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Old 05-14-2009, 06:35 AM   #1
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Question ISO advice/info on Pressure Canners

I was wondering of your thoughts on something. I am looking for a good pressure canner and in the reviews there appears to be pros and cons of having either a gauge or the jigglier. Which one do you like and why? At first I thought the gauge was best because it is on all the more expensive models...

Michael

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Old 05-14-2009, 07:42 AM   #2
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I have only used the pressure gauge pressure canners. I pressure can food items at different pressures. Some I can at 11 pounds pressure and some at 15 pounds of pressure. With the gauge, I can tell what pressure I have achieved.
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Old 05-14-2009, 08:29 AM   #3
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I second what Beth said. :)
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Old 05-14-2009, 12:30 PM   #4
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I am feeling disagreeable today.

I have the jiggler kind, and I like it because you choose the appropriate pressure (5, 10, 15 pounds), turn the heat on, and listen for the rattle. No danger of pressure going too high, no need to keep your eyes on a gauge constantly. (I am assuming that you have to do that--I don't know, because I have never used a gauge.)

Gauges also should be checked every year before you start canning, to be sure they are accurate. We used to do that here in the Extension office, but the tester broke and a new one is beyond our budget.
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Old 05-14-2009, 06:53 PM   #5
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Unless you live at 2,000 feet or higher you will find the 'jiggler' pressure canner far easier and more practical to use, especially since you don't have to watch it every minute. The rocking motion of the weight maintains the pressure for you.

Dial gauge canners require that your gauge be tested before you use it the first time and annually thereafter. If you are not near a location where testing is possible you have a problem. Not having it tested is very dangerous since the gauge could be as much as 4 lbs off and setting you up for a poisoning.

Pressure canning is done at 10# for rockers, 11# for dial gauges, at sea level and the ONLY time a different pressure is use is for higher altitude adjustments. Nothing is gained by using a higher pressure other than over processing the nutrients out of the foods.

If in doubt go to the source, the National Center for Home Food Preservation
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:09 PM   #6
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Question

Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
I am feeling disagreeable today.

cool. I feel disagreeable mostly every day.

anyway, I'm glad I saw this because I am going to start
canning this summer and I have never done it. I was actually
going to post the same question! do you feel that is the best
canner for a beginner? my father used to can when I was a kid
and he had the jiggler cooker. I seriously didn't think there was
a choice - I figured that the jiggler kind wasn't made anymore!
shows how much I know. and what brand/size is the best?
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:23 PM   #7
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[quote=ellakav;821091]
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
I am feeling disagreeable today.

quote]


cool. I feel disagreeable mostly every day.

anyway, I'm glad I saw this because I am going to start
canning this summer and I have never done it. I was actually
going to post the same question! do you feel that is the best
canner for a beginner? my father used to can when I was a kid
and he had the jiggler cooker. I seriously didn't think there was
a choice - I figured that the jiggler kind wasn't made anymore!
shows how much I know. and what brand/size is the best?
I'd say that would depend on you and your needs.Not all are the same.Some are far more expensive then others.Some are larger/smaller

I've been very happy with my presto 23 qt.It gets the job done without all the hassle.
National Presto Industries, Inc.

The All American CanningUSA.COM Home Canning Supplies Store: your resouce for home canning supplies

See what I mean...?

Munky.
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:24 PM   #8
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Unless you plan on doing some really serious quantities, the smaller 16-quart Presto pressure canners sold at your local Wal-Mart stores are sufficient and within most budgets (under $70). They will hold up to 7 quart jars at a time or about 9 pint jars.

Walmart.com: Presto 16-Qt. Pressure Canner: Kitchen & Dining

Make sure too that you have the height on your stove for the canner to fit and that has the type of heating elements compatible for canners.
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post

Pressure canning is done at 10# for rockers, 11# for dial gauges, at sea level and the ONLY time a different pressure is use is for higher altitude adjustments. Nothing is gained by using a higher pressure other than over processing the nutrients out of the foods.

If in doubt go to the source, the National Center for Home Food Preservation

Something is gained; time is saved. Something I can I bring up to 15 pounds pressure and then shut off the heat. I could can it at 11 pounds, but that would take more time and fuel.

I used to duly have my pressure lid checked at the extension office; My pressure lid always tested correct.
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Old 05-14-2009, 07:47 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
Something is gained;time is saved. Something I can I bring up to 15 pounds pressure and then shut off the heat. I could can it at 11 pounds, but that would take more time and fuel.
Tell your extension office that you are doing that and see what they say. Not safe at all.....as is no longer having your gauge checked annually. There is a reason why it is done "annually" even though it was accurate in the past. Things sometimes change with use.

BTW, bacteria spores, especially C. Botulinum, are killed by a sustained maintenance of a temperature over 240F for a specific time, not just reaching a high temperature and gradually allowing it to cool down.
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