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Old 04-30-2009, 12:58 AM   #1
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Canning Tomatoes

I am getting ready to go buy a bunch of tomato plants but I am wondering what kind to get. I would like to can most of them. Mostly for sauces and stew. Not sure what kind to buy. Their are a ton of difffernt kinds. So far I have a couple Roma Tomato starts. I have heard that they are good for sauces.

Any feed back would be appreciated.

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Old 04-30-2009, 08:16 AM   #2
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Roma are good for sauce and canning, but you will

need more than 2 plants. While 2 plants may produce enough tomatoes for you in a whole season you need to have enough ripe at one time for a batch big enough to can. Depending on your growing conditions I would suggest 6 to 12 roma plants. I also plant a tomato variety called Heinz.
They are a medium size tomato. Good for eating, freezing, and canning.
This is the variety that my Father grew for years. I saved seeds from last year and they are growing now. I would not suggest a large size tomato like Beefsteak for canning or any of the sweet varieties. Try to find a higher acid tomato. I am planting a dozen of the Heinz, and will buy 12 Roma, give 4 away and plant 8. That is all I have room for or I would plant more. I would like to be able to can enough to last me 2 years.
That way I could rotate crops better but I do what I can.
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Old 04-30-2009, 08:52 AM   #3
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We have 6 plants ... 2 early girl, 2 beefsteak and 2 of another line that I can't remember (it's like "Aha" or "Glory" or something). We ate ourselves sick on them in the fall and I had enough to can 24+ quart jars. I gave up on the Roma's a few years ago because I just couldn't get them to ripen well.
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Old 04-30-2009, 09:40 AM   #4
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I would suggest you contact your local horticulturist/garden center to see what varieties are best suited to your growing area....Plant plenty...A dozen or more...Some years yields are low (my minimum is 50 plants) This assures me enough to gorge on, and plenty to can, make juice etc. In years when a bumper crop is made you can also make a lot of friends Do try to can a few quarts of juice...If you've never had a Bloody Mary made from home canned tomato juice.....Wow!! There is no comparison!!!

Luck and Fun!
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Old 04-30-2009, 10:52 AM   #5
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IMO, Roma's are the best for canning. They are meaty, with few seeds, and a prolific producer. Some years, when we've had bad weather, the Romas were the only ones that did any good.
When I was doing a lot of canning, I'd put out 100 Romas. That would be way too many for the average person though...Uncle Bob's 50 is much more reasonable.
Don't forget to put out a few plants for slicing...my favorite slicer is Big Beef, but there are many other good ones...Brandywine, Supersonic, and Georgia Streak are three more of my personal favorites.
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Old 04-30-2009, 03:57 PM   #6
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I do wonder about the safety of home canning - one must be very careful about sanitizing all equipment. Seems so much easier to buy canned products ready made. I would use fresh produce for cooking only.
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Old 04-30-2009, 04:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recipes Cookbook Writer View Post
I do wonder about the safety of home canning - one must be very careful about sanitizing all equipment. Seems so much easier to buy canned products ready made. I would use fresh produce for cooking only.
The vast majority of people who do home canning are well schooled/versed about the safe handling practices of home canning. I am far more concerned about contaminants (rodent hair, fly fecal material, etc,)found in "ready made" products than home canned items where I KNOW what goes in the jar.

Enjoy!!!
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Old 04-30-2009, 11:31 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recipes Cookbook Writer View Post
Seems so much easier to buy canned products ready made. I would use fresh produce for cooking only.
True. You live in modern times where you are close to grocery and other stores and have transportation technology to bring fresh food in from all parts of the world. Canning was a necessity in early days when such was not available, but it is becoming more popular because it is cheaper and you can eliminate all the salt and preservatives in the foods. I especially love making my own condiments and known that it has less salt and sugars and no preservatives.
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Old 04-30-2009, 11:44 PM   #9
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I agree with mcnerd. I enjoy doing it because I can grow a garden and it's cheaper than buying it from the store. Plus I have control of salt and sugar added that doesn't need to be. With a husband with high blood pressure. . . . .
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Old 05-01-2009, 08:01 AM   #10
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Plus the home canned tomatoes just taste so much

better than the ones from the store. Every single one that I can is RIPE.
That does not happen with store bought ones.
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