"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-01-2012, 05:36 AM   #41
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
By-the-way, I've always heard it pronounced gwa-loomp-kees. Doesn't mean it's right. My husband loves them, called halupkes in his family (Slovene and Slovak as opposed to Polish). I make it once a year and make it a huge batch and invite people over. I have an elderly friend with no teeth, and I make extra "juice" (her word, the tomato + stock I cook them in) and chop everything into a couple of containers of soup. I use a combination of my mom's, her best friends (who taught me to put some Polish sausage iin the "juice" for smoky flavor!), and my late mother-in-law (who taught me how to do the roll ups that I found so difficult).

I will say they don't take well to freezing then nuking. I've never noticed a problem with the ground meat, but the cabbage can become downright rubbery. If you must freeze (and I must), it is better to let them thaw at room temp, then slowly re-heat.

They are a favorite -- in my house and my neighborhood. Everyone loves them.
__________________

__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2012, 05:28 AM   #42
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 10
clare - I agree, I always make a huge batch of them and then obviously freeze some, and yes, when they come out of the freezer, I microwave them and if I keep them there for too long they kind of look 'burnt' but not! the cabbage kind of shrivels and doesnt look appetising at all, although still taste wonderful ... I had to laugh about the no teeth... have to remember to make lots of golabki when I'm old! I do agree the minced beef inside is very no teeth edible! lol!
__________________

__________________
Polish Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2012, 05:29 AM   #43
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 10
sorry mispelt your name - should write Claire!
__________________
Polish Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 06:06 AM   #44
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Galena, IL
Posts: 7,973
Don't worry about it. My family happens to be French-Canadian, hence the spelling. Clair is a French-man's name, but in whatever afterlife she's in, don't tell Claire Chenault's mom that. Clare, Klara. Don't think too much about it. I did take exception to a woman from Mississippi taking my one syllable name and stretching it to four! kah-lay-err-ah. it was so unrecognizable that she couldn't get my attention, and believe me, I've been call "krayer" by many Asian friends!

I agree with those who say that there is no right or wrong for what you call food from one country to the next. My MIL called them halupke and she spoke, I think, 4 languages. My mom called them pigs in a blanket. I always tell people my cooking is authentic to no one except the piece of ground where my kitchen happens to be at any given time.
__________________
Claire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 09:08 AM   #45
Executive Chef
 
justplainbill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Eastern Long Island, New York
Posts: 4,206
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
This is a dish of many different names. fillings wrapped in vegetable leaves were and ancient staple in many parts of the world. My Armenian ancestors wrapped cabbage leaves around lamb and rice and braised them. They also used grape leaves. We call them dolma and serve them with yogurt. The Greeks call them dolmades and serve them with a lemon sauce. The Jewish community called them holoshkis.

Golampkis (or whatever you call them) are all over Eastern Europe and beyond. They are popular because they were cheap eats for poor people.
Halušky (IPA: [ɦaluʃki], Slovak: haluška, Hungarian: galuska, Romanian: găluşcă, Ukrainian: галушка, Lithuanian: virtinukai) are a traditional variety of thick, soft noodles or dumplings cooked in the Central and Eastern European cuisines (Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine, Romania and Hungary). Halušky can refer to the lumps themselves or to the complete dish.
__________________
justplainbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 10:21 AM   #46
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
All this discussion about cabbage rolls...the ones I grew up eating (and still make) were the Swedish variation, got me curious about the history of cabbage rolls.

Cabbage roll - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls ( Comfort Food, History and Recipes) « Once Upon a Paradigm

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls Recipe Secrets

They are also an easy way to use cabbage, a crop that is easy to grow (one can only eat so much sauerkraut).

I freeze mine after they are stuffed. I pop the pan in the oven and cook about 90 minutes. I haven't noticed a deterioration in the flavor or texture of the meat. I typically use a combination of ground beef and ground pork, or just ground pork. Although, the past couple of years, I've taken to making cabbage-roll meatloaf or lazy day cabbage roll casserole. I actually like the meatloaf better than traditional cabbage rolls...and, I make cabbage-roll soup. I think cabbage rolls are either something you love or you hate.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 10:31 AM   #47
Wine Guy
 
Steve Kroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Twin Cities, Minnesota
Posts: 5,415
All this talk of cabbage rolls with mushroom sauce has me hungry. It was a childhood food for me. The only problem is that my wife despises both cabbage and mushrooms (I know - unbelievable, right? LOL). So my plan is to wait until next month when she goes off to the UK to work for a couple of weeks, at which time I'm going to prepare a large batch and freeze some. I'm going to try using the vacuum sealer.
__________________
Steve Kroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 10:35 AM   #48
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,393

Isn't the term stuffed cabbage rolls redundant?
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 10:52 AM   #49
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Yes, but I didn't write the titles...I just copied and pasted the links.
__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2012, 11:00 AM   #50
Chef Extraordinaire
 
CWS4322's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Rural Ottawa, Ontario
Posts: 12,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Kroll View Post
All this talk of cabbage rolls with mushroom sauce has me hungry. It was a childhood food for me. The only problem is that my wife despises both cabbage and mushrooms (I know - unbelievable, right? LOL). So my plan is to wait until next month when she goes off to the UK to work for a couple of weeks, at which time I'm going to prepare a large batch and freeze some. I'm going to try using the vacuum sealer.
Sounds like a plan, Steve. You should be able to get some fresh cabbage at the farmer's market (or maybe from my friend in Rochester). I find that the cabbage we grow is so much better to use than cabbage from the store.

We blanch and freeze cabbage heads. When I make the meatloaf, I thaw the head of cabbage overnight in the fridge (the heads were small), and then put a bit of sauce in the bottom, line the loaf pan with leaves, put some sauce in, put 1/3 of the meat mixture on top, some more cabbage, some sauce, more meat, more cabbage, more sauce, the remaining meat, cabbage, sauce, cover and bake for about 1-1/2 hours at 350. It has been a hit with us (I made it for the first time last year because I didn't have time to make the rolls, had the meat ready, and did this. We liked it so well, it became one of the standard Thursday evening [curling night] dishes that the DH put in the oven when he got to the farm so it would be ready when I got home). I used a tomato-based sauce (wonder why--haven't started cultivating mushrooms and we don't have a dairy cow). I would think this would freeze well after baking...haven't tried it, but think it would work.

For those who don't like cabbage, this works with Swiss Chard or spinach.
__________________

__________________
I've got OCD--Obsessive Chicken Disorder!
http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...les-76125.html
CWS4322 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cabbage

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.