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Old 03-12-2008, 12:48 PM   #11
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Thanks for this thread. I have a very lush herb garden just outside my kitchen (in the summer) and I have been looking for ways to preserve them for use in the winter. I am planning on getting a food dehydrator, but I'd love to store some fresh as well! Wanna see?
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Old 03-12-2008, 01:12 PM   #12
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B'sgirl beautiful herb garden..WOW..
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Old 03-12-2008, 11:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JillBurgh View Post
I pop my fresh herbs in the food processor with a little olive oil. Then I freeze 'em in cubes like GotGarlic. It's nice to add a burst of freshness to a dish at the end. Also freeze leftover tomato paste in cubes, and chicken stock.

Thanks for the tip about the water, PastaKing. That sounds like a better idea. Then I'm not committed to using the oil along with my herbs! Much better for soups & stews, I'd say.

Also, I like lemon verbena from the garden in my Iced Tea in the summer. You gave me an idea: This season, I'll freeze some in cubes to add to my tea all through the cold months, as well!
Don't thank me, thank Misty

About your lemon idea. It sounds great. However watch yourself whne you eat out. I saw a report that the lemon in your drink could make you sick. If the person who put that lemon in your drink did not have clean hands, you are drinking germs. Same thing with ice in water or soda. I always ask for no ice.
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Old 03-13-2008, 12:27 PM   #14
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Don't thank me, thank Misty

About your lemon idea. It sounds great. However watch yourself whne you eat out. I saw a report that the lemon in your drink could make you sick. If the person who put that lemon in your drink did not have clean hands, you are drinking germs. Same thing with ice in water or soda. I always ask for no ice.
Ok, thanks Misty!

I should point out that Lemon Verbena is not a "lemon," but an herb (seen below in a yummy looking granita). It is one of the most fragrant herbs, with a pungent, delicious lemon scent and flavor. It's terrific for flavoring drinks - and to chew on after a garlicky summer sausage poisons your breath at a backyard barbeque! I'm going to freeze some verbena leaves in water and some in tea to make cubes. As far as the lemons go, the safety thing is for another post or we'll get everyone on a tangent and get kicked out for good!

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Old 03-15-2008, 06:10 AM   #15
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cool! does that mean the basil that decided to grow like bean pole can be saved from the depth of floppy old dead leaves? woohoo

so what,
pick the leaves, puree them with a bit of oil and freeze?
or
puree them with a bit of water and freeze?

or test both cos u feel like testing and can? :)

or

just make some bruschetta and overdo the basil lol
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Old 03-15-2008, 06:12 AM   #16
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i think i have had too much coffee, going a bit zip zip zippppp
but do mean u just got a bag of water, put the herbs in and dumped it in the freezer?

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Old 03-16-2008, 11:18 AM   #17
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i think i have had too much coffee, going a bit zip zip zippppp
but do mean u just got a bag of water, put the herbs in and dumped it in the freezer?

I think that's what some people have done. I like to puree basil in water and freeze it in ice cube trays, so I can portion it out more easily. I don't see any benefit to using oil instead - it's more expensive, and it adds more oil and calories to whatever you end up using it in, which may not be what you want. I think using water is more versatile. HTH.
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Old 03-18-2008, 04:47 AM   #18
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thanks, actually if i use ice cubes would take up less space :)
don't know whats in there...but no space lol
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Old 09-25-2008, 10:36 AM   #19
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I grew herbs for the first time this year and froze chives, oregano and onion. To freeze chives, I grabbed a small handful and cut them up fine with scissors into a bowl, then filled ice cube trays 2/3 full. Fill with water just until they begin to float. I finally figured out to use a measuring spoon TBL to have good control and in most cases it takes about a TBL of water per cube. Freeze, then finish filling the trays so the ones that floated to the top will be encased in ice. Remove and store in freezer bags. Each ice cube contains 2-3 teaspoons of chives. Drop in soups or other dishes where a little extra water doesn't make a difference. For omelets or "no added water dishes", put the ice cube in a tea strainer and run water over it to melt the ice. Works great!

(I do put a small dish of baking soda in the freezer next to the trays to absorb odor. After I'm done, I soak the trays 1/2 full of full-strength white vinegar overnight, pour out the vinegar into a jar for use in cleaning, wash the trays, fill with water and make ice cubes and throw out the first batch. Not sure that's necessary but I didn't want to taste them to find out. Haven't had a problem with onion tasting ice even when there is still a trace of onion odor on the trays.)

For oregano, I picked off the leaves and spread them out in a single layer in a cake pan, froze them and put them in a pint jar in the freezer.

Raw onions are not my thing, but I like them cooked in food. Generally I use co-op dehydrated onions because they're easier, taste good to me (unlike store bought ones), and I don't have the mess every time I want a little bit and then either waste what's left over or smell up my refrigerator. Worse yet, I forgot I had them earlier this year and it took a while to find what was causing that awful smell in my home - rotten onions! Anyway someone gave me onions I didn't want to waste so I chopped them up, spread them out in a single layer in a pan and froze them, then put them in a jar in the freezer. Now when I'm cooking, I have onions ready to go without any fuss or mess.
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Old 09-25-2008, 10:48 AM   #20
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My oregano was frozen as whole leaves but I that was bothering me when I added them to my tomato sauce. You've given me the solution! Can't wait to try it.
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