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Old 05-30-2006, 05:25 PM   #1
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Thumbs up I'd Much Rather Freeze Foods Than Can Them.

Freezing your meats, fruits and veggies in your home freezer, to me, is a much more safer method of long-term storage than canning. I prefer THIS method over bothersome and time-consuming canning.

With canning, everything the prepared food touches has to be clinically sterilized. Inside and out. That is, everything must be boiled in water at a temperature of 212 degrees to kill bacteria and germs! The Mason jars, lids, rims, utensils, EVERYTHING. Then you must let them cool in a draft-free place away from insects, dust and other impurities which might otherwise
contaminate the jars and lids.

Then after the food is placed in the jars and sealed, the jars of food themselves must also be placed and submerged in water inside a large canning pot or pressure canner, brought to the boiling point and allowed to simmer for a specified amount of time until the lids are slightly dented inward, giving the indication that the jars of food are properly sealed and are then safe to keep on the in the cupboard after being allowed to cool down.

But look at all the trouble it takes to get there! And if the slightest thing should go wrong, you could end up with spoiled food and botulism!

With freezing, all you have to do is merely blanch your fruits and veggies. And along with your meats, you just need a good quality vacuum bag sealer to keep damaging air out and you can keep foods in your freezer almost indefinitely!!

As long as your freezer is able hold and maintain true 0-degree cold, you'll never have to worry abouut food spoilage. Ever!!

This method, to me, makes the most sense out of the two. I used to can foods years ago, especially homemade Boston baked beans, but freezing them is far more faster and safer, I think.


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Old 05-30-2006, 05:29 PM   #2
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You have obviously never had to clean out a freezer that has died.

I don't mean that as a slam, but I am going to point out that one of the reasons canning was invented was because there was no refrigeration. I, for one, think it is a wonderful idea to have home canned goods available in the event of a power outage that may last a few days. I'm not going to be keen on using things that are partially thawed, but will have no qualms about using my canned goods. Just as another point, canning is preferable to freezing in terms of preparedness for a Pandemic situation. (where is that thread anyway?)
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Old 05-30-2006, 05:52 PM   #3
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Corey:

Both methods have their pros and cons. Canning, as Alix said, was the only choice for many years. I choose to freeze rather than can but I don't have a problem with canning. Some folks can so much stuff that you'd need a room full of freezers to hold it all (rather than some shelves in the basement). Then there's the electric bill...
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Old 05-30-2006, 05:56 PM   #4
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Interesting idea, unfortunatelly doesn't work for pickles, or pickled tomatoes or for million other things that cannot be frozen. Though I too like to freeze things, do it all the time. It just one doesn't substitude for another.
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
You have obviously never had to clean out a freezer that has died.

I don't mean that as a slam, but I am going to point out that one of the reasons canning was invented was because there was no refrigeration. I, for one, think it is a wonderful idea to have home canned goods available in the event of a power outage that may last a few days. I'm not going to be keen on using things that are partially thawed, but will have no qualms about using my canned goods. Just as another point, canning is preferable to freezing in terms of preparedness for a Pandemic situation. (where is that thread anyway?)


Umm; As a matter of fact, yes I did. Three times in my life!

The first one that I ever bought, a Wellbuilt freezer, had quit on me. The compressor was the culprit. I knew that it was going bad because it made a weird strange noise. It was fixed though since it was still under warrenty at the time.

The second one which was a General Electric upright, had also quit on me. Same thing, the compressor went south. Had to get another one before the food spioled.

The third one, another Wellbuit model, didn't die. My ex-roomate had mistakingly unplugged it and he didn't realise it until almost about a week or so later!
It was obviously too late them, as all of the food that was stored in it had spoiled.

We emptied the thing and put it on the back porch to air out for a few days.
I then washed it with a bleach and detergent water solution, hoping to kill the smell, but it NEVER went away because it became embedded in the walls!

I still used it, but it had to be replaced because it reeked havok with that bad smell - like someone died in it!! I then bought a small 5.3 cubic foot chest freezer which I still have and use now.

Yes, I'm well aware that canning foods was the only method of preservation for long-term storage before refrigeration was invented. I'm not doubting that. I just like freezing over canning.

Yeah, well I didn't think pickles could be frozen either. I'm talking mainly meast, fruits, veggies and some cooked foods as well, such as spaghetti sauce and cooked meat.

When making spaghetti sauce, I usually double the batch so that the next time I
want the sauce for something, well, there it is.


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Old 05-30-2006, 06:52 PM   #6
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So, Corey, what's your point?
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Old 05-30-2006, 07:02 PM   #7
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Nothing really.

I just would rather freeze foods than can them.

Well, Alix had stated that I never had to empty out a freezer that died, but I did. I any case, I shun canning, mainly because I don't have the space or the time to do it.

I'm not condeming anyone who does it or wants to do it. I just don't do it.


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Old 05-30-2006, 07:27 PM   #8
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THIS post brings back memories...
When I was a teen,I use to help my
Grandma(she is passed on) can and "put" up veggies,
she had her own garden, I helped her in all aspects of
gardening & "canning" we did it all,
from actual jar canning to putting up in the fridge, she mainly frooze
corn, peas,beans,okra,squash.... every thing else she would jar.
I loved to eat it all,she was such a good cook,thanks for the thread to help me remember my loved one :)
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Old 05-30-2006, 08:59 PM   #9
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Thank you!

I'm so sorry to hear that your dear grandmother has passed on. Please accept my most sincere condolences. You must have been proud of the things that she taught you in canning and freezing.

Yeah, that's what they called it- "puuting up" food for the winter. My grandmother on my mom's side had a freezer. She always kept it full though.

Not to get off topic, but I learned some of the things about outdoor cooking from my dear late brother, like how to deep fry a turkey. He was always one to eagerly cook outdoors.

He earned the nickname Grillmaster for his ambitious undying love for outdoor cooking on the grill. He didn't bake much, but he sure knew how to throw down on a good home-cooked BBQ!!! I truly miss him!! There was no one else like him on the face of the earth!
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Old 05-31-2006, 01:15 AM   #10
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These are pretty good "freezer" pickles:

Mix 2 quarts sliced cucumbers with skins on,
2 large sliced onions,
and 2 Tablespoons salt

Let stand for 2 hours then drain

add 1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 cup vinegar

mix well and put in freezer bags.

They are like a bread and butter pickle.

Hope you enjoy!
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