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Old 08-30-2012, 09:22 PM   #21
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I'm sorry, it's your cultural oversight to not realize that others who are Polish (as in that's where their passport is from) spell it differently. We are not being defensive, just pointing out that others are also correct.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:24 PM   #22
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I have two places to purchase my beef from. One is a huge steak house up on Route #1. Every day they get in shipments right from Chicago. The meat comes in with only the head missing. The animal is cut in half and it is up to the butchers there to cut it to the required cuts of meat. They also have Angus beef and range free meat. Get there too early in the morning and you either have to wait for the truck to come in or for the butcher to cut what you want right from the carcass. They do steak and beef business in the millions of dollars every year. You know the meat is fresh. You will never find those rolls of ground hamburg there. And none of it is ever frozen.

My second place is a little closer to home. They too are primarily a butcher shop. They have daily truck deliveries each day of carcasses hanging. What I love about that place is they have a large window and you can watch them cut your request while you wait. Some of their meats are frozen. They make their own sausages. They also sell some of their meats in marinade. I have my suspicions about that practice though.

At holiday time, 4th of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Labor Day and Memorial Day, you can't get in the door at either place. You have to take a number and wait your turn.

I have never been a fan of hamburg. But when I do have a need for it, I buy Angus and grind it myself. So much better than what I could buy at the store. It pays to have a dedicated butcher that you can trust.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:24 PM   #23
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there is no way in the polish dictionary that galumpkis is correct. if you can post a link or PM me a link to a polish dictionary that says otherwise, i'm happy to stand corrected.

i know my culture and how to spell gołąbki correctly.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:25 PM   #24
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Galloping Galumpkis

To end the discussion, and it seems that its hard to say anything these days without anyone getting offended, I would like to add my two cents worth.

I am Polish, and live in the Uk, and part of a huge Polish community. There is no way that Golabki as the previous poster said, are EVER called Galumpkis or anything BUT the correct word for them which is GOLABKI - (sorry dont have a Polish keyboard for the absolute correct spelling).

I couldnt imagine ever going anywhere that is Polish ie a polish restaurant here in London or even in Poland and ordering the aformentioned Galumpkis. I dont think anyone would understand what that was. And I wouldnt want to make a total prat of myself even trying!

Its obvious that as generations live and continue a very basic form of the old home native lang. bastardisations will occur, but that doesnt mean that this is their true and correct spelling of the word. If in doubt then please refer to google or an online polish dictionary!
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:34 PM   #25
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They were called holubky (Slavic spelling, I think) at my grandmother's house. She was German, so by all rights she should have called them kohlrouladen. But she could've called them oompah-loompahs, and it wouldn't have mattered. They were still delicious.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:38 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polish Cook View Post
To end the discussion, and it seems that its hard to say anything these days without anyone getting offended, I would like to add my two cents worth.

I am Polish, and live in the Uk, and part of a huge Polish community. There is no way that Golabki as the previous poster said, are EVER called Galumpkis or anything BUT the correct word for them which is GOLABKI - (sorry dont have a Polish keyboard for the absolute correct spelling).

I couldnt imagine ever going anywhere that is Polish ie a polish restaurant here in London or even in Poland and ordering the aformentioned Galumpkis. I dont think anyone would understand what that was. And I wouldnt want to make a total prat of myself even trying!

Its obvious that as generations live and continue a very basic form of the old home native lang. bastardisations will occur, but that doesnt mean that this is their true and correct spelling of the word. If in doubt then please refer to google or an online polish dictionary!
Language changes, even in the mother country. But, I don't think you have to worry about wandering into a Polish restaurant in London in the near future.
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:52 PM   #27
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Not to disagree, PF, but there are actually quite a few Polish restaurants in London. Strangely enough, my wife and I even ate at one that served American style barbeque (or was it barbecue?).
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:53 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PrincessFiona60 View Post
Language changes, even in the mother country. But, I don't think you have to worry about wandering into a Polish restaurant in London in the near future.
language does indeed change, however the basic construction of words and letters would take centuries upon centuries to shift so dramatically.

galumpkis is the anglicised version of traditional gołąbki. i agree you are referring to the same thing, and as steve kroll points out, they all taste just as delicious, no matter what the name!

however in this instance, there is no true polish word as galumpkis. i can put money on the fact that if you went to a polish restaurant, either here in australia where i am, anywhere in europe and especially in poland, if you asked for "galumpkis" you would receive a blank stare in return.

as for your last comment, i'm intrigued. what did you mean about not having to worry about wandering into a polish restaurant in london in the near future?
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:54 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
Not to disagree, PF, but there are actually quite a few Polish restaurants in London. Strangely enough, my wife and I even ate at one that served American style barbeque (or was it barbecue?).
this is indeed true! i visited london quite some time ago now, and we ate at a polish restaurant called posk. no idea if it's still there, but it was very very traditional and they served all the usual polish offerings: gołąbki, pierogi (not pierogies!), borscht etc.

princess fiona - do you do much polish cooking aside from gołąbki?
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Old 08-30-2012, 09:58 PM   #30
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I never said there weren't Polish restaurants in London...I said Polish Cook will not be wandering into one in the near future.
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