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Old 05-31-2006, 03:30 AM   #11
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Sorry, no vinegar in my pickles.
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Old 05-31-2006, 12:13 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Nothing really.

I just would rather freeze foods than can them.

Well, Alix had stated that I never had to empty out a freezer that died, but I did. I any case, I shun canning, mainly because I don't have the space or the time to do it.

I'm not condeming anyone who does it or wants to do it. I just don't do it.


~Corey123.
Corey, I sense that I may have offended you with my comment. I am truly sorry, it was a tongue in cheek type comment meant to be amusing not to offend. Forgive me for any offense I caused please.

May I ask though, why you would choose to state that canning is inferior to freezing in a forum dedicated to the discussion of canning? You are certainly entitled to your opinion that freezing is superior to canning. Were you attempting to sway people's opinions or start a debate? I am not trying to get you upset, I am genuinely curious as to your motives with this thread, as the tone of your posts sounds defensive to me and I don't want anyone to be uncomfortable here.
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Old 05-31-2006, 12:44 PM   #13
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Except for vinegar-type pickled vegetables & jams/jellies, I agree 100% with Corey.

While I wholeheartedly agree "to each his own", the idea of canning vegetables leaves me cold. Not to mention reeling from the time involved. If there's an armageddon in my future, perhaps I'll feel differently, but until then - using fresh or preserving via freezing are the only methods I'll use.

The veggies I've frozen from my garden are alway fabulous when cooked later on in the year. It's difficult to tell them from fresh. I really don't think any canned vegetable product can compete with that.

But again, as I've said before, cooking/eating is a very personal thing, & if canning is something you enjoy both doing, as well as the end product, go to it!! (Safely, of course!!)

(Edited after rereading to sound less snarky - lol!!!)
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Old 05-31-2006, 09:15 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Corey, I sense that I may have offended you with my comment. I am truly sorry, it was a tongue in cheek type comment meant to be amusing not to offend. Forgive me for any offense I caused please.

May I ask though, why you would choose to state that canning is inferior to freezing in a forum dedicated to the discussion of canning? You are certainly entitled to your opinion that freezing is superior to canning. Were you attempting to sway people's opinions or start a debate? I am not trying to get you upset, I am genuinely curious as to your motives with this thread, as the tone of your posts sounds defensive to me and I don't want anyone to be uncomfortable here.


Not inferior. Just time-consuming. I have absolutely NOTHING AGAINST AMYONE
who chooses to can. I just don't do it. It's just a matter of personal preference.

No debate, just an honest opinion of myself. I'm also not trying to upset anyone else.

Thanks for the apology though.


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Old 05-31-2006, 10:45 PM   #15
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This forum is about "Canning and Preserving" food ... so discussions about any method of food preservation (canning, dehydration, cold smoking, salting, freezing, etc.) is on-topic in here. Although, I do find that a debate about one method being universally infinately superior to any and all others less than beneficial. Different foods are best preserved by different methods.

Corey - you appear to have some misconceptions about the canning process from a previous post ... (1) after sterilizing the jars and sanatizing the lids you do NOT cool them down to room temp before filling and processing - both are kept hot (about 180-F+) until filled and then placed back into hot water while filling the other jars, then processed (2) a vacuum is NOT created during processing in a boiling water or pressure canner - the vacuum is created as the jars cool after processing.
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Old 06-01-2006, 05:20 AM   #16
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I was always told that the vacuuming process is created during the time that the jars of food are sitting in the simmering water. I believe my mom and grandmother told me this.

And that the reason the lids aren't tightened all the way is so that the air that's in the jars can escape and be replaced by a clean airless vacuum seal,
preventing any spoilage. Then the screw bands can be tighten after the process.

Is the food that's placed in the jars hot also? Which might account for not letting the jars cool first.


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Old 06-01-2006, 06:18 AM   #17
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I have only a tiny freezer in my flat, and so have to think carefully about what to freeze, but do like to have stuff in the cupboards that I don't have to think too much about in an emergency or power cut. I wish I preserved more lol. Ideally I would have a small chest freezer but there is no room here. I used to not have a fridge either! For about 3 years ending about 5 years ago! (how did I cope?) I simply bought fresh as and when, and I had a larder. At that point I also had a range instead of a cooker. it was fun to live like that but I AM looking forward to having a house with room for a chest freezer and a HUGE cooker!
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Old 06-02-2006, 06:31 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
I was always told that the vacuuming process is created during the time that the jars of food are sitting in the simmering water. I believe my mom and grandmother told me this.

And that the reason the lids aren't tightened all the way is so that the air that's in the jars can escape and be replaced by a clean airless vacuum seal,
preventing any spoilage. Then the screw bands can be tighten after the process.

Is the food that's placed in the jars hot also? Which might account for not letting the jars cool first.
Answering backwards ... yes, the food is hot, or in the case of "raw pack" canning a hot liquid is poured over the contents. Then they are either processed in a boiling water or pressure canner.

Here is what is going on inside the jar to create the vacuum ... there is an amount of air left at the top of the jar called the head space. As the jars are processed the air inside the jars expands ... and some escapes under the lid (why you don't crank the lid on tight) and the air pressure inside the jar prevents water from seeping in. When you remove the jars from the canner and they begin to cool ... the sealing compound on the lids sticks to the rim of the jars sealing them and as the air and the contents inside the jar cools the air contracts ... which is what forms the vacuum.

Tightening the screw bands after processing is not a wise move - doing so can cause the vacuum seal to be compromised. Most texts advise you to remove the screw bands after processing and complete cooling. The screw bands are only necessary to keep the lid in place during processing.

If you want to get the feel of home canning, you can check out Home Canning website (this is by the people who make the canning jars and lids and publish the best book on how to get started canning - the Ball Blue Book) or if you want to look at the how to for all forms of food preservation then you might want to visit the National Center for Home Preservation which has all of the USDA currently accepted standards, methods, instructions, recipes, etc.
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Old 06-02-2006, 06:39 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lulu
I have only a tiny freezer in my flat, and so have to think carefully about what to freeze ...
Me too! I know how you feel.
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Old 06-02-2006, 09:57 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael in FtW
Answering backwards ... yes, the food is hot, or in the case of "raw pack" canning a hot liquid is poured over the contents. Then they are either processed in a boiling water or pressure canner.

Here is what is going on inside the jar to create the vacuum ... there is an amount of air left at the top of the jar called the head space. As the jars are processed the air inside the jars expands ... and some escapes under the lid (why you don't crank the lid on tight) and the air pressure inside the jar prevents water from seeping in. When you remove the jars from the canner and they begin to cool ... the sealing compound on the lids sticks to the rim of the jars sealing them and as the air and the contents inside the jar cools the air contracts ... which is what forms the vacuum.

Tightening the screw bands after processing is not a wise move - doing so can cause the vacuum seal to be compromised. Most texts advise you to remove the screw bands after processing and complete cooling. The screw bands are only necessary to keep the lid in place during processing.

If you want to get the feel of home canning, you can check out Home Canning website (this is by the people who make the canning jars and lids and publish the best book on how to get started canning - the Ball Blue Book) or if you want to look at the how to for all forms of food preservation then you might want to visit the National Center for Home Preservation which has all of the USDA currently accepted standards, methods, instructions, recipes, etc.


I think I got a few books on home canning. I remember doing it years ago when I moved into my very first apartment in the spring of '73.

And I DID have the Mason jars back then also, but they got lost or misplaced from moving so much.

And if the lids for those jars are damaged or bent in any way, or if the rubber seal is impaired they can't be used and should be tossed.


~Corey123.
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