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Old 11-30-2012, 09:13 AM   #11
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Why even risk killing yourself by canning when you can toss it in the freezer? Or buy more at the store?
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Old 11-30-2012, 12:39 PM   #12
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Why even risk killing yourself by canning when you can toss it in the freezer? Or buy more at the store?
Well first of all it was a curiosity to me.

Also, if it was something that was truly safe to do I would do it.

As I mentioned earlier I lost everything in my freezer and my fridge during a 10 day power outage due to a bad storm a few years ago.

Everything was warm .. it all had to go.

I thought that if this was a safe thing to do it would be a good idea.

Plus my stores run some unreal sales on butter and it would be at that time I would have done this.

Also some people don't have freezers or freezer space to take advantage of sales and keep it on hand.

Limited incomes prohibit just running to the store anytime you want something.

My curiousity was peaked by what I saw and fueled by the aformentioned things.

However .. as per my last post .. I won't be doing it based on all the great information that has been shared here.
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Old 11-30-2012, 02:30 PM   #13
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You might want to study the issue of botulism poisoning a little more. Butter can be and has been stored quite well without refrigeration. There is no danger of botulism toxin in that. Once a food is placed in a 'vacuum', however, the rules change.
So, you're saying that the interior of a mass of butter in, say, a covered bowl does not maintain the necessary anaerobic environment to germinate the spores? The air penetrates to the interior? If that's true, then rillettes with a fat seal on top are not the anaerobic environment it was imagined.

I don't buy that. I think instead that it is simply that butter is an extremely unlikely field for culturing the spores. I would be pleased to hear of a botulism case tied to any caned fat, that is fat without some produce added, which of course does indeed create a potential problem.

I doubt very much that merely preparing and fat-sealing rillettes in jars renders them safe, while creating a partial vacuum makes them dangerous. Rather, it appears that, like butter, a simply meat product is just not a good place to bloom the spores.
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Old 11-30-2012, 05:04 PM   #14
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Yes, but you are not required to believe it, though I continue to suggest you study the issue further.
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Old 11-30-2012, 07:22 PM   #15
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So, you're saying that the interior of a mass of butter in, say, a covered bowl does not maintain the necessary anaerobic environment to germinate the spores? The air penetrates to the interior? If that's true, then rillettes with a fat seal on top are not the anaerobic environment it was imagined.

I don't buy that. I think instead that it is simply that butter is an extremely unlikely field for culturing the spores. I would be pleased to hear of a botulism case tied to any caned fat, that is fat without some produce added, which of course does indeed create a potential problem.

I doubt very much that merely preparing and fat-sealing rillettes in jars renders them safe, while creating a partial vacuum makes them dangerous. Rather, it appears that, like butter, a simply meat product is just not a good place to bloom the spores.
Although I can't speak to canned fat alone, there are plenty if botulism examples of canned fatty meats.
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Old 12-18-2012, 02:17 AM   #16
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You can buy canned butter (eg. Red Feather) so I know it's possible! Canning at home may require pressure canning. Now before anyone gets their feathers ruffled, I'm not saying it's a good idea! Just saying if you can buy it in a can it could probably be canned at home somehow.
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Old 12-18-2012, 05:42 AM   #17
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I have heard of this before. You certainly got a good debate going. That's why this forum is called "Discusd Cooking."
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Old 12-18-2012, 09:05 AM   #18
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Commercial processes can't always be duplicated safely at home, e.g., infused oils.
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Old 12-18-2012, 09:19 AM   #19
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You can buy canned butter (eg. Red Feather) so I know it's possible! Canning at home may require pressure canning. Now before anyone gets their feathers ruffled, I'm not saying it's a good idea! Just saying if you can buy it in a can it could probably be canned at home somehow.
Never heard of this before .. kind of spendy but super long shelf life ... good for the preppers out there !!
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Old 12-19-2012, 11:54 PM   #20
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Not every commercial process can be duplicated at home, but most of them can. Virtually all of them can if you're willing to spend some money and really know what you're doing.
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