"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-19-2007, 06:39 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2
Question Canning pumpkin question

I have four pumpkins to cook down and preserve as pumpkin puree. I qassume this will be like canning applesauce. I have done that. But I have two problems. When I do applesauce, the applesauce and the jars are hot. When I cook and peel pumpkins, the pumpkins are no longer hot by the time it reaches a jar. And, the jars weren't heated. And of course, by now all is in fridge. Is there a way to can starting with cold jars and food? I have done steam canning, water bathing and have a pressure cooker if needed. Any help is much appreciated.

__________________

__________________
tobreth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 06:45 PM   #2
Everymom
 
Alix's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Edmonton, Alberta
Posts: 23,184
Going to take a look, but I'm pretty sure you would have to pressure can that stuff. Back shortly.
__________________

__________________
You're only given a little spark of madness. You mustn't lose it. Robin Williams
Alix
Alix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 06:51 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
National Center for Home Food Preservation

Great Information here
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 08:00 PM   #4
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
You DEFINITELY have to use a pressure canner for pumpkin, and it has to cook a good amount of time, because it is so dense.

The best way to cook fresh pumpkin used to be to cut the it in half, put it upside down on a foil-covered baking sheet, and cook in a 350 degree oven until it's soft and mushy. You then run it through a food mill, and go from there with the instructions you'll find on the above web sites.
I don't bother with fresh pumpkin anymore, but I'll bet you could prepare it the same way as above in the microwave...thing being, you could only do one half at a time. If I were faced with several pumpkins to cook, I'd use them both.

Be aware that your fresh pumpkin will not be orange like the canned product. This is because what you get in a can is not pumpkin...It's butternut squash. That doesn't mean your pumpkin won't be delicious...
I's just tan instead of orange.

I have had a couple of gardeners give me what they called "punkin". One turned out to be a Hubbard squash (BIG). The other, given to by my neighbor's maid's husband, back in the mid 60's when I lived on the bayou, was a big, green and white striped thing with a thick neck, called a Cushaw. I had no idea how to cook it, so I cut the whole thing up in 2" cubes (very hard cutting without a good knife) and simmered them in a pot with a little water. It took me hours to fix, but turned out sort of OK. The next time I talked to Naomi, the neighbor's maid and my forbidden friend, she said she would have gladly cooked that punkin for me.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 08:14 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Cushaw maybe Miss Connie...
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 08:27 PM   #6
Master Chef
 
Constance's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Southern Illiniois
Posts: 8,175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Cushaw maybe Miss Connie...
I shouldn't have wasted my time googling...I knew you would know.

Thanks, as always.
__________________
We get by with a little help from our friends
Constance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2007, 08:33 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Constance View Post
I shouldn't have wasted my time googling...I knew you would know.

Thanks, as always.
You're welcome Miss Connie!

Merry Christmas!!!
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2007, 02:33 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2
I usually try not to cook the pumpkin until i am ready to make pumpkin pie. I boil the pumpkin and use it a short time later. If anything is left over, it is immediately put in the freezer. The smaller varieties of pumpkins make better pumpkin pie compared to the larger "Jack-O-Lantern" pumpkins. I used pumpkin frozen the day before Thanksgiving for pie on December 23 and the pie turned out very well. freezing should keep the processed pumpkin good for months.
__________________
flbigdogowner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2007, 10:30 AM   #9
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Most pumpkins/winter squash will keep quite well whole--I have 5 or 6 that I grew this summer still sitting in my sunroom. I cook them when I need them, and refrigerate/freeze leftovers.

I never bother with cooking pretty orange jack-o-lantern type pumpkins--they are stringy and watery. When I want "pumpkin" pie, I use butternut squash. (And I don't tell my kids--they don't "like" butternut squash pie. But they sure eat it up if they think it is pumpkin.)
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2008, 01:28 PM   #10
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
Great Information here
thanks for the link, it was very helpful
__________________

__________________
gauzzastrip is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.