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Old 07-17-2010, 10:09 AM   #51
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Whenever I visit one of the Rocky Mountain states, I buy a couple jars of huckleberry jam. Good stuff, but I have no idea what they are; the only 'huckleberry' I know is a dog.
Huckleberries look like small blueberries. Much sweeter and they are fantastic. Never had any until I moved to Montana, now I wait every year for the harvest.
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:11 AM   #52
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oh, then i really don't want to know what their huckleberries are.

they have funny ideas about oysters out there as well...
Only some of us have funny ideas about oysters...and I'm not one of them. But, if you get the chance at some huckleberries...TAKE it!
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Old 07-17-2010, 10:25 AM   #53
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woof!

gently please.
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Old 07-17-2010, 12:01 PM   #54
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Huckleberries

Huckleberries look and taste a lot like blueberries. My grandmother had them growing all over her property and we would pick them by the buckets. She used them just like blueberries. These were wild and my memory is that they were smaller than the typical blueberry. Also they seemed to have larger seeds and sometimes grew in more shaded areas. I remember the bushes were smallish in side and rather shrubby. We would find them in clusters of shrubs all over the place.

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Old 07-17-2010, 12:04 PM   #55
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Huckleberries look like small blueberries. Much sweeter and they are fantastic. Never had any until I moved to Montana, now I wait every year for the harvest.
They really are fantastic! I think blueberries pale by comparison...but...I can find blueberries here!
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Old 07-17-2010, 12:08 PM   #56
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Uh, maybe the huckleberry jam you buy was made in the western Washington area. When I was a kid, we would find red huckleberries in the woods near our house. These were OK to eat but really, really small. However, in the mountains you could find dark blue or purple huckleberries that grew wild. Lots of people made jam with these huckleberries and would go out of their way to find and pick them. The jam must have been good to go to all that effort. I used the huckleberries in buttermilk pancakes or muffins, and the results were exceptional.

Oh, and in western Washington there are real oysters.
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Old 07-18-2010, 05:48 PM   #57
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You welcome Kathleen.
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Old 07-18-2010, 07:17 PM   #58
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Back in the "good old days", my mom made wicked-good jelly & jam from both her own home-grown Concord grapes, & also from the wild Beach Plums that grew all over the Long Island waterfront back then. Fabulous stuff!

These days my favorites are farmers market Jalapeno Pepper jelly & Stonewall Kitchen's "Sour Cherry" preserves. Really tangy. But of course, when I have a craving for a peanut butter & jelly sandwich, it's good old Welch's grape jelly all the way! :)
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