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Old 08-17-2006, 04:27 PM   #1
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Pickle Help

HI I am looking for help
I made some kosher dills and followed the recipe out of the Ball Blue book. I used the freshest stuff I could get.. The pickles, garlic and dill all came from my garden picked and used within an hour of harvest but my pickles still came out soft and wrinkled.. I measured all the ingredient carefully used canning salt. But I don't know what happened.

The second batch I used the same stuff and also put in the Ball pickle crisp and the same things happened..

I processed in a water bath. After putting in the jars the bath came up to a boil in about 6 minutes and I processed for 10.

Thanks for any help you can give..

Bill

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Old 08-17-2006, 04:36 PM   #2
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You need to cut off the blossom end for one thing. And they may crisp up. It is too soon to eat them--if you have just made them.
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Old 08-18-2006, 04:55 PM   #3
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One problem, as Gretchen noted, could be the failure to cut off the blossom end (that's the end away from the stem). Another problem could be the type, age or size of cucumber you used. And - then again as Gretchen mentioned - these are not ready to eat in a couple of days ... they need to cure for 4-6 WEEKS! if you are talking about the Kosher style dills in the Ball Blue Book (page 46). Oh, yeah - if you HAD followed the recipe - you would have processed your pickles for 15-minutes, not 10. If you don't want to wait - there are some other "quick pickle" recipes you might try ... you still have to wait, but not as long.

Of course ... you really should read the entire section on pickles ... for example ... on page 42 - in the first part of "Getting Started" it tells you that "to reduce the loss of cripsness" ... you bring your water canner to a full boil before adding the pickles ... well, I'll let your read the rest of the instructions yourself since you have "The Book".

The National Center for Home Food Preservation has a good Pickle site
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Old 08-18-2006, 07:50 PM   #4
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Just to share a few hilarious (and disastrous) moments about pickle-making...
I decided about a year or so ago that I wanted some of those delicious, slightly sweet, mostly sour pickles available, it would seem, ONLY in the USA.
So I investigated methodically. I went to all the Supermarkets that have imported produce, bought loads of different pickles, ate them all ( that was the easy bit) and then narrowed it down to something vaguely "Polish". I already make Dill Pickles, so I wanted something a little different.

I looked up 30 different recipes for "Polish", "Sweet & Sour", "Sweet", "Sour", "Czech", "Byelorussian", etc. pickles. I settled on six different options, which I spent a week preparing.

So then comes the "testing" stage YUM! YUM!

( I'm looking at my test notes as I write this - the notes are edited to avoid
censorship!!!!)

No. 1: Tasteless. No salt, no sugar,no taste, nothing.
No. 2: Yuk! Disgustingly wrinkled texture, taste like a mouthful of sea water with seaweed.
No. 3: Could be. Far too much spice, however, and toooo sweet.
No. 4: Wrinkled. Very salty. Too soft.
No. 5: Crispy, at last. A little more salt would help, as would a little more acid. Over spiced with allspice and cloves.
No. 6: These were truly appalling. Whoever posted this recipe in the internet must have been drunk.



so I finally decided on No. 3; modified the spice ( far too much allspice and cloves, again) added more vinegar and less sugar and more salt. And dill, for luck.


Which just goes to show, I suppose, that everyone has their own taste in pickles, and if you're going to make the effort to prepare your own, then it's worthwhile investing a few days to do it!!
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Old 08-23-2006, 10:07 AM   #5
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Clive?! Once again you're the man: would you share your best recipe and tips?

Thank you!

Ayrton
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Old 08-23-2006, 10:09 AM   #6
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Michael, Gretchen (and Clive) -- can you advise regarding what I call a "bread & butter" pickle, i.e. with a pretty large-ish cuke (3-cm diameter), sliced, maybe with one of those cute ruffly cutters, sweetish, softly crisp, mustard seeds floating about ...?

New to pickle making, only having just made those watermelon rind ones I've blathered on about elsewhere (lord, they're good tho!)

Feeling hopeful ... thanks in advance.

A.
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Old 08-23-2006, 11:48 AM   #7
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I found that if I used pickling lime, I could get a nice crisp pickle.
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Old 08-23-2006, 10:42 PM   #8
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Dill pickles do take a while to cure but bread a butters can be made in a day. You just bring a sweet brine to a boil and scald the pickle slices. If you want them frilly, you can slice them with one of those wavy french fry cutters. I wouldnt use cucks that are very big though, you dont want a lot of seed. Thats it, then you can.
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Old 08-23-2006, 10:44 PM   #9
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[quote=bevkile]I found that if I used pickling lime, I could get a nice crisp pickle.

[what is pickling lime? I almost used alum, but decided to take my chances and see what would happen if I eliminated it. I am waiting to see how they turn out. My recipe says to use a grape leaf if you can find them. ]
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Old 08-24-2006, 04:01 AM   #10
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Hi DinaFine --

Have you made B&B's yourself? Do you have a favorite recipe you'd be willing to share?

Thanks!
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