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Old 10-18-2010, 11:27 PM   #11
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I would be willing to bet that the change in color of the garlic was due to sulfer in the water that you used. Now please be aware that this is only a guess. Did you by any chance use well water? Sometimes that can have a high level of sulfer. Again, this is only a guess.
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Old 10-19-2010, 11:35 AM   #12
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Oops, what was I thinking. Garlic changes color at will in pickling. I've seen it many times in different applications too. The reaction is pretty much unpredictable. No problem at all, yuor pickles are fine and so is your garlic.
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Old 10-19-2010, 08:38 PM   #13
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My lacto fermentation process

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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Got any good recipes for the lacto fermentation technique?
I use a very simple process - for cukes, I make a med brine (2-3 Tbs kosher salt in a quart of water), use clean quart jars, add pickling spices/garlic/dill, etc. (a grape leaf or two will make pickles crisper), fill jar with brine, use something to hold the cukes under the surface of the brine (important!), cover loosely with the canning lid - half sours take 2-3 days, full sours take 4-5 days or longer.

The brine will always be cloudy, and may have bubbles, foam, and maybe even a little white mold - no problem, just skim it off and recap. But if you can't/don't keep the pickles under the brine, you will have more mold, and the pickles may soften.

Once the pickles are done to your satisfaction, you can put them in the fridge to stop/slow fermentation (after ten days, there is almost no gas escaping, so the jars can be capped tightly and stored in a cool, out of the way place).

I think these are amazingly good - and so much better than a vinegar dill pickle - these are the authentic Jewish Sour Dills.

I just did a post on my blog on Lacto Fermentation - all kinds of additional info there: https://drfugawe.wordpress.com/
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Old 10-20-2010, 12:30 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drfugawe View Post
I use a very simple process - for cukes, I make a med brine (2-3 Tbs kosher salt in a quart of water), use clean quart jars, add pickling spices/garlic/dill, etc. (a grape leaf or two will make pickles crisper), fill jar with brine, use something to hold the cukes under the surface of the brine (important!), cover loosely with the canning lid - half sours take 2-3 days, full sours take 4-5 days or longer.

The brine will always be cloudy, and may have bubbles, foam, and maybe even a little white mold - no problem, just skim it off and recap. But if you can't/don't keep the pickles under the brine, you will have more mold, and the pickles may soften.

Once the pickles are done to your satisfaction, you can put them in the fridge to stop/slow fermentation (after ten days, there is almost no gas escaping, so the jars can be capped tightly and stored in a cool, out of the way place).

I think these are amazingly good - and so much better than a vinegar dill pickle - these are the authentic Jewish Sour Dills.

I just did a post on my blog on Lacto Fermentation - all kinds of additional info there: https://drfugawe.wordpress.com/
Thank you for the recipe and links. Nice blog. I just spent an hour or two exploring.

You mention adding grape leaves. Is it okay to use grape leaves that come in a can?

There were recipes for sauerkraut. That reminded me that Danes make sauerkraut (surkål in Danish), so I found a recipe for making that at my Danish cooking website.

I'm all excited to start trying out this lacto-fermentation. I'm going to go find some pickling cukes tomorrow. I already have homemade whey in the fridge :D
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Old 10-20-2010, 11:57 AM   #15
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taxlady,
I'm not sure if using preserved grape leaves will work - I do remember that it's the tannic acid that creates the magic, and that sour cherry, horseradish leaves, and other plants have goodly amounts of tannin as well. But I'd guess that the liquid in the preserving process draws out the tannic acid - maybe using a Tbs of the juice from the jar will work. Tea leaves also have high levels of tannin.

Good luck with your pickles - they are delicious.
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Old 10-20-2010, 02:42 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drfugawe View Post
taxlady,
I'm not sure if using preserved grape leaves will work - I do remember that it's the tannic acid that creates the magic, and that sour cherry, horseradish leaves, and other plants have goodly amounts of tannin as well. But I'd guess that the liquid in the preserving process draws out the tannic acid - maybe using a Tbs of the juice from the jar will work. Tea leaves also have high levels of tannin.

Good luck with your pickles - they are delicious.
Thanks.

I Googled substitutes for grape leaves, and the only substitute I could find was alum o_O However, a couple of sites said that if I cut off the blossom end of the pickles, that should eliminate the enzymes that soften pickles. I think I'll ask if any of my friends have any grape vines growing.
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Old 10-20-2010, 04:23 PM   #17
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You also cood use horse rediesh leaves, tart chery leaves and black curant leaves all for the same purpose.
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Old 10-20-2010, 09:17 PM   #18
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You also cood use horse rediesh leaves, tart chery leaves and black curant leaves all for the same purpose.
That's good to know. I'll ask friends about all of those.
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Old 10-22-2010, 09:24 AM   #19
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I just saw an episode of Ask Aida. They addressed the question of blue garlic. Aida said that two things can cause it. Either the acid in the recipe reacted with the pigment in the garlic and turned it colors or the garlic came in contact with copper which will cause the same reaction. She said that it usually goes away after a while but in any case it is safe to eat.
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Old 10-23-2010, 12:06 PM   #20
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Quote:
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I Googled substitutes for grape leaves, and the only substitute I could find was alum o_O However, a couple of sites said that if I cut off the blossom end of the pickles, that should eliminate the enzymes that soften pickles.
Cutting off the blossom end of the pickles (required) has nothing to do with the crispness of the pickle. If you can't find fresh grape leaves, consider buying Ball "Pickle Crisp" or food grade Calcium Chloride. Does the same thing and is much safer than alum or lime soaks.
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