"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Farm to Table > Canning and Preserving
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-05-2006, 06:16 PM   #1
Executive Chef
 
Dina's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mission, Texas
Posts: 2,686
Send a message via Yahoo to Dina
Pickling peppers?

I decided to also pickle my garden peppers, aside from drying them. I mixed in some of my garden carrots and added plain vinegar and salt. Should I add any powdered spices? I wonder if some cloves of garlic and sliced onions would give it some flavor? Any advise?

__________________

__________________
Dina
If you have much, give of your wealth. If you have little, give of your heart. - Arab proverb
Dina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2006, 10:45 PM   #2
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 41,371
During pickling season in the Fall, supermarkets often sell packages of pickling spices. They add a nice pickle flavor to the batch.

Garlic and onions will ad a nice flavor to yor peppers. You could also add some dried hot peppers.
__________________

__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2006, 11:56 AM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Dina's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mission, Texas
Posts: 2,686
Send a message via Yahoo to Dina
Thanks Andy. I'll look out for the spices next Fall. Just roasted some garlic and onion and added them in the pickling jar of peppers.
__________________
Dina
If you have much, give of your wealth. If you have little, give of your heart. - Arab proverb
Dina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2006, 10:14 AM   #4
Assistant Cook
 
paxpuella's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: IL
Posts: 24
I am new to canning and did not realize they sold pickling spices. I grew some pepperoncini last year and canned them for the first time. I will try the packets next year. Thanks.
__________________
paxpuella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2006, 10:22 AM   #5
Executive Chef
 
Dina's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Mission, Texas
Posts: 2,686
Send a message via Yahoo to Dina
Can the pickled peppers be left outside the fridge? Should I have boiled the cans?
__________________
Dina
If you have much, give of your wealth. If you have little, give of your heart. - Arab proverb
Dina is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2006, 10:36 AM   #6
Assistant Cook
 
paxpuella's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: IL
Posts: 24
When I canned my peppers, I bought some of the mason jars and boiled them first. I don't have a canning set, so I just used one of my stock pots and boiled them. Then after they cooled, I put my peppers and brine into the jar and put the lids on. Then I turned them upside down and boiled them for a little while longer. I am sure I probably didn't do some things right, but wanted to be sure they were safe to eat.

As I said though, I am new to canning peppers and this was my first attempt. I am going to try and find a cookbook for canning and then I'm sure I will answer my questions that way. I was surprised at how many peppers my plants had made during the last part of the summer and needed to do something with them before they turned bad.
__________________
paxpuella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2006, 11:43 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
Can the pickled peppers be left outside the fridge?
I wouldn't, based on your description of what you did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
Should I have boiled the cans?
Yes - you should have steralized the jars first, filled the hot jars with the peppers etc. and covered them with boiling vinegar, then processed for 5-10 minutes in a boiling water canner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
Should I add any powdered spices?
No - use whole spices. Ground spices will make your pickle cloudy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dina
I wonder if some cloves of garlic and sliced onions would give it some flavor?
Yes - but I probably wouldn't roast them first.


Quote:
Originally Posted by paxpuella
I probably didn't do some things right, but wanted to be sure they were safe to eat.
Humm .... to borrow from an old expression, "Close only counts in horseshoes."

If you packed the peppers in brine (salt water) - they would have to have been processed in a pressure canner before they would be safe. If your "brine" was salt and 5% vinegar - the jars should have been filled with the peppers while they (the jars) were still hot, and the vinegar brought to a boil and poured over the peppers while it was hot - and the other stuff you need to do (proper headspace, removing trapped air bubbles, wiping off the jar mouth, wiping the gasket on the hot lid dry, etc.)

It sounds like you were on the right track when you boiled them some more after filling ... but upside down is NOT the way to do it. Boiling the jars causes the air to expand and some escapes - as the jars cool the air condenses and shrinks - forming a vacuum. Boiling them upside down - the expansion of the air will force liquid out of the jars (instead of air) - which can result in either a failure to form a proper vacuum or greatly increase the chance for seal failure.

You may have seen the upside down jar process used by your Mom or Grandma when you were younger. Normally, it was used for jam, marmalade, jelly when using steralized (boiled) jars. You would remove the steralized jar, fill it with hot jam, lid it and invert for about 10-minutes, then turn right-side-up to finish cooling - they were not boiled again after filling. This technique appears to have been abandoned in "up-to-date" cookbooks somewhere between 1980-1995.

INFORMATION RESOURCES:

The Kerr & Mason Homecanning website (the folks who make the canning jars and other products) is worth visiting for good basic canning information. They also offer what I think should be the first book any new aspiring home canner should aquire - the Ball Blue Book of Preserving - $4.95. You can find the "Blue Book" from other canning websites, and book sellers, but this is the best price I've seen.

Perhaps the best and most informative website is the National Center for Home Food Preservation. Everything is based on the latest research and funded by the USDA. They even offer a free, self-paced, online study course for those wanting to learn more about home canning and preservation called Preserving Food at Home.

For some pepper recipes, from brined to fermented to pickled, you might check out the recipes at Pepperfoot.
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2006, 11:51 PM   #8
Assistant Cook
 
paxpuella's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: IL
Posts: 24
Well, as I said, I knew I didn't know a lot about canning the peppers and did some things wrong. Sometimes we have to do that in order to learn how to do them right. Thanks for the website, I'll have to read it a little later when I have time. Perhaps I can find a canning pot and the equipment to do it correctly the next time.
__________________
paxpuella is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 12:54 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 5,806
Please folks - be VERY CAREFUL when home canning. Make sure you have a CURRENT recipe/instruction book on how to do it & follow it TO THE LETTER.
You can't experiment & "do some things wrong in order to learn how to do them right". Canning, unlike cooking, doesn't work that way.


I had a wonderful cousin who canned all his own produce, & one year presented me with a lovely jar of home-canned jalapeno peppers, since he knew I loved them. I don't can, so didn't realize that the old-fashioned glass/metal-bale top wasn't considered safe anymore.

I added ONE - just ONE - of these lovely peppers to my serving of macaroni salad at a family dinner. Thank GOD no one else followed suit - especially my elderly parents.

A few hours later I was literally curled up on the floor in severe pain with a raging fever. My parents wanted to take me to the hospital, but, genious that I am, I told them I was "too sick to go to the hospital". Go figure - delirium.

Anyway, even though I was somewhat better the following day, I still wasn't fully recovered, so went to my doctor where they did a culture. The doctor frankly told me that if I had taken TWO of those peppers instead of just one, even if I had gone to the hospital it was doubtful that they would have been able to save my life.

I wish I could remember what the bacteria was. It wasn't botulism; something that began with a "C", & that the doctor said was common in home-canned products not properly processed. In any event, I, & others at the table could have died because of a home-pickled product that wasn't done according to current standards.

This is NOT something you can fool around with as far as equipment, processing, cleanliness, or storage.
__________________
BreezyCooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2006, 02:25 PM   #10
Head Chef
 
JMediger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 1,178
Quote:
Originally Posted by paxpuella
... did some things wrong. Sometimes we have to do that in order to learn how to do them right ... Perhaps I can find a canning pot and the equipment to do it correctly the next time.
First - Kudos for trying something new and for helping keep something (home canning) alive and appreciated! For us, it not only helps us save money but it is a ritual every year with my mother that I would not trade for the world. And as a teacher, yes, mistakes are a part of learning and again, kudos for trying in the first place - just take caution when you sample your peppers.

As far as formal equipment - if you don't have it and can't really afford it, here are a few things we have used in the past (especially when we were in Oregon and couldn't afford a thing!). I have a wonderful stock pot that I use to process the jars empty and then again filled. It didn't have one of those fancy jar holders so I put a clean flour sack drying towel on the bottom of the pan, filled it with water, got it to a boil (the towel will be floating around in your water) and placed the jars on top of it - they will hold down your towel and the towel will in turn protect them against the hard bottom of the pan. It should also help keep them apart during all the boiling so they don't crack. Do find a good pincher to take them out of the water with though as you don't want to disturb the lid.

As far as jars and an extra, large stock pot - I hit Goodwill. 1 Qt Mason jars go for about $.10 a piece in our neck and I was able to find an extra pot to boil the vinegar or tomatoes in (depending on what I was canning). I knew they were just for canning and always knew they were in good shape.

Just a few suggestions ... Good Luck!
__________________

__________________
JMediger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Discuss Cooking on Facebook

Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2016, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.