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Old 06-25-2006, 12:06 AM   #11
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I actually had a reason for asking, Corey - my Aunt tried this with miserable results. One problem was that the recipe wasn't designed for her particular bread machine - and the other was that she was not using the pectin called for in the recipe. After we got that worked out ... it still failed because either she, or the recipe, didn't take into account the variability of natural pectin in the fruit (slightly under-ripe vs fully ripe). One time it came out like a really thick syrup - another time it was like a rock - and the 3rd time it came out just right - but didn't a couple of times after that.

I KNOW her Mama didn't teach her to make jam that way!
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Old 06-25-2006, 07:07 AM   #12
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Her mama probably didn't have the bread machine either.

My mom used to make jellies and jams the tradirional way, which required being in the kitchen all day! That was way too time-consuming!


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Old 06-26-2006, 03:04 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
Her mama probably didn't have the bread machine either.

My mom used to make jellies and jams the tradirional way, which required being in the kitchen all day! That was wat too time-consuming!
Yep - and Grandma never had a failed batch of jam, either!

Sometimes, regardless of how many gadgets and gizmos you have in your kitchen - the key ingredient to success is time, attention, and a little love for what you are doing.

If you want no muss, no fuss jam ... there is always a jar of Smuckers on the grocery store shelves.
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Old 06-26-2006, 05:18 AM   #14
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I bought that.


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Old 06-26-2006, 08:02 AM   #15
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What requires you to be in the kitchen all day to make jam or jelly. You boil your berries to get juice or you puree your fruit in blender to make jam. You either add sugar and boil to the jel state (maybe 10 minutes) or you add pectin bring it to a boil for a minute, and put in jars. Put on lids, invert and you are done. There is no need to use a water bath for jams and jellies for home consumption. The high heat and high sugar concentration are preservatives.
Making in a bread machine is a "gimmick" in my opinion. It would have to take longer and how I would ever pour out of my (ex) bread machine I would not have any idea.
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Old 06-27-2006, 01:12 AM   #16
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Making a batch of jam or jellies over years has averaged about 30 minutes
from start to finish. this ladies mom might be making more the one batch. I know that was the case with my mother she never made just one batch. i use the hot pack system and it works great for me.
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Old 08-03-2006, 10:15 PM   #17
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jam not gelling

First time participant! I'm trying to make Blueberry Jam and it's not "jamming"! I've followed the "Ball" recipe adding 9 cups of crushed berries to 6 cups of sugar. It's been boiling for abou 15 minutes which seems to be long enough but it's not thickening. I even had lemon juice as another site recommended with no difference. Can I call it quits for the night and add sure gel tomorrow?
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Old 08-03-2006, 10:29 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louise C
First time participant! I'm trying to make Blueberry Jam and it's not "jamming"! I've followed the "Ball" recipe adding 9 cups of crushed berries to 6 cups of sugar. It's been boiling for abou 15 minutes which seems to be long enough but it's not thickening. I even had lemon juice as another site recommended with no difference. Can I call it quits for the night and add sure gel tomorrow?
I've just prepared 8 different jams for a client. 750 gms of mixed fruit,or strawberry, or blackberry. I blended the fresh fruit first ( the client wanted "smooth" jam) and then added sugar in about the same proportions as your recipe. I brought the liquid to a boil then boiled for 20 minutes, stirring frequently, because if you burn them, you get a nasty smoky flavour!
I then let the jams cool for 20 minutes, added 2.5 tsps of powdered pectin ( liquid isn't available here), mixed it in, brought back to the boil, boiled for 2 minutes, turned off, bottled immediately and water bath for 15 minutes.
When I tried the samples this morning, they were perfect. Only the last lot (which had an outrageous amount of water added, so I upped the pectin to 4 tsps) was a little more liquid.

Remember, too, that jam is always firmer the following day.
Try the saucer test; if it barely runs, like lava flow, it's fine!
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Old 08-03-2006, 11:04 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louise C
First time participant! I'm trying to make Blueberry Jam and it's not "jamming"! I've followed the "Ball" recipe adding 9 cups of crushed berries to 6 cups of sugar. It's been boiling for abou 15 minutes which seems to be long enough but it's not thickening. I even had lemon juice as another site recommended with no difference. Can I call it quits for the night and add sure gel tomorrow?
A timing for jelling is not realistic. It has to cook until it is done. It depends on the amount of pectin present. It will "jell" when it is the right time. You need to keep cooking it until it does. You can probably begin again tomorrow. I don't think you can now add Sure Jell
cook your mixture until when you put a spoon into the mixture and tip it back, the fruit on the spoon DOESN't come off in driplets but instead begins to gather on the edge of the spoon and come off in a "sheet"--the driplets come together. At that point you can put it in jars. It may take an entire day to entirely "set" to form jelly/jam.
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Old 08-04-2006, 03:02 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Louise C
First time participant! I'm trying to make Blueberry Jam and it's not "jamming"! I've followed the "Ball" recipe adding 9 cups of crushed berries to 6 cups of sugar. It's been boiling for abou 15 minutes which seems to be long enough but it's not thickening. I even had lemon juice as another site recommended with no difference. Can I call it quits for the night and add sure gel tomorrow?
Like Gretchen said - the "time" given in a recipe is only an estimate of the general minimum of how long it might take to cook. The only way to know if it is done is by (1) Temp, as a first indicator that you're getting close and (2) checking to make sure it sheets off a spoon (I also do the freezer plate thing when I think I'm gellin' to double check). This is all explained in your Ball book.

I once didn't cook my marmalade long enough (and my son did the same thing) - we added pectin and wound up with rocks of stuff in the jars that would beak a knife ....

Ok - back to your problem ... it doesn't sound like to tried to can it - it just didn't thick and you stuck the whole pot in the refrigerator overnight? If so ... carefully reheat it and cook to the jelling stage it one option ...
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