"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-15-2009, 12:18 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 25
Looking for a good pressure cooker..are they all the same?

We are planing a winter garden but we need to get a good pressure cooker...can I get by with a used one? Guage or weighted pressure adjustments...I notice that most do not hve a guage...is this important/

Thanks,
Doug

__________________

__________________
doug_k48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2009, 01:00 PM   #2
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
Are you wanting a Pressure "cooker" for cooking food quicker or a Pressure "Canner" for pasteurizing (canning) food jars for long-term pantry storage? They are NOT the same thing.

A Pressure Canner with a dial gauge is for the sophisticated canner but it does require that you get the dial gauge checked for accuracy BEFORE you use it the first time and at the beginning of each canning season. Most of us no longer live in farming communities or near local Extensions that offer the testing so a "rocker gauge" pressure canner is more popular. You can also purchase conversions from a dial to rocker gauge for some brands, like Presto.

An inexpensive (under $70) rocker gauge pressure canner is the Presto 16-qt and can be found in most Wal-Marts, Ace Hardware, or similar stores that sell canning supplies. The expensive canners are the All-American and these get passed down in a family for generations.

Pressure Canners are used ONLY for processing low-acid foods (meat, vegetables). For high-acid foods (jams, jellies, pickled items) you use a Boiling Water Canner, which is nothing more than a big stock pot with a rack to boil jars in.

Rocker gauges have three (3) weight settings (5#, 10#, 15#). The 10# is the standard for modern canning and the 15# for higher altitudes.
__________________

__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2009, 10:55 AM   #3
Head Chef
 
sparrowgrass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Highest point in Missouri
Posts: 1,794
Check out Amazon.com--they often have canners in their Friday sale or in the outlet store, for good prices.
__________________
I just haven't been the same
since that house fell on my sister.
sparrowgrass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2009, 02:02 PM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnerd View Post
Are you wanting a Pressure "cooker" for cooking food quicker or a Pressure "Canner" for pasteurizing (canning) food jars for long-term pantry storage? They are NOT the same thing.

A Pressure Canner with a dial gauge is for the sophisticated canner but it does require that you get the dial gauge checked for accuracy BEFORE you use it the first time and at the beginning of each canning season. Most of us no longer live in farming communities or near local Extensions that offer the testing so a "rocker gauge" pressure canner is more popular. You can also purchase conversions from a dial to rocker gauge for some brands, like Presto.

An inexpensive (under $70) rocker gauge pressure canner is the Presto 16-qt and can be found in most Wal-Marts, Ace Hardware, or similar stores that sell canning supplies. The expensive canners are the All-American and these get passed down in a family for generations.

Pressure Canners are used ONLY for processing low-acid foods (meat, vegetables). For high-acid foods (jams, jellies, pickled items) you use a Boiling Water Canner, which is nothing more than a big stock pot with a rack to boil jars in.

Rocker gauges have three (3) weight settings (5#, 10#, 15#). The 10# is the standard for modern canning and the 15# for higher altitudes.
Good info here...thank you!
__________________
doug_k48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-16-2009, 02:03 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Check out Amazon.com--they often have canners in their Friday sale or in the outlet store, for good prices.
I have also been looking on craigslist and of course at our local garage sales but they are hard to come by out here in CA...back east would be a diffrent story.

Thanks
__________________
doug_k48 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-01-2009, 03:41 PM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 16
My mother in law gave me an old Presto with the 'rocker' gauge. She had it in the 60's and the first thing I did after giving it a good cleaning was to replace the gasket which is a common size and easily available. If you find one used, I would reccommend ordering a gasket asap.
This older one will hold 6 quarts easily and 8 pints or half pints. I have a small pressure cooker which per the instructions says it can double as a pressure canner but I have never used it this way. It would only hold maybe 3 quarts at one time and would be useless for canning big batches.

If I were in the market for a new one, I wouldn't go cheap and $70 is too cheap. I would go for a heavier gauge for around $100.
__________________
sallynilly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2009, 11:33 PM   #7
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Canberra, Australia - The Nations Capitol and Home of the Pollies
Posts: 61
Hopefully you will have found yourself a canner that suits your needs but if you haven't you may like to check out this review on American Pressure Canners.

Best Pressure Canners: All American Pressure Canner Cooker Review
__________________
Jenyfari

Cookware Consumer Guide
Jenyfari is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 04:06 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
SugarMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: *~*MA*~*
Posts: 10
Mcnerd- great information !!!! My Mom used to can, sadly none of it was able to be passed down. I've been wanting to can for ages, just so unsure of where to start.

Doug- don't count on finding them in the east at tag sales- I've been tagging my whole life and never found a single one !
__________________
*~*Shannyn*~*
Daily Family Chef
Wife of Mama of
Lover of all things cooking and baking....well, except maybe clean up
SugarMama is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2010, 04:54 PM   #9
Head Chef
 
mcnerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Southern California
Posts: 1,326
Canning methods changed heavily in the last 20 years, so you did not miss out on anything. Best you learn from the beginning with modern equipment and instructions. Canning is fun and easy, but just demands a big of respect to be safe (from poisoning yourself).
__________________

__________________
Support bacteria. It's the only culture some people have.
mcnerd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.