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Old 06-30-2008, 02:33 PM   #1
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Just made some jam for the first time.

Over the weeknd I went over to my aunts house (and her huge kitchen) to make some jam. I originally wanted to make it from cherries but I decided I didn't want to sit there and pit them all day. So instead I used peaches.So finshed chopping the peaches and then realized i didn't have enough. So in went some strawberries. Added some sugar, lemon juice, and Sure Jell and out came strawberry jam! All I did was follow the recipe that came with Sure Jell and it came out alright. And My family had a lot of fun helping me. Its a fun project for family and friends to come over. There were two recipies on there so it was a little confusing. One was called the traditional and the other had something to do with cheesecloth. Anybody know the differnece? Anybody else have successful "jam sessions" lately?

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Old 06-30-2008, 02:35 PM   #2
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I love jam making.

By straining through cheese cloth you get a jelly.

a marriage made in heaven if you have peaches again is peaches and raspberries. I make some of that every summer ;)
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Old 06-30-2008, 03:42 PM   #3
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I want to start making jams and jellies and other preserved foods. I bought a cookbook on preserving foods .. hopefully I'll be getting some peaches this weekend from Fredericksburg Tx. We're going to drive there Sunday.
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Old 06-30-2008, 05:36 PM   #4
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Cheries with lemon slices is my all tyme absolute favorite jam. i can just seat and eat it out of the jar, yum.
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Old 06-30-2008, 05:54 PM   #5
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Another great way to make jam is to make freezer jam. The flavor is closer to the natural flavor of the fruit as it isn't cooked. But it also doesn't have the staying power of a cooked jam or jelly. And, it has to be kept in the freezer until used.

My favorite jelly took a ton of work. I had picked a couple gallons of wild raspberries. I wanted a beautiful jelly, and so mixed the berries and some sugar together, according to recipe directions, and put them into my spaetzla maker/ricer, which was covered on the bottom with several layers of cheesecloth. I proceeded to squeese the berry/sugar mixture through. It made an incredible jelly, but took hours of hand pressing. My arms were so tired after that experiment. I got several quarts of beautiful jelly from that batch, but have been leary of taking on such a task again. If I can scare up enough berries this year, I'm hoing to process them through my juicer to make the jelly seed free, but with a bit of pulp.

The moral of this story is to use whatever work-saving appliances you own, but only if it will give you the highest quality end result. If the juicer somehow reduces the quality of my jelly, I will try something else.

Seeeeeeeya; Goodweed of the North
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Old 07-01-2008, 12:55 PM   #6
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After I was done making the jam I had given my aunt and uncle a jar of it, after all there was so much of it I couldn't possibly use all of it. I could not believe how happy they were to accept it. I would imagine giving homemade jam or jelly is a big hit with people from my experience. Has anybody here ever given away their jam or jelly as a gift? What kind of reactions do you get?
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Old 07-01-2008, 01:15 PM   #7
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Last week I made jam with apricots and raspberries. I think I would strain the raspberries next time to make a prettier jam.

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Old 07-01-2008, 02:40 PM   #8
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[quote=Prosciutto;637897]After I was done making the jam I had given my aunt and uncle a jar of it, after all there was so much of it I couldn't possibly use all of it. I could not believe how happy they were to accept
Yes, I give away jams, jellys, fruit cheese and other things from my kitchen every chistmas and whenever oppertunity arises. I get a great reaction. In fact, I baked a cake for a recent birthday of a close neighbours fancy birthday party and she's got me lots of commisions to cook for them, so I'm very happy to recommend giving jams etc as presents, it might one day make you a little income, and in the mean time it will make he people getting it very happy!
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Old 07-01-2008, 05:22 PM   #9
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MmaryJean; That jam looks soooooo good. It has gorgous color. Yes, seedless is amazing stuff, and the seeds don't get caught in your teeth. But you said you'd strain it to make it prettier. I say that your pictured jam is some of the prettiest product I've seen in a long time. And it's got my mouth watering.
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Old 07-02-2008, 01:50 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosciutto View Post
After I was done making the jam I had given my aunt and uncle a jar of it, after all there was so much of it I couldn't possibly use all of it. I could not believe how happy they were to accept it. I would imagine giving homemade jam or jelly is a big hit with people from my experience. Has anybody here ever given away their jam or jelly as a gift? What kind of reactions do you get?
People recognize that properly home-canned items like jam, jelly, preserves, marmalade, butters, etc. are a special gift involving not only the costs of the ingredients but also your time and effort.

Each year, for Christmas, I make a variety - Pop likes apple butter, Mom likes orange marmalade, one aunt like peach jam, my other aunt like apricot preserves, and my sister likes anything she doesn't have to cook. I make them each a basket with each - one of each but two of their favorites, and a loaf of homemade honey-butter wheat bread ... along with a jar of each for them to share for the week Mom and Pop are here (and a couple of extra loaves of bread and a couple of loaves of cinnamon bread).

I usually get calls from them starting in the summer wanting to know if I am going to make my jams for Christmas ...
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