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Old 01-20-2010, 03:35 PM   #11
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John, perhaps then your question would be better asked on a design forum. Our posters were trying to help you as best they could. Frankly we have a LOT of experience here and bethzaring is one of our most experienced canners. I'd take her advice in a minute.

Honestly, I think you are asking a question that the posters here are not equipped to answer. Few of us can on the scale you describe (with the notable exception of yourself and bethzaring) so we have nothing to offer you. Now if you were to ask for help on how to can or what recipes to use I think you'd get a lot more play.

Good luck. Hope you find some help.
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Old 01-20-2010, 04:34 PM   #12
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John, perhaps then your question would be better asked on a design forum. Our posters were trying to help you as best they could. Frankly we have a LOT of experience here and bethzaring is one of our most experienced canners. I'd take her advice in a minute.

Honestly, I think you are asking a question that the posters here are not equipped to answer. Few of us can on the scale you describe (with the notable exception of yourself and bethzaring) so we have nothing to offer you. Now if you were to ask for help on how to can or what recipes to use I think you'd get a lot more play.

Good luck. Hope you find some help.
Alix:

A design forum isn't necessary. Nor should it be. All that should be required is someone who has done a lot of canning and can extrapolate what they've learned and apply it to a smaller working space.

When I posted this thread on January 3rd, I also posted it in two different homesteading forums and on the Harvest forum on GardenWeb, just to cover my bases. I got a wealth of responses from each, almost immediately, and was able to get pretty much all of the suggestions and advice that I was after. I'd post links to the threads, but apparently I can't post URLs on here until I have at least 15 posts under my belt.

I did find it odd though that on a website devoted to cooking experts and canning aficionados such as Discuss Cooking, that I got no responses for over two weeks, and then, by a couple of self-proclaimed "experts" who not only didn't address the question, or contribute anything positive, but simply announced that they were happy with how THEY do their own canning and that THEY wouldn't use a separate canning kitchen if it were their house.

That wasn't the question. The question was about how best to DESIGN a seasonal canning kitchen given a list of parameters I had to work with. The decision of WHETHER to build one had already been made.

Odd though that the most helpful and insightful suggestions didn't come from the people busy patting themselves on the back for their decades of canning expertise. Kinda makes you chuckle, eh?



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Old 01-20-2010, 04:51 PM   #13
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John, I'm not patting myself on the back about my canning experience. I made a GOOD suggestion. What would be the point of having a separate space for canning if you couldn't properly have climate control to store them? I do can as much or more than you do (depending on how my garden does), and I was offering what I thought was good advice. You're not going to get through 400+ quarts of marinara in a year, or probably even two and then if you are doing this every year, you are adding to your stash... how it is stored would be the NUMBER ONE concern of mine. Not if I had a separate space for the canning. And you, yourself, said it was a "small cabin". I would think storage would be of utmost importance.

Here's my only suggestion on the design as I'm not about to offer any other kind of suggestion. I'm assuming your "40 quart" canner is the AA 41.5 quart. That's going to be up to 100lbs filled. Rather than a cooktop that has a certain number of burners, I would be thinking about a cooktop that can hold the weight and has the power to bring the canner to temp in a reasonable amount of time. That's my only suggestion.

Also... sorry I had a deadline and wasn't here 2 weeks ago to answer your post. I'll be sure to make it a priority in the future.
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Old 01-20-2010, 05:03 PM   #14
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John, I'm not patting myself on the back about my canning experience. I made a GOOD suggestion. What would be the point of having a separate space for canning if you couldn't properly have climate control to store them?
I wasn't looking for a suggestion regarding whether or not to can in my main kitchen. I was looking for advice on how to design a separate canning kitchen within the 8' x 7' parameters I've got to work with.

And what would lead you to believe that I didn't already have the issue of climate controlled storage already addressed? I even addressed it earlier in this exact thread. Did you not read it?

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how it is stored would be the NUMBER ONE concern of mine. Not if I had a separate space for the canning. And you, yourself, said it was a "small cabin". I would think storage would be of utmost importance.
Proper storage IS of utmost importance. And that issue has already been addressed and dealt with. That's why there was no reason to go into it further.

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Here's my only suggestion on the design as I'm not about to offer any other kind of suggestion. I would be thinking about a cooktop that can hold the weight and has the power to bring the canner to temp in a reasonable amount of time. That's my only suggestion.
I'm going with a cooktop that has the power to bring the canner to temp in a reasonable amount of time. The primary (central) burner on the cooktop can produce 18,000 BTUs. Again, this was ALSO mentioned previously in this thread, and a photo of the particular model to be used was posted.

Let's consider this thread dead.


Cheers.



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Old 01-20-2010, 06:27 PM   #15
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And what would lead you to believe that I didn't already have the issue of climate controlled storage already addressed? I even addressed it earlier in this exact thread. Did you not read it?
You hadn't said anything in your original post about this, which is why MY first post was about enough climate controlled storage in a small cottage.

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Proper storage IS of utmost importance. And that issue has already been addressed and dealt with. That's why there was no reason to go into it further.
However, your original post didn't say anything about that, and as good as we are here, we're not mind-readers.

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I'm going with a cooktop that has the power to bring the canner to temp in a reasonable amount of time. The primary (central) burner on the cooktop can produce 18,000 BTUs. Again, this was ALSO mentioned previously in this thread, and a photo of the particular model to be used was posted.
My point was that the canner you are using is going to be about 100lbs and was asking if the cooktop could produce the power AND hold a heavy canner every day for hours on end. Obviously anything anyone has to say is met with your disdain. You're right, the discussion is over.
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Old 01-20-2010, 06:38 PM   #16
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You hadn't said anything in your original post about this, which is why MY first post was about enough climate controlled storage in a small cottage.
You may find it more prudent in the future to ask specifics about a situation if you're not sure of them, rather than making a bunch of erroneous assumptions. A small cottage doesn't necessarily mean limited food storage. If you're not sure, ask.

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However, your original post didn't say anything about that, and as good as we are here, we're not mind-readers.
My original post may not have directly addressed this issue, but your last post occurred after these issues about climate controlled storage had already been addressed. No one is expecting you to read minds, but rather simply to read the whole thread before posting your response.

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My point was that the canner you are using is going to be about 100lbs and was asking if the cooktop could produce the power AND hold a heavy canner every day for hours on end.
Yes, and yes. And these particular issues were addressed earlier in this thread. Actually, I'd originally considered using a cooktop that would buckle under a 100 lb pot of sauce just for the joy of having to clean it up.

I think you'll find it a more productive use of your time to actually read an entire thread to see what has transpired since you may first have responded to it. Often the points you attempt to address have already been discussed and put to bed, rendering them moot.



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Old 01-20-2010, 06:44 PM   #17
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I have found that when asking for advice the proper way to handle responses is to thank the poster even if they answered a question you did not ask. Getting adversarial certainly does not do you any good.

John you started off on a bit of a nasty tone when seemingly getting upset that no one had responded to your thread. You asked if people here had any canning experience. People then responded with their experience and instead of taking from it what you could you proceeded to get upset with those people because they did not give you what you were looking for. Have you heard the expression you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar?
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Old 01-20-2010, 06:50 PM   #18
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Have you heard the expression you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar?
I think the bigger issue here is the folly of attempting to reason with flies.

No worries.



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Old 01-20-2010, 06:55 PM   #19
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Well I wish you luck in life with that attitude. You will need it.
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Old 01-20-2010, 08:16 PM   #20
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I appreciate the support.


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