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Old 08-09-2006, 10:31 AM   #1
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Freezing Potatoes

I have an abundance of baking potatoes. I am wondering how to "save" them from going bad sitting around by freezing them. Peel? Cut into different sizes say for hashbrowns, cubed for soups etc, and then blanch them? Is this the best I can do? And will they be watery when I get them out to use? Any better ways?

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Old 08-09-2006, 10:35 AM   #2
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If you have a cool dry place to store them, they'll do ok for quite a while. Colonial Americans used to store them in the 'root cellar' in sand from harvest through the winter. But, I guess there aren't a lot of root cellars in Marathon.

If your home is air conditioned, just keep them in a dark spot with some ventilation.
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Old 08-09-2006, 10:40 AM   #3
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I've had better success freezing stuffed baked potatoes than any other way of freezing them. Mashed will freeze if you don't make them too wet.
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Old 08-09-2006, 11:35 AM   #4
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iF YOU FREEZE FRESH POTATO, YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO USE THEM AFTERWORDS. eVEN A SLIGHT FROST BITE WILL MAKE POTATO SWEET AND IN MY OPINION (oops) unusable. Unless you cook them first and then freeze the only other way to save them, as it was mention above is a root cellar.
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Old 08-09-2006, 09:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete
I have an abundance of baking potatoes. I am wondering how to "save" them from going bad sitting around by freezing them. Peel? Cut into different sizes say for hashbrowns, cubed for soups etc, and then blanch them? Is this the best I can do? And will they be watery when I get them out to use? Any better ways?
we used to keep our potatoes in a paper sack in the outdoor shed. That was England, a slightly more temperate climate..
I wouldn't waste my freezer space for spuds, though, much as I adore them.Exchange them with the neighbours:
10 lbs spuds = 6 Farmers Cheeses, or 20 Dill pickles, or what ever!
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Old 08-09-2006, 09:30 PM   #6
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What Shunka said. You need to cook them and add a good bit of fat(butter) and milk and make 2X baked potatoes. And the mashed will freeze with the stabilizers of milk/fat. Otherwise, they get mealy when cooked and frozen.
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Old 08-09-2006, 09:34 PM   #7
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The water in the spud can render the thawd spud useless. The ice crystals are shards. the starch crystals are durable. Prep accordingly. Also it depends on the typ of potato, more starch, the better you are. We freeze bulk cubed hashbrowns all the time with fine end results. We use youkons. Buttery and creamy. i guees try out some variety for optimum performance.
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Old 08-10-2006, 12:01 AM   #8
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I agree - you can't freeze raw spuds if you expect anything edible. They need to be either cooked or par cooked (par boiled, par steamed, par fried).

This site has some spud specific info - worded differently here - and a hodge podge of here's the list of articles you can pick from to read - covers all things about freezing potatoes.
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Old 08-10-2006, 12:08 AM   #9
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I had the misfortune of having to discard 50 + meals recently because we had included little gourmet nadine potatos in the dish, skin on.
These meals were then frozen for a Meals on Wheels run my company does also.
It did not take long for the complaints to roll in. These wee tatties spat at you when pierced with a knife of fork. And aimed well by all accounts!!
My staff and myself tested them and concurred, so out they went. Now it must be the variety as I have had no problem with any others. I was amazed at the amount of water in the middle of each potato...
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Old 08-10-2006, 01:03 AM   #10
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CharlieD - yeah - pirogies!!! Solves all the problems!!!! Right???

Lynan - you bring up a point that I was just noticing ... it appears you have to peel your tatties unless your going to cut them them up before freezing.

I know that even mashers heated in a nuker (microwave) need to be given a stir halfway through because they will seperate ... or be really "nasty".
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