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Old 05-11-2010, 03:50 PM   #1
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Canning Jar Question

Canning Jar Question

H, if you have a canner that holds 7 quarts, or x amount of pint jars if you have less than enough to completely fill the canner full, can you put less than the maximum amount of jars in the canner and process anyway?

Thanks,

Ken

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Old 05-11-2010, 03:59 PM   #2
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Yes, but will need to add enough water to cover the lids completely. Also, there is a risk that the jars will fall over during the canning process (if they are free-standing on a rack).
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:11 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Linda123 View Post
Yes, but will need to add enough water to cover the lids completely. Also, there is a risk that the jars will fall over during the canning process (if they are free-standing on a rack).
Thanks Linda.

I’m nearly 60 years old and have never canned anything in my life, so please excuse my ignorance.
  • What is the importance of having the water over the lids?
  • Are you talking water bath canner, pressure canner, or both?
  • Would it hurt to put empty jars, or jars with water only in the canner to take up the empty spaces while canning.
Thank you,

Ken
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:31 PM   #4
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I use the waterbath canner but I only can pickles. you could put jars full of water in the bath to keep the others from falling over - if you put empty jars in the canner, they will float.

I've forgotten "why" we need to cover the jars...but the waterbath method is only okay for high-acid foods - tomatoes, pickles and jellies/jams.

Try googling "water bath canning" for more information. Here is one site I found: Boiling Water Bath Canning - Virginia Cooperative Extension

Good luck.
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:39 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Linda123 View Post
I use the waterbath canner but I only can pickles. you could put jars full of water in the bath to keep the others from falling over - if you put empty jars in the canner, they will float.

I've forgotten "why" we need to cover the jars...but the waterbath method is only okay for high-acid foods - tomatoes, pickles and jellies/jams.

Try googling "water bath canning" for more information. Here is one site I found: Boiling Water Bath Canning - Virginia Cooperative Extension

Good luck.
Thank you Linda. I appreciate the info.

Ken
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Old 05-11-2010, 04:56 PM   #6
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Ken - if you've never canned anything in your life & this is your first time, I hope you're closely following a recipe from a current canning "bible". I only ask this because of your query re: making sure the lids are covered with water, a topic that definitely would be thoroughly covered in a good canning book. Wouldn't want your first canning experience to be your last - for more than one unpleasant reason - lol!!
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Old 05-11-2010, 06:52 PM   #7
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Ken - if you've never canned anything in your life & this is your first time, I hope you're closely following a recipe from a current canning "bible". I only ask this because of your query re: making sure the lids are covered with water, a topic that definitely would be thoroughly covered in a good canning book. Wouldn't want your first canning experience to be your last - for more than one unpleasant reason - lol!!
Breezy, thanks for your reply and concern. Actually the first thing I'm going to attempt to can will be peas. I will follow the instructions and recipe closely. Actually Iím kinda nervous about the whole process. Hopefully this time next year Iíll feel like an old pro. Currently I just feel old period, LOL.

I havenít found any info in my canning books concerning the question about processing when the canner isnít completely full, and thatís why I ask. I will probably can everything that I can with a pressure canner. That is why I wanted to clarify the statement about filling the canner above the lids.

Iím sure Iíll be asking lots of questions that may seem juvenile to all the long time canners. Please bare with the newbie (me).

Thanks friend,

Ken
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Old 05-11-2010, 07:26 PM   #8
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Goodness - I'm no canner outside of a few pickles, so peas are something I'd consider an advanced project - lol!

If you've done your research, I'm sure you know that peas are something that MUST be pressure-canned, & that instructions have to be followed to the dead-letter.

I probably shouldn't even log in on this thread since canning scares me to death due to nearly dying (seriously) from an improperly processed pickled jalapeno pepper gift from a close relative. Doctor told me that if I had eaten more than the one single pepper I did, that they wouldn't have been able to save me no matter how quickly I'd gotten to the hospital.
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Old 05-11-2010, 07:34 PM   #9
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Goodness - I'm no canner outside of a few pickles, so peas are something I'd consider an advanced project - lol!

If you've done your research, I'm sure you know that peas are something that MUST be pressure-canned, & that instructions have to be followed to the dead-letter.

I probably shouldn't even log in on this thread since canning scares me to death due to nearly dying (seriously) from an improperly processed pickled jalapeno pepper gift from a close relative. Doctor told me that if I had eaten more than the one single pepper I did, that they wouldn't have been able to save me no matter how quickly I'd gotten to the hospital.
Breezy, as little experience and knowledge you feel you have, youíve already proved to me you have more of both than me. Actually canning pickled jalapenos is one of the items on my list this year. I love them. Now youíve gone and scared the pickling salt right outa me.

Thanks friend,

Ken
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Old 05-11-2010, 08:03 PM   #10
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Oh goodness - I really didn't mean to do that!!! I just wanted to scare into you the importance of precisely following the CURRENT instructions for whatever canning projects you undertake.

In my unfortunate situation, my gifter "pickled" his peppers including a large amount of olive oil in the liquid, & also used old-fashioned metal-clasp jars which, while attractive, aren't considered safe in many/most applications.

Regardless, I lived - but I wouldn't wish what I went through on my worst enemy.

Peas, being a low-acid food, have to be canned by VERY stringent standards. Please make sure you follow them!
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