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Old 06-25-2018, 07:34 PM   #11
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We have different rules for safe canning in the United States.

That's because the United States has more difficult, more negative, more dangerous bacteria than that bacteria in other places.
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Old 06-25-2018, 07:40 PM   #12
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That's because the United States has more difficult, more negative, more dangerous bacteria than that bacteria in other places.
If you want to give people advice that might endanger them, go ahead. I don't.
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Old 06-25-2018, 07:57 PM   #13
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gotgarlic, lol
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:16 PM   #14
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gotgarlic, lol
Honestly, bliss. Grow tf up.
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:16 PM   #15
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While we're on the subject of canning, can someone explain to me why when you've made jam and presumably sealed it properly, Americans find it necessary to can it as well?

I've been making jam, marmalade, pickles and chutneys since I was about 10 years old (under Grandmother's supervision) and I had never heard of canning the completed jam or marmalade until I saw "The Pioneer Woman" teaching children to do it on TV and heard people talking about it on here.

When I was packing to move house I found a jar of my home-made blackberry jam dated 5 years previously. When open it was completely edible and tasted no different to "younger" jars.

I follow (as I was taught) the official British Government rules for making jam & marmalade and I have never had a jar ferment or develop mould except when I've used beet sugar rather than cane sugar. (Both are freely available in the UK.) The one thing I do now insist on when I am making jam & marmalade that it's essential to use cane sugar not beet sugar. I had a few failures before I came across this in an article written by the Women's Institute's Head jam competition Judge. Never had any problems since. Perhaps this is why American need to can jam?
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:24 PM   #16
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Well, if you are roasting tomatoes, then roast the garlic and the onions too. Instead of using oil, roast it on parchment paper. Keep your oven temperature below the point of burning paper, so under 400 degrees F. The roasting has the effect of drying out the tomatoes along with the slight charring, giving it flavor and I'm all in favor of that. One of the issues with tomatoes is the large amount of water present, so by roasting you will make them more concentrated in flavor. I wouldn't add back in any water. I'd use the dried basil too.



After you blend it all, you'll have a concentrated mixture of roasted tomatoes, onions, garlic, and basil, then add the lemon juice, can it. When you get to using it, you can always add more water/broth and you can add cream. I'm sure it will be delightful.


There is nothing better in the winter when the cold season arrives, than some tomato soup base with some cream, or a pat of butter on the top, and some crackers or grilled cheese to dip in it. I hope it turns out delicious for you.
And Bliss, you would water bath can it?
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:27 PM   #17
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Got Garlic and Blissful have given you excellent advice. Since you are rather new to canning, I would listen to both of them. Also, Blissful gave you some excellent referrals for additional professional information. Tomatoes can be a very tricky vegetable to can if done wrong.

You might want to buy the Blue Book of Canning. There are several books with tried and true recipes. And these books have been broken down to veggies, fruits, meats etc.

Do let us know how you made out and what you did.

And just one more thing. Welcome to Discuss Cooking. We always enjoy new members and want to wish everyone success no matter what the are interested in from the world of food. As you probably noticed, we have members from all over the world.
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Old 06-25-2018, 09:42 PM   #18
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Yes, water bath can it.
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Old 06-26-2018, 12:45 AM   #19
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I've been making plum, tomato, relish curry onions gerkins for 20 years, prolly 100 litres a year, never had 1 jar or bottle go bad. It works for my, so I won't be canning,lol.

Russ
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