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Old 04-23-2011, 06:08 PM   #11
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My pressure cooker phobia came from, as a kid, a lady from our church was severely burned from an exploding pressure cooker. I realize they have come a long way, but personally, I would rather swim with sharks.

BTW, love my glass top!
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Old 04-23-2011, 09:51 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by lilcee View Post
That's funny lol.
That presto - pressure/canner looks good. Do you know if you can use it on a glass cook top? I'm kinda afraid of scratching it or cracking it. Maybe I should get a separate burner
I have this pressure canner. It does have a flat bottom. Which is necessary for a smooth top/glass stove. You do however, need to check with your owner's manual for the stove because not all of them are able to handle the weight of a canner with water and jars of food. Check you manual, make sure you have a flat bottom canner. Also you must not slide the canner across the glass you need to lift it up and set it down. Ball now makes a flat bottom, stainless steel, water bath canner with a glass lid so you can actually see the boiling inside. It is higher in price than the traditional enamel canners but the only flat bottom one that I know of. I got mine "here"

I do wish that I had gotten a different pressure canner. I found out I would like the one with the gauge, and the pressure regulator weight with settings of 5, 10, 15 psi. My reason is that if you have just the regulator like the Presto does you have to have that checked every year for accuracy with you local county exchange office. At least with both the gauge and the weighted regulator you have a back up to know pressure without having to have the gauge checked each year. My new Presto gauge was off new out of the box so I always have calculate the adjustment for what the gauge is off.
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Old 04-24-2011, 07:20 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Dawgluver View Post
My pressure cooker phobia came from, as a kid, a lady from our church was severely burned from an exploding pressure cooker. I realize they have come a long way, but personally, I would rather swim with sharks.

BTW, love my glass top!
My cousin had an attack of appendicitis and her roommate in the hospital was a poor lady who had a girdle and a polyesther pantsuit on when hers exploded. She over-filled it and it couldn't vent, thus the explosion.

My mother kept using hers, though I wouldn't go in the kitchen when it was being used. I would never buy one as an adult though someone gave us one a couple of years ago. We've used it a few times but never anywhere near capacity and I'm still hesitant about using it and a bit nervous even though they have come a long way.
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Old 04-24-2011, 09:22 AM   #14
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My cousin had an attack of appendicitis and her roommate in the hospital was a poor lady who had a girdle and a polyesther pantsuit on when hers exploded. She over-filled it and it couldn't vent, thus the explosion.

My mother kept using hers, though I wouldn't go in the kitchen when it was being used. I would never buy one as an adult though someone gave us one a couple of years ago. We've used it a few times but never anywhere near capacity and I'm still hesitant about using it and a bit nervous even though they have come a long way.

I'm really not sure what I want now. My husband says pressure canner and I say water bath one. I've never used a pressure canner. I'm mostly going to can fruits (peaches, pears, apples, cherries). If that's all I'm canning then a water bath would do the work wouldn't it? I'm nervous about getting a pressure canner. I can't use a water bath canner on my cook top but I can get a separate burner for that. I think the only reason he was thinking of a pressure canner was so we could can things like beets and beans.
Decisions, decisions
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Old 04-24-2011, 09:29 AM   #15
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I have never used a glass cook top. I have read here that most of the scratching comes from sliding ones pots and pans on the surface...
Or when your husband decides to scrape off a baked on spill...
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Old 04-24-2011, 09:37 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilcee View Post
I'm really not sure what I want now. My husband says pressure canner and I say water bath one. I've never used a pressure canner. I'm mostly going to can fruits (peaches, pears, apples, cherries). If that's all I'm canning then a water bath would do the work wouldn't it? I'm nervous about getting a pressure canner. I can't use a water bath canner on my cook top but I can get a separate burner for that. I think the only reason he was thinking of a pressure canner was so we could can things like beets and beans.
Decisions, decisions
If it were me, I would get the pressure canner. You can water bath can in a pressure canner.

When I had a pressure canner, I used it for all my canning. Sometimes it's quicker. The big advantage was that I never had a lid not seal (or a jar break) in the pressure canner. I seem to remember that it didn't heat the kitchen as much.

When I split up with my ex, he got the pressure canner. I can't think of any other thing I regret more, letting him keep.
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Old 04-24-2011, 09:47 AM   #17
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If it were me, I would get the pressure canner. You can water bath can in a pressure canner.

When I had a pressure canner, I used it for all my canning. Sometimes it's quicker. The big advantage was that I never had a lid not seal (or a jar break) in the pressure canner. I seem to remember that it didn't heat the kitchen as much.

When I split up with my ex, he got the pressure canner. I can't think of any other thing I regret more, letting him keep.
Thanks for all your help. That's probably what I'll do
Happy Easter!
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:14 AM   #18
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Several things--I work for U of Missouri Extension, and we get a zillion canning questions. You need to be safe, whatever you decide to do.

Water bath canning is for high acid or high sugar foods--fruit, jellies, jams. Pressure canning is for low acid foods, like beans, beets, meats. Tomatoes kind of fall in the middle, and adding extra acid is necessary for safe waterbath canning. (Just cause Mama or Grandma did it that way, and didn't kill anybody, doesn't mean you can do it that way!)

Pressure canners and pressure cookers are NOT the same. A pressure canner is larger and has something (a gauge or weight) that allows you to adjust the internal pressure. A cooker is generally smaller and not adjustable. You need the larger volume for canning, because the time that it takes to get the canner up to pressure is calculated into the recipes. A smaller cooker takes less time, so your food may not be processed long enough. (Lots of people call their pressure canners 'cookers', so sometimes it is a matter of common names. If you have a gauge or dial, and if you can put 4 quart jars in it, it is a canner.)

I do most of my canning in the pressure canner (I almost said pressure cooker--that is what I call it, but it is big and has a weight) because it is quicker and it does heat the kitchen up less than a big waterbath canner.

New canners (and by that, I mean canners made after about 1975) have multiple safety features that pretty much eliminate horrible accidents. They have a rubber or soft metal safety plug that melts when the canner overheats--if you run off and leave your pressure canner/cooker on the stove, you will come home to find the contents on the ceiling, but the canner itself will not explode. (Following directions and paying attention will pretty much eliminate the food on the ceiling problem!)

This site National Center for Home Food Preservation | USDA Publications has everything you need to know to can safely (and stuff about freezing and drying.) As a beginner, be wary of internet recipes, granny's recipes and any books besides this one or the Ball Blue Book--New BallŪ Canning Products

Ball has another book with more tested recipes, but I can't remember the name of it right now--we have it at the office.

Use real canning jars--not mayo jars. Don't reuse the flat part of the lid--you can reuse the ring.

And enjoy--there is great satisfaction in hearing that little 'ping' as the jar seals, and seeing your hard work lined up on the counter. Of course, popping the top on a jar of summer canned tomatoes in the dead of winter is pretty cool, too!

There are lots of home canners on this board--don't hesitate to ask questions.

These two books contain tested recipes.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:19 AM   #19
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One more thing--a pressure canner or water bath canner is HEAVY. Make it easier on yourself by putting the canner on the stove, pouring water in from another pot, and then put the jars in. When the food is processed, lift the jars out, then dip the water out with a smaller pot or big measuring cup.

If you use a portable burner, do all this outside on the porch--keeps your kitchen cooler and less messy. Be careful if you use a burner inside--you will be generating a lot of heat--don't melt your formica or crack your granite.

I have heard of folks using a big turkey fryer for canning.
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Old 04-24-2011, 10:54 AM   #20
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Thank you for that info on pressure canners Sparrowgrass.

Since I read in Joy of Cooking, "Be sure also to exhaust the air from the canner for at least 10 minutes before closing the petcock or steam vent so that no cold spots develop to cause the food to be under-processed." I thought I could use a pressure cooker for canning. I stand corrected.

The canner that I no longer own was a Presto, sold as a canner (in ~1987), but it didn't have a dial. It had weights for 5, 10, and 15 lbs pressure. Is that good enough?
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