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Old 08-04-2013, 07:44 PM   #31
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She (who must be obeyed) already has me canning 20+ Qts of potatoes and a few pints of fresh corn! Love Canning!!
Shrek says he has one of those, too!
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Old 08-04-2013, 08:19 PM   #32
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Shriek is a lucky man!
(And must be good at taking orders)
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Old 08-05-2013, 08:27 AM   #33
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Seriously craig? Do you not get the purpose of canning? And when your power goes out and everything in your freezer goes bad, then what would you eat?
The meatball go into the jar with the sauce.
And there must be a way to add Pasta too where it won't go mushy.
Well I'm going to answer since we've been thru hurricanes with no power afterward, all you have to do is heat some water up with sterno or a camp stove or a grill and put rice or pasta in it and let it sit. Takes a little longer and it's not always the best texture (can be a little gummy, but at least not mush) but it gets the job done. And before you bring up about not having any of the above, IMO anybody who is in a position to be in a location where power is out long enough for everything in your freezer to go bad and be worried about canning to have food to eat and doesn't have some kind of back up to cook food is just foolish. The smart and economical thing to do is use the food out of your freezer first, even if you have to cook everything at once on the grill, and then the canned stuff if the power doesn't come back on before.

We ate very well after Andrew just using the grill. So did some of our neighbors. We had been diving the whole weekend before Andrew hit S Florida and had caught about 40 lobsters and some fish from just those 2 days plus what was already in the deep freezer. Even grilled lobster gets old after a while so we traded.

Since then, we bought a little genny so now I have a double buffet burner set plus the toaster oven and microwave plus the grill, as well as camp stove for back-up. Only thing I can't use is the full-size oven.

As far as Chef Boy R Dee, NEVER AGAIN. Got nostalgic a couple of years ago with Craig's brother when I was staying with him due to his medical problems. We decided to have a childhood favorite for dinner one night. GAG, taste and texture wise. We ended up getting takeout.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:47 AM   #34
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I live in the city and all our wiring is underground. Just recently we were sitting down on the patio and all the street lights went out. Since we have electric stoves, the question came up about what would we do if we ever lost our electricity for any length of time. Some of the residents were not thinking to clearly. Live on sandwiches, go to a family member's home, etc. I calmly pointed out the answer was right there in front of their eyes and right next to where they were sitting. We have a very large gas grill and management pays for the filling of the gas tanks. Stay home and live for the adventure.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:40 AM   #35
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I live in the city and all our wiring is underground. Just recently we were sitting down on the patio and all the street lights went out. Since we have electric stoves, the question came up about what would we do if we ever lost our electricity for any length of time. Some of the residents were not thinking to clearly. Live on sandwiches, go to a family member's home, etc. I calmly pointed out the answer was right there in front of their eyes and right next to where they were sitting. We have a very large gas grill and management pays for the filling of the gas tanks. Stay home and live for the adventure.
How many people live in your building?
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:56 AM   #36
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Well I'm going to answer since we've been thru hurricanes with no power afterward, all you have to do is heat some water up with sterno or a camp stove or a grill and put rice or pasta in it and let it sit. Takes a little longer and it's not always the best texture (can be a little gummy, but at least not mush) but it gets the job done. And before you bring up about not having any of the above, IMO anybody who is in a position to be in a location where power is out long enough for everything in your freezer to go bad and be worried about canning to have food to eat and doesn't have some kind of back up to cook food is just foolish. The smart and economical thing to do is use the food out of your freezer first, even if you have to cook everything at once on the grill, and then the canned stuff if the power doesn't come back on before.

We ate very well after Andrew just using the grill. So did some of our neighbors. We had been diving the whole weekend before Andrew hit S Florida and had caught about 40 lobsters and some fish from just those 2 days plus what was already in the deep freezer. Even grilled lobster gets old after a while so we traded.

Since then, we bought a little genny so now I have a double buffet burner set plus the toaster oven and microwave plus the grill, as well as camp stove for back-up. Only thing I can't use is the full-size oven.
+1 We and our neighbors did the same after Isabel left us without electricity for a week and without water for five days. But, I had bought several gallons of bottled water, for drinking, washing and COFFEE, and filled the bathtub so we could flush the toilet, so we were in good shape.

In addition, any new grill we buy is going to have at least one burner (like our current one does) so using a saucepan on it won't be a problem. And, we have a gas furnace, water heater and stove, so that hasn't been a problem. More recently, I was put on very expensive medication that needs to be refrigerated, so we got a generator a couple of years ago and deducted the cost from our taxes.

I think it makes much more sense to plan on having a way to cook rice and pasta as needed rather than take the risk of home-canning it. There's a reason why there's no mention of it in the Blue Ball book.
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:12 AM   #37
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How many people live in your building?
There are 42 apartments and some of them are husband/wife. And I know of one elderly daughter that lives with her elderly mother. So I would say about 49-50 people. Some of the residents get meals on wheels and don't do any cooking at all in their apartments. And I know of two apartments that the kids cook every day for their parent.

Would it be feasible to cook food on the grill for about 40-45 residents? I think so. Not all of them eat at the same time. And we do have two residents who love to grill so they would be thrilled to stay down there all day and cook for them as long as they brought their own food. I don't see our electricity being out for more than two meals. And a lot of folks here don't eat breakfast.

Should it become too cold for them to eat out on the patio, they can always go inside to the Community Room and eat in the dining area. There are plenty of utensils and any needed equipment in the kitchen. Including plates and cups. It is a fully equipped kitchen included s&p, sugar and all the other condiments. Only the food is missing.
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Old 08-06-2013, 06:30 AM   #38
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+1 We and our neighbors did the same after Isabel left us without electricity for a week and without water for five days. But, I had bought several gallons of bottled water, for drinking, washing and COFFEE, and filled the bathtub so we could flush the toilet, so we were in good shape.
Just a little tip, at the start of storm season, rinse empty 2 L soda bottles and let dry. Once a storm gets close enough that you know you are going to get hit bad enough to lose power, fill about 7/8 full with tap water and fill up your freezer after turning the temp as long as it will go. Several advantages, one a full freezer will stay cold longer, the blocks of ice will keep it cold longer, you can also use in fridge part to keep food in there cool, you have another supply of fresh drinkable water as they melt. Throw the bottles away after use. Don't try to keep them around from season to season, they aren't made to store indefinitely and the plastic degrades, especially after freezing.
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Old 08-06-2013, 07:57 AM   #39
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Originally Posted by Addie View Post
I live in the city and all our wiring is underground. Just recently we were sitting down on the patio and all the street lights went out. Since we have electric stoves, the question came up about what would we do if we ever lost our electricity for any length of time. Some of the residents were not thinking to clearly. Live on sandwiches, go to a family member's home, etc. I calmly pointed out the answer was right there in front of their eyes and right next to where they were sitting. We have a very large gas grill and management pays for the filling of the gas tanks. Stay home and live for the adventure.
In this area Meals on Wheels works with students to assemble and distribute Blizzard Boxes each year to the residents of senior housing. The boxes contain things like tuna, a packet of mayo, juice boxes, pudding cups, crackers and cheese etc.... Enough shelf stable food to keep people going for a day or two. I think it is a great community service project to have the kids assemble and deliver the boxes. If no formal program exists in your area it might be something that you and the other residents could chip in and put together yourselves.
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Old 08-07-2013, 02:25 PM   #40
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Does anyone have some experience or Recipes of Canning a Chicken Noodle Soup or a Pasta sauce with meatballs and Noodles?? Many thanks!
Well, no, I haven't but may I add my two penn'orth?

I would think you'd be better canning without the pasta. Shop-bought dry pasta keeps 'til the crack of doom and it doesn't take long to cook. Commercially canned spaghetti, ravioli, etc., always seems a bit soft and slightly mushy so there would seem to be a likelihood the home-made would too.
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