"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-19-2017, 02:43 PM   #1
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,956
Flowers in the Jelly?

I've been looking over a recipe from Better Homes & G for Herb Jelly. They, of course, strain the liquid of the herbs once they have done the initial boiling. They then proceed in the normal way to canning the jelly.

I'm wondering if I can put a flower or leaf, depicting the contents, in the jar before the water bath? I was thinking of Mint Jelly or maybe trying to make some Sage Jelly, except what would I use a sweet Sage Jelly with? Chicken, pork, ravioli, cheese? What about Rosemary Jelly perhaps mixed with Mint for Lamb? Any suggestions?

Argh... just went away for about 40 min. to come back and see I had never press 'submit' - grrrr, dotty old dragn.

__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 04:07 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
medtran49's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Florida
Posts: 3,159
I have absolutely no idea whether this would be a problem or not, but the first thing I thought of was the botulism poisoning that people got from garlic packed in oil and canned several years back. I'm assuming you wouldn't want to sterilize the leaves or flowers, and they could potentially be contaminated and then would go into an anaerobic environment. You might want to do some research on including fresh herbs/flowers in jelly.

I'd also be worried about the fresh herbs/flowers turning a funky color or degrading over time.
__________________

__________________
medtran49 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 04:12 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 19,748
My Macedonian neighbors from my old house used to pick the leaves and flowers of the scented geraniums that I grew in pots in my backyard every year and put them in a jelly.

For the life of me I couldn't understand why as the geraniums were citronella scented, and the jelly she made with them tasted like a citrus cleaning solution, but they loved them. And never got sick as far as I know.

But, blech!
__________________
The next time someone asks what you did this past weekend, squint really hard and say, "Why, what did you hear?"
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 04:55 PM   #4
Head Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Montreal
Posts: 1,956
very good points and the very reasons I asked. But I was hoping to go along the lines of when you are actually adding the flowers/leaves you are adding them to the very hot jelly coming off the stove - being jarred and into the bath for *** minutes.

I realize buds and thick stems would not suit but flowers like borage? violets? hmmm, of course, canning is usually done in late summer and violets are from the spring. LOL guess I'd better check my calendar! I used to put borage flowers in ice cubes all the time - was always a big hit.

the small leaves of mint, not the heavier more mature ones. Also thinking now that rosemary might not be a good candidate.

thank you medtran - I will research some more and see what I can find out. May not even be this year although I really want to take advantage of the mint before it devours the country side.

LOL, bucky - they probably grew up with that and could assimilate any 'extra's' the jelly produced. cleaning solution, oh boy...
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 05:58 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,654
I think this is risky because botulism thrives in an anaerobic, low-acid environment, which is what jelly is. Also, when herbs flower, the leaves become bitter, so making a jelly with herbs that have flowered may not result in a good-tasting product. And I don't think the nice look of most flowers or herbs will survive the water-bath process.

Another way to go is to use the Jam Labelizer website, where you can make and print customized labels based on their templates. A few allow you to upload images to use on the label. Since I make a lot of homemade goods for gifts, I spent the $5US for complete access; otherwise, some designs are free and some are not.

https://www.jamlabelizer.com
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 06:13 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 19,748
The jelly my neighbors made wasn't bitter by any stretch (just disgusting - like citrus scented toilet bowl cleaner), and they would harvest later in the year when the plants were bolting
__________________
The next time someone asks what you did this past weekend, squint really hard and say, "Why, what did you hear?"
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 06:32 PM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,654
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
The jelly my neighbors made wasn't bitter by any stretch (just disgusting - like citrus scented toilet bowl cleaner), and they would harvest later in the year when the plants were bolting
Geraniums are not herbs. They're flowers.
__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 07:46 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 19,748
Do the leaves of flowers act differently than most other plants, such as herbs?
__________________
The next time someone asks what you did this past weekend, squint really hard and say, "Why, what did you hear?"
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 09:29 PM   #9
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 6,038
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I think this is risky because botulism thrives in an anaerobic, low-acid environment, which is what jelly is.
While this is true, for the most part, people sometimes tend to forget that sugar (along with salt) also has antibacterial properties. It's not that bacteria don't "like" sugar or salt. It's that these substances pull moisture out of cells and causes them to dehydrate through plasmolysis, making it extremely difficult for microorganisms to survive, let alone thrive.

According to Harvard Medical School...
"Some foods, such as jams and jellies, do not require a pressure cooker because their high sugar level makes it difficult for Clostridium botulinum bacteria to grow."

I remember my grandmother sealing jelly jars with nothing more than paraffin wax, and no water bath processing. Her jelly was shelf stable for years.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2017, 10:46 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 19,654
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
Do the leaves of flowers act differently than most other plants, such as herbs?
Have you ever tried eating the leaves of flowers? Do you see them in recipes?
__________________

__________________
The trouble with eating Italian food is that five or six days later you're hungry again. ~ George Miller
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.