and then tell them to refrigerate? If so, how long could it be unrefrigerated?

Thanks again so much for this reply!
__________________
jcaudill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 09:00 AM   #18
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
If you are mailing it, your recipe might not work. Mine or one with more vinegar would. Yours can be left unrefrigerated for hours easily--think ketchup at a picnic all day.
__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 09:06 AM   #19
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 3
It's not being mailed... it would be made and given out on Christmas eve. So, I'd like to be making it like the 22nd or 23rd.. or maybe even earlier. That is why I was looking at the canning option.
__________________
jcaudill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 10:00 AM   #20
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,694
Make it when you want to. Put it in the fridge. Give it out with a label that says Refrigerate.
__________________

__________________
Gretchen is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.