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Old 07-25-2012, 07:04 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Only in SOME canned foods.
Sugar is the primary preservative in jams, jellies and canning fruits.
Sugar draws moisture out of ginger, citrus peels and candied fruits making them shelf stable.

If sugar were necessary in pickling recipes it would be included in 'dilly beans', 'pickled peppers' and 'pickled tomatoes'--yet it's not used.
The Kosher Dills recipe from Oregon uses no sugar.
It's my opinion that the preservative in pickles is the vinegar/salt combination. (or Oregon State University Extension is wrong)

Salt is the primary preservative in salting meats and jerky--drawing out the moisture.

I feel pretty confident that sugar is not required for pickling, though some might like what it does to the flavor.
The lemon-rosemary pickled beans I make calls for 2 T of sugar.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:07 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful

Only in SOME canned foods.
Sugar is the primary preservative in jams, jellies and canning fruits.
Sugar draws moisture out of ginger, citrus peels and candied fruits making them shelf stable.

If sugar were necessary in pickling recipes it would be included in 'dilly beans', 'pickled peppers' and 'pickled tomatoes'--yet it's not used.
The Kosher Dills recipe from Oregon uses no sugar.
It's my opinion that the preservative in pickles is the vinegar/salt combination. (or Oregon State University Extension is wrong)

Salt is the primary preservative in salting meats and jerky--drawing out the moisture.

I feel pretty confident that sugar is not required for pickling, though some might like what it does to the flavor.
Hmm. Maybe use the same recipe as your dilly beans, but sub your cukes for the beans.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:25 PM   #23
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Hmm. Maybe use the same recipe as your dilly beans, but sub your cukes for the beans.
I have thought about this. The recipe for dilly beans is a tested recipe through most of the university extensions, the vinegar to water ratio is almost one to one, while pickles are a little less vinegar to water, 3/4 to one. The dill pickle chips I want to make will probably use the least required vinegar for a tested recipe and heavy on the salt--it's just for hamburgers--at least in this house.

I read the University of Minnesota pickle bill and they had interesting SAFE information regarding different PH's required for different foods.
Here: Pickle Bill Fact Sheet
Examples of pH for different foods (for selling home canned foods)


dill pickles (pH 2.6-3.8), tomatoes (pH 3.7-4.9), distilled water (pH 7), garlic (pH 5.3-6.3).

Beans cannot, say, be sold when canned from the kitchen because they are considered low acid food and it makes sense that the pickling solution for them is stronger than for cucumbers.

Good suggestions--now I've stretched my cucumber pickling brain as far as I ever hope to go.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:28 PM   #24
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now I've stretched my cucumber pickling brain as far as I ever hope to go.
You certainly have put a lot of thought and research on this. I truly hope you will have success with your pickles.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:29 PM   #25
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The lemon-rosemary pickled beans I make calls for 2 T of sugar.
Well, it could be for taste?

It could be it's not a tested recipe--what kind of authority is used in Canning in Canada or do you use the same university extension offices for reference?

Alternately, botanically, beans are considered a fruit (and I bet cucumbers are considered a fruit too). Yet, that is probably not here nor there, is it?

Also, please send me a can/jar of them, I'll test them for you.
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:32 PM   #26
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You certainly have put a lot of thought and research on this. I truly hope you will have success with your pickles.
Hoot, hoot, hoot, it was partially your previously stated opinion above that really made me want to look into it a bit further--so I appreciate that!
I love your avatar--nice beard! Thank you for your support!
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Old 07-25-2012, 07:34 PM   #27
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You are welcome and thank ye kindly, ma'am.
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:35 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I have thought about this. The recipe for dilly beans is a tested recipe through most of the university extensions, the vinegar to water ratio is almost one to one, while pickles are a little less vinegar to water, 3/4 to one. The dill pickle chips I want to make will probably use the least required vinegar for a tested recipe and heavy on the salt--it's just for hamburgers--at least in this house.

I read the University of Minnesota pickle bill and they had interesting SAFE information regarding different PH's required for different foods.
Here: Pickle Bill Fact Sheet
Examples of pH for different foods (for selling home canned foods)


dill pickles (pH 2.6-3.8), tomatoes (pH 3.7-4.9), distilled water (pH 7), garlic (pH 5.3-6.3).

Beans cannot, say, be sold when canned from the kitchen because they are considered low acid food and it makes sense that the pickling solution for them is stronger than for cucumbers.

Good suggestions--now I've stretched my cucumber pickling brain as far as I ever hope to go.
The lemon-rosemary pickled green beans I make are 1:1 water to white wine vinegar. Do you use pickling vinegar or regular vinegar when you make pickles? What about brining them overnight in ice water (that's what I do with my Bread and Butter pickles).
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:42 PM   #29
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The lemon-rosemary pickled green beans I make are 1:1 water to white wine vinegar. Do you use pickling vinegar or regular vinegar when you make pickles? What about brining them overnight in ice water (that's what I do with my Bread and Butter pickles).
I am going to use cider vinegar checking the ph with the less dependable ph strips over an expensive ph meter--it needs to be a 5% acetic acid vinegar. A 5% acetic acid from my white vinegar will be the control vinegar.

I've never used white wine vinegar to make pickles, I bet it tastes good.

I'm going to brine the pickle chips in a very salty brine for 12 hours before I pickle them, to draw out moisture. I don't know if I'd brine green beans or not, I haven't thought about it.
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:50 PM   #30
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This is the recipe I use. I add pink peppercorns as well.

Lemon Rosemary Pickled Green Beans : Sides : Recipes | emerils.com

You can make them with waxed beans. I would not recommend pole beans or purple bush beans unless you want the brine to turn pink.

Wide-mouth jars make it easier to pack the jars.

I love these on a relish tray or as the "stir stick" in a Bloody Mary.
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