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Old 08-24-2016, 02:25 PM   #11
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In my opinion true dill pickles should not be made with vinegar. Not at all.
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:32 PM   #12
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In my opinion true dill pickles should not be made with vinegar. Not at all.
CharlieD is talking about fermented dill pickles, cucumbers which are put in a salt brine with dill/garlic/whatever, let ferment for weeks to months, basically curing the cucumbers in a lactic acid bath, which turns them sour, or half sour (depending on the amount of salt used) and keeps them crunchy. Those, are an amazing pickle and I love them too.
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Old 08-24-2016, 02:53 PM   #13
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Ive only made and seen commercially dill pickles using the dill fronds/ leaves until last year, when my son purchased a jar of Polish dill pickles from where he works, which had the dill flower head. I was excited, cause I never knew you could use that part of the dill, and coincidentally, my dill was in the process of going to seed at the time, so I had more than enough dill flowers to go around. Now I just use the dill in whatever stage it is in at the time Im making pickles. I do agree that the dill fronds due get kinda soggy, and stick to the pickle as you are taking it out of the jar ( kinda like how sea weed sticks to your leg when you go to the beach). I usually just take a bunch of dill, stick it at the bottom of the jar, and pack the cakes in after that. This keeps the dill at the bottom, so at least the first few pickles won't have anything stuck to it. Im usually the only one who eats the pickles at my house anyway, so I don't mind picking off the dill.
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Old 08-24-2016, 03:24 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
CharlieD is talking about fermented dill pickles, cucumbers which are put in a salt brine with dill/garlic/whatever, let ferment for weeks to months, basically curing the cucumbers in a lactic acid bath, which turns them sour, or half sour (depending on the amount of salt used) and keeps them crunchy. Those, are an amazing pickle and I love them too.
3 days, 3 days only.
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Old 08-25-2016, 02:50 AM   #15
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I make my dill pickles the way my Dad did: cure them in a crock in a cool place (our basement), then pack into jars and refrigerate. I have used loose seeds, seed heads, full stems with seeds, and fronds...and seeds. Since I move the pickles from the crock to a jar, I'm able to clean off anything sticking to the pickles. I then use a mesh colander to collect everything in the brine as I pour it into the jar to cover the pickles.

My family has never canned pickles to make them shelf-stable since we prefer the crunch of a fresh pickle. If you are making them right in a jar that you are putting in the bath, I would limit myself to just seeds in one form or another. Even the crock-and-refrigerate recipe I have uses just seed heads or seeds, but I like the extra touch of fresh dill when I can get it.
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:41 AM   #16
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In the United States, the vinegar intended for cleaning is 6% acetic acid, so it's not harmful to eat. Distilled white vinegar intended for food use is sold in the same section of the store as other vinegars, oils and condiments, so it's pretty obvious what to buy. Both - at least the ones from Heinz - are made the same way.

Horticultural vinegar (20-30%) is a different story. I don't believe it's available in grocery stores at all (not counting big-box stores that have a gardening section).
Ah, thanks for that, GG.
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:42 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by blissful View Post
CharlieD is talking about fermented dill pickles, cucumbers which are put in a salt brine with dill/garlic/whatever, let ferment for weeks to months, basically curing the cucumbers in a lactic acid bath, which turns them sour, or half sour (depending on the amount of salt used) and keeps them crunchy. Those, are an amazing pickle and I love them too.
Thanks, Blissful. I was about to ask.
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:49 AM   #18
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There was a little General Store in Wawa, Ontario that had a barrel of the pickles you are talking about. The BEST pickles EVER.
So can anyone tell me if the Brine I posted will work?? and what is Alum for?? I'm assuming it goes into the brine as it boils, and not into the jars.
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Old 08-25-2016, 11:48 AM   #19
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Debora,

There are two types of pickles. They differ in the recipe ingredients and they differ in the process.
Type 1: Old fashioned fermented pickles: cold water, salt, spices, days to weeks, fermenting, eaten fresh (not canned). These are crunchier. These are stored in the brine in a crock or food grade bucket, or in the refrigerator. These can be canned but they are usually not canned as they will lose their crunch.
Type 2: Pickled cucumbers: water, vinegar, salt, spice, alum, a brine poured over the cucumbers that are packed in jars, then water bath canned for a seal on the can. Can be made in one day.
Variation on 2: Sweet pickled cucumbers, same ingredients and sugar, the process is usually similar to the type 2. Some sweet pickles are processed in a sugar water bath for days prior to canning it it's brine.

If you want the fresh crunchy kind, that is Type 1.
If you are making Type 2, the alum goes in the brine, which is poured in the jars.
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Old 08-25-2016, 01:39 PM   #20
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Debora,

There are two types of pickles. They differ in the recipe ingredients and they differ in the process.
Type 1: Old fashioned fermented pickles: cold water, salt, spices, days to weeks, fermenting, eaten fresh (not canned). These are crunchier. These are stored in the brine in a crock or food grade bucket, or in the refrigerator. These can be canned but they are usually not canned as they will lose their crunch.
...
Though it is generally correct. I disagree with the statement "they are usually not canned as they will lose their crunch". My mother have been canning them for at least 30 years. They have never lost their crunch, never. The only reason she stopped, is because here in America she has two refrigerators, an unheard of luxury in Soviet Union, so she simply keeps the pickles in refrigerator. I only started pickling since I got married, last 20 + years and also keep pickles, pickled tomatoes, sauerkraut in refrigerator. But they absolutely can be canned, as the matter of fact I believe they are better canned.
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