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Old 07-19-2013, 04:08 PM   #11
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Would milking the cobs with the back of a knife help the flavor? Just curious. I know when ever I cook COTCs I always scrape the cobs for the milk that has so much flavor.
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:28 PM   #12
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Would milking the cobs with the back of a knife help the flavor? Just curious. I know when ever I cook COTCs I always scrape the cobs for the milk that has so much flavor.
I think that would make the liquid cloudy. If you look at pics of the jelly, it's a nice, clear amber color. Boiling is probably better.
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Old 07-19-2013, 04:45 PM   #13
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I think that would make the liquid cloudy. If you look at pics of the jelly, it's a nice, clear amber color. Boiling is probably better.
Okay. This is the first I ever heard of this recipe.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:37 PM   #14
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Okay...made it...

Here are a few thoughts.

First, I think the red cobs are important for the color and flavor. Also, I think you can over-boil the cobs to get the juice. That being said, it's not bad. :)

Secondly, there is a bit of a honey-like flavor. I will definitely like this with biscuits.

Third, I kept wondering who first thought to do this. Maybe it was the original softer option for outhouse living.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:53 PM   #15
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Here are a few thoughts.

First, I think the red cobs are important for the color and flavor. Also, I think you can over-boil the cobs to get the juice. That being said, it's not bad. :)

Secondly, there is a bit of a honey-like flavor. I will definitely like this with biscuits.

Third, I kept wondering who first thought to do this. Maybe it was the original softer option for outhouse living.
I also wonder who thought of this!

At this time of year we have so many wonderful things to make jelly or preserves from, why corncobs?

I can understand corncobs for making a quick hot fire in the cook stove but in the outhouse, no thanks!

Are ya finished reading that Sears Roebuck catalog yet?
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Old 07-22-2013, 08:07 PM   #16
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I also wonder who thought of this!

At this time of year we have so many wonderful things to make jelly or preserves from, why corncobs?

I can understand corncobs for making a quick hot fire in the cook stove but in the outhouse, no thanks!

Are ya finished reading that Sears Roebuck catalog yet?

LOL!!!

In looking up recipes, it called for red cobs from field corn. Simply wagering a guess, I'll bet it was made in the winter as cobs piled up after using the dried corn. Then, dry out those cobs and original Charmin was likely created.
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Old 07-22-2013, 11:49 PM   #17
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Has anyone here ever made this? They say it tastes like honey.
Ahh.. now it makes sense... and I know who to blame.
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:52 PM   #18
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The corn cob jelly did not set up, so I needed to recook it. I got the recipe from this site so I decided to use the suggested remedy from them as well.

I think I will make some biscuits for it and perhaps try it as a glaze on chicken.

National Center for Home Food Preservation | How Do I? Jam and Jelly
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Old 07-23-2013, 08:59 PM   #19
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How long did you wait for it to set up? It can often take weeks for some jams or jellies to gel. Much of it depends on whether you reached a full rolling boil (220F). It's not easy on some stoves.
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Old 07-24-2013, 05:59 AM   #20
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I had never heard of this but it sounds nice
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