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Old 08-06-2014, 12:09 PM   #11
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I actually just bought a new BBQ... With a gas side burner! However I am curious as to how much propane (that stuff is expensive at $40 a small container... It doesn't last long either!) one would use doing it. Anyone have any insight to that? I already have to invest in quite a few things... If I tack on the gas costs I could be in way deep for some cans of tomato sauce... :)

I would probably make the sauce in the house on the stove, and just can outdoors.
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Old 08-06-2014, 04:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zygirl View Post
I actually just bought a new BBQ... With a gas side burner! However I am curious as to how much propane (that stuff is expensive at $40 a small container... It doesn't last long either!) one would use doing it. Anyone have any insight to that? I already have to invest in quite a few things... If I tack on the gas costs I could be in way deep for some cans of tomato sauce... :)

I would probably make the sauce in the house on the stove, and just can outdoors.
Your side burner won't use any more gas than one of your BBQ burners. Your actual pressure canning will take less time than it would take to BBQ chicken.
I don't know where you're getting your overpriced propane but your UHaul in New Brunswick is charging about $24.00 for the tank used in a gas BBQ.
Good luck.
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Old 08-06-2014, 05:28 PM   #13
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I would definitely be careful using the side burner for something heavy. Many less expensive grills don't have a sturdy frame.
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Old 08-06-2014, 07:17 PM   #14
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Just for reference, water weighs 8 pounds per gallon. I think the electric burner would be the best solution for you.
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Old 08-06-2014, 08:12 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zygirl View Post
I actually just bought a new BBQ... With a gas side burner! However I am curious as to how much propane (that stuff is expensive at $40 a small container... It doesn't last long either!) one would use doing it. Anyone have any insight to that? I already have to invest in quite a few things... If I tack on the gas costs I could be in way deep for some cans of tomato sauce... :)

I would probably make the sauce in the house on the stove, and just can outdoors.

A 20 pound propane tank will run your grill for about 20 hours. This is clearly approximate based on the size of the burners and their settings.
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Old 08-26-2014, 12:51 PM   #16
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I just came across this and thought it might be of interest. It addresses a few things that didn't come up during our discussion: Canning 101: Can You Safely Can on a Glass Top Stove? | Food in Jars
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Old 08-26-2014, 12:59 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I just came across this and thought it might be of interest. It addresses a few things that didn't come up during our discussion: Canning 101: Can You Safely Can on a Glass Top Stove? | Food in Jars
Good points made in that article.
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Old 08-27-2014, 10:00 AM   #18
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We have had many discussions here about Pressure Canners. Just my two cents: 1. I use one on my flat top stove and have had no problems. The surface area of my canner is about equal to my stock pot or my pasta pot. No one has said anything about those. You can get vaccums on items when you set them down. Remember though that vaccums are caused when a hot air under a lid is cooled and contracts. To avoid a vaccum move your canner/stock pot to the edge of the cook top where there is a slight lip, while it's still hot, problem of vaccum solved. 2. Water under 15 lbs pressure is about 257 degrees F, and so is the steam it produces. You heat the cans with the steam and therfore do not have to put 15 quarts of water in a 17 quart canner. This is not a water canner, as where you have to submerge the cans to get the 212 degree temps on them. If your pressure canner had an adjustable pressure regulator you can can at 5 PSI and get about 225 degrees for some jellies .
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