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Old 01-21-2010, 10:20 PM   #41
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Andy:

I think I'd be more inclined to go with the original deep double sink, and simply go with the ribbed draining surfaces on both sides of the sink that you suggested. The draining surfaces would be level and flush with the rest of the countertops, so they could be used as part of the main countertops themselves when not being used as draining surfaces.

That's a good call. Thanks for the suggestion.


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Old 01-21-2010, 10:37 PM   #42
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a commercial sink with a single 24" x 24" x 12" bowl and a 36" drainboard on the right side ( like this one ) would set me back $1,350.00.
That is one expensive sink. I don't see why its so spendy!

I know you have it all designed but...

Have you explored the idea of a corner sink like this?

Ultracool baby!

Wish I had the space! I'm really getting into your canning spot!
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Old 01-22-2010, 06:14 PM   #43
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That is a cool corner sink, but unfortunately it's not as deep as I'm looking for. I'm currently considering a double sink by Elkay that's a little over 12" deep; this Elkay corner sink appears to be just under 8".

I'm curious if they make a deeper model. . .


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Old 01-22-2010, 06:46 PM   #44
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Check out this option. Awesome design, and because it's an under mount sink rather than a top mount, there's no lip on the sides of the sink to interfere with ribbed draining surfaces. It would be easy to add one on the side of the sink with the larger bowl.








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Old 01-22-2010, 06:48 PM   #45
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John, how much weight will an under mount sink support?
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Old 01-22-2010, 06:54 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
John, how much weight will an under mount sink support?
No idea. How much were you thinking of subjecting one to?

Here's the PDF specification sheet. They don't address it. But it's a good question.



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Old 01-22-2010, 07:25 PM   #47
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I was thinking of your large canner in the sink with stuff in it.
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Old 01-22-2010, 07:52 PM   #48
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I was thinking of your large canner in the sink with stuff in it.
To clean that 41 1/2 Quart pressure cooker, I'd most likely just tilt it on its side from the countertop over the edge of the large bowl of the sink, spray it out, and wash it by hand. The base of that cooker is 15 3/4" and the width of the larger bowl of the sink is 16". I think I'd just be asking for trouble if I attempted to stand it up in the sink to clean it, even if the sink were top mounted. The rounded base of the sink would probably get scratched by the sharp edge on the bottom of the cooker. No reason to risk it.


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Old 01-22-2010, 08:01 PM   #49
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After I posted that corner sink I realized that you could do it with any two sinks you want! Two full size sinks with the faucet pivoting between them! They could be any size/depth you want!!
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:09 PM   #50
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Cool sink!

I would not worry about the weight issue.Since the mounting hardware the company says is the only way to mount the sink is not even included. I would just double up on the brackets.I think you said that you were going to have butcher block tops will that be throught the kitchen or just certain sections of the tops?I was wondering because they will be a minimum 1 1/4 thick and most likely1 1/2 thick.That would be a huge drop off to the top of the sink.That is not a problem your cabinet guy can cut this sink in to the desired depth and would look great.The real problem with butcher block tops is end grain and water.And two sides of the sink will be end grain.You could seal these with spare urithane but it would look like crap.I would have the installers cut the hole bigger on those two sides and glue in pieces with the grain running the long way and cut to final size.I know that would look awesome and will help keep your top from cracking.
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